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Power Supply


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#1 fadi-sheikh

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:55 AM

Hello,

 

I just got a machine, I tested it, it looks it powers up, but I have noticed that the fan on the back of the machine

 

is not working, it is located right behind and under the power port

 

The thing is that I don't see the screen on the monitor ?

 

So the question, is changing the power supply will get the computer back to work !


Edited by fadi-sheikh, 28 February 2014 - 02:02 PM.


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#2 fadi-sheikh

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:53 PM

any help with this issue



#3 dc3

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 03:09 PM

What is the make and model of this computer?

 

When you start the computer are there any fans running at all?

 

Do you see lights on the keyboard or the computer come on when it is started?


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#4 fadi-sheikh

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 06:17 PM

What is the make and model of this computer?

 

When you start the computer are there any fans running at all?

 

Do you see lights on the keyboard or the computer come on when it is started?

 

sorry I don't have enough info about the machine but I could tell that there is sounds and cooling fan is working when I power the computer

 

and I see lights on keyboard but I don't see anything on the screen



#5 OldPhil

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 06:46 PM

It does sound as if the PSU has gone bye bye, or at least partially PSU's are inexpensive but buy a decent name.  When you supply the system specs the guys will advise you.

 

Phil


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#6 fadi-sheikh

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:10 PM

It does sound as if the PSU has gone bye bye, or at least partially PSU's are inexpensive but buy a decent name.  When you supply the system specs the guys will advise you.

 

Phil

 

so it's for sure the problem is from the PSU, which ones are recommend



#7 Alex&Vanko

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:28 PM

So this is the fan of PSU. I can recommend after I know what your PC configuration is.Also where have you put the cable from the monitor in, if you external videocard had held?



#8 OldPhil

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 10:37 PM

System specs are very important, can not progress without proper info!


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#9 the_patriot11

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 10:48 PM

the computer if it is OEM should have the brand name on the front as well as the model number, something like "HP CP500" or something like that. If the numbers arnt on the front, then they will likely be on a sticker on the back. If is a custom made then open the side panel and look on the motherboard for the brand and model number-there should be on the board somewhere something that says something similar to "ASUS" or "Gigabyte" or other brand name, followed by a series of numbers, for example "ASUS M4A G89GTD" Find those numbers and please post them 


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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#10 fadi-sheikh

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 02:38 AM

Believe me there is no name on the case, here is a picture of the damage PSU

 

click here

 

and the motherboard model is MSI G31TM-P21



#11 OldPhil

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 06:34 AM

Lower right shows it to be a 380 Watt Raid Max supply a bottom end unit, pick up a 400-450 to replace it.  better to have a tad better power.


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#12 dc3

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 11:09 AM

You guys are getting ahead of yourselves.  All we know is that there is no image on the monitor.  If the lights come and the cooling fan is running this could be a problem with the graphics card or the monitor.

 

There are two things I would suggest doing first.

 

1.  Try the monitor on another computer to make sure there is no problem with it.

 

2.  Try booting into Safe Mode.  In Safe Mode the graphics driver used is a native Windows driver.  If this works then the problem could be a driver.

 

Before you start touching components inside the case you need to discharge any electrostatic electricity in your body.  In this case touching the metal of the case will discharge  the static electricity.  Electrostatic discharges can kill board components, like Integrated circuits.

 

Since you have the case open, turn it on and see what fans are running.  There are at least three fans in the case.  One is mounted on the heat sink on the CPU, there is a circulation fan, and there is a fan inside the PSU.  Without opening the PSU you will not be able to see the fan, but it exhausts out the rear, so you should be able to feel the fan blowing if it is running.

 

If you have a voltage meter with a DC scale you can use the instructions below to test the different rail voltages of the PSU.

 

In the instructions it is suggested that you use Prime95 to place a load on the system in order to get more accurate voltage readings.  Obviously you are not going to be able to do this since you have no display.  The voltage readings will be close enough for the purpose of determining if the PSU is working or not.

 

Reading Desktop PSU Rail Voltages
 
Caution: Please read this before continuing.
 
 
* Since it will be necessary for your computer to be on during this procedure, you need to be aware that you will be working with live 12Volt DC potentials, which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. 
 
* There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges before touching any of the components inside.
 
* If you are not comfortable doing this procedure, then I would suggest that you not use this tutorial. The risks involved are minimal, but are there nevertheless. Anyone who uses this tutorial will be doing so at their own risk.
 
 
There are two devices commonly used to read the rail voltages: a PSU tester, and a multimeter. 
 
The PSU tester is the easiest to use since all that is necessary is to plug the different connectors into the tester and read the results on the LCD display. The problem with most of these is that they only perform a pass/fail test.  They will not provide you with actual voltage readings.
 
There are a variety of multiple meters, but this tutorial will address Analog and Digital multimeters. The advantage of these meters is that you will be able to obtain accurate real time voltage readings.
 
For those of you who wish to know more about multimeters there is an excellent article in Wikipedia.
 
 
Analog Multimeter
 
th_analogedited.jpg
 
 
An Analog multimeter is a little more complicated to use. Both Analog and Digital multimeters need to be set to the appropriate voltage, but with an Analog multimeter, you will need to choose the voltage range and must read the proper scale. 
 
The Analog multimeter uses a needle display which moves from 0 across the scale until it reaches the voltage being tested. This multimeter has five major linear divisions with multiple scales to read a variety of ranges. An example would be three different ranges. The first is graduated in increments of 0 through 5, the second, 0 through 10, and the third, 0 through 25. Each of these ranges are subdivided into divisions that are graduated into tenths. In order to read 12 volts the 0 through 25 range would be the appropriate one. 
 
Because DC voltage has positive and negative potentials this device is polar sensitive, this means that if you reverse the two probes when reading a positive DC voltage it will read as a negative voltage. This is actually necessary to read negative DC voltages. The two probes are differentiated by their color, Black (negative), and Red (positive). To read a positive DC voltage, the correct probes must be used with their corresponding potentials (positive to positive and negative to negative). 
 
With the probes being used normally to read a negative DC voltage, the needle moves from the 0 to the left, "pegging" the needle. By reversing the probes you can properly read the negative voltages.
 
Digital Multimeter
 
th_digitalmeteredited.jpg
 
 
The Digital multimeter (DMM) is much simpler to use. As was mentioned previously, you will need to set the appropriate voltage. One of the advantages is that the DMM has an LCD display with a numeric readout, so there are not any multiple scales to read. Another advantage is that most DMMs are autoranging when reading voltages, which means that you will not need to set the range with these DMMs. A DMM will read both positive and negative DC voltages and display them correctly. When reading a negative voltage, a minus sign will appear on the display before the numeric value. This still is a polar sensitive device, so you will still need to use the positive and negative probes with their corresponding potentials. 
 
There are five different DC rail voltages which are color coded. The Black wires are always negative.
 
Yellow +12VDC
 
Blue -12VDC
 
Red +5VDC
 
White -5VDC
 
Orange +3.3VDC
 
There are only three voltages that can be measured easily without disconnecting the 20/24 pin connector from the motherboard: +12V, +5V, and +3.3V.
 
The +12V and +5V voltages can be read from a four pin Molex power connector.
 
Four pin Molex power connector
 
th_250px-Molex_female_connector.jpg
 
 
The same voltages can be taken from a four pin SATA power connector, but in order to read the +3.3V you will need to read this from a five pin SATA power connector as seen below.
 
Five pin SATA power connector.
 
th_sata-power-cable.jpg
 
To read these voltages you will need to insert the Black (-) probe into any of the black  sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the different colored voltage sockets.   To read the voltages from a SATA power connector it is easiest to insert the probes into the bac k of the connector where the wires enter.  Unfortunately the sockets of the modular SATA power connectors are not accessible from the back, so the readings will need to be made from the socket side.  Some probes are going to be too large to fit in these sockets, so you may need to insert a piece of wire into the socket of which you want to read the voltage of and place the probe on this for your reading.  To reduce the potential of creating a short I would suggest taking the ground potential from another connector so that the two wires will remain physically separated.
 
Caution:  It is very important to make sure that you don't allow the two probes to touch each other when taking the voltage readings.  This will cause a short which could damage the PSU or other components.
 
To get accurate readings of the rail voltages it is important that there be a load on the PSU. In order to do this I would suggest downloading Prime95 for this purpose. This program was designed to be used by overclockers to put a full load on the RAM and CPU to determine the stability of their overclocking.  Because of this it will put stress on the CPU and RAM which will create higher than normal temperatures.  For this reason I would suggest not running this program any longer than is necessary.  I would also suggest that an inspection be made of the interior of the case to make sure that there isn’t an accumulation of dust which would impede adequate cooling.  Pay special attention to the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU.  If there is a dedicated graphics card with a fan installed on it, look at this fan as well.      
 
 
Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  
 
Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

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#13 OldPhil

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:21 PM

He says PSU fan not running, seems as if one rail is out.


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#14 dc3

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:27 PM

Thanks OlPhil... I had read that. :thumbup2:

 

Did you see this?

 

sorry I don't have enough info about the machine but I could tell that there is sounds and cooling fan is working when I power the computer

and I see lights on keyboard but I don't see anything on the screen


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 the_patriot11

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:45 PM

He says PSU fan not running, seems as if one rail is out.

 

no PSU fan isnt conclusive-its possible that it either failed, or it doesn't kick in until the PSU warms up, since the computer wont boot up we dont know whether thats the case. :thumbup2:


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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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