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Over 200 level 3 updates.


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#1 bwrighttwo

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:42 AM

Why would I get over 200 level 3 updates right after loading Mint and not running any other OS? Just to be clear , I deleted everything and loaded it.



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#2 larryhyman

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:48 AM

That's normal



#3 jonuk76

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 12:09 PM

Same reason you'd get hundreds of updates if you do a clean windows install and then let it connect to the internet.  It's continually being updated.


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#4 bwrighttwo

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 06:04 PM

These updates are for packages that I have never used. How does it decide what updates a certain machine needs? Keep in mind these are level 3 updates. It only had about 20 level 1 and 0 level 2.



#5 jonuk76

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 08:10 PM

 

How does it decide what updates a certain machine needs?

 

 

Basically, it checks the installed version against the version available in the repositories (commonly shortened to repo's - the software sources shown in the Update Manager).  If a newer version is available in the repository than the one that's installed, it will be offered as an update.

 

It doesn't matter if you've used a package.  If it's installed and an update is available, it will be offered.  Name a few of the packages you don't think should be on there and I'll see what I can find out...


Edited by jonuk76, 27 February 2014 - 08:19 PM.

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#6 stiltskin

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 08:14 PM

Let it update everything you have.

 

To reduce what needs updating, get rid of the things you don't use. Pull up Synaptic and go through what's installed, package by package, choosing to uninstall what you don't need/use. If aren't sure about something, keep it. If you select something and it wants to uninstall a lot of other stuff, figure out if you need any or all of those.

 

One of the first things I always do when I install something new is install the things I want which are never default, and uninstall the things I don't want or need. i replace LibreOffice with Abiword and Gnumeric. I get rid of all video drivers and input drivers that I'm never going to use. I don't play games, so I get rid of them. I have no use for instant messaging or IRC, so I uninstall them. Effects are cute for a little while, then annoying over time. So I uninstall Compiz and anything related. I have the wallpapers I plan on using (stored permanently in $HOME) and don't need the ones that are always included. So I get rid of the ones I'll never use. I get rid of all meta pacakges (they identify themselves) because they're useless to me. Besides, if you uninstall certain things, the meta packages will automatically be uninstalled with them.

 

Your tastes will be different, but the same rule applies. Once you get things the way you really want them, I think you'll find less updating. If not less often, at least fewer when you get them. Just be sure to leave anything you aren't sure about installed unless you don't mind reinstalling everything from scratch (the best way to learn your way around IMHO :lmao: ).



#7 bwrighttwo

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 08:33 PM

 

 

How does it decide what updates a certain machine needs?

 

 

Basically, it checks the installed version against the version available in the repositories (commonly shortened to repo's - the software sources shown in the Update Manager).  If a newer version is available in the repository than the one that's installed, it will be offered as an update.

 

It doesn't matter if you've used a package.  If it's installed and an update is available, it will be offered.  Name a few of the packages you don't think should be on there and I'll see what I can find out...

 

libsmbclient

libpolkit-backend-1-0

sbsigntool

iproute

bind9-host

 

 

Several Python based things.

 

 

I can add plenty more. These are just a few I do not understand. To be clear, I have read what they do.  Keep in mind this is Mint 15 I installed.


Edited by bwrighttwo, 27 February 2014 - 08:35 PM.


#8 bwrighttwo

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 08:39 PM

A few more.

 

 

virtualbox-guest-x11

passwd

 

A bunch of icedtea stuff



#9 jonuk76

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:30 PM

libsmbclient - Library related to Samba.  This allows you to connect to Windows networks using the smb/cifs protocol.  Standard part of many Linux distro's.

libpolkit-backend-1-0 - Polkit backend API.  Polkit is part of the operating system and controls privileges.

sbsigntool - Operating system component used to sign and verify files when using UEFI secure boot.  UEFI secure boot is a feature on newer machines (e.g. ones pre-installed with Windows 8).

iproute - Controls TCP/IP networking.  This is how you connect to the internet.  Component of the operating system.

Bind9-host - Networking component of operating system (utilities for querying DNS servers).

passwd - Core operating system component for maintaining system passwords.

Virtualbox-guest-x11 - Contains tools useful when running the operating system from within a VirtualBox virtual machine.  Not really needed otherwise.

IcedTea is an open source Java implementation.  It allows you to run Java based web applications.  Can be removed if no requirement to use Java.


Edited by jonuk76, 27 February 2014 - 09:31 PM.

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#10 bwrighttwo

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:37 PM

Thank you for your time.



#11 jonuk76

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:28 AM

No problem :)  If your previous computing experience has been with Windows, most of the above type of updates (updates to operating system files) would be bundled as something like "Security Update for Windows x - KBxxxxxx".  Windows doesn't normally tell you exactly what they are unless you go looking for that information. They are perfectly normal and indeed by keeping your system up to date with the latest patches it improves security.


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#12 bwrighttwo

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 10:36 AM

I was mainly curious because I have done 2 other machines that did not give anywhere close to that many LEVEL 3 updates. Most were LEVEL 1 & 2 and were related to Mint.



#13 jonuk76

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:58 AM

Just to confirm, I just did a clean install of Mint 16 x64 on a PC, and after downloading the initial single update, was faced with a large number of updates of 1, 2 and 3 levels (the biggest number by far was of the 3's).  These are from Ubuntu rather than directly from Mint.


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#14 cat1092

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:37 AM

This can also depend on which version of Linux Mint was installed. Since the OP has stated that Mint 15 is the installed OS, more updates will be required than a Mint 16 install (of which I have 3) would. Mint 13, which I have on an older computer, has more.

 

However the good thing is, this huge number of updates is normally a one time deal, unlike Windows, updates are released as needed, not 2-3 weeks later, so most regualr users won't get a ton of updates at once after the install. That's providing Mint is ran at least once a week. Many of those Level 3 updates, while not Critical, can enhance the user experience with added features,

 

Unlike Windows Update, I've never found Mint's updates bogs down the system. It seems that if anything, Mint (& other versions of Linux) runs faster the more it's used. And never needs defragmentation. If a Linux OS is bogged down, their 2 possibilities. The first & most likely reason, the computer is too old to meet the demand. Mint 13 still runs on my T42 ThinkPad, but not as great as Mint 16 runs on my XPS 8700. The second is that the HDD is slowing down due to age. Nothing  in the end, can prevent this. A 3rd & remote possibility would be an infection, though this is rare, but not impossible.

 

200 Level 3 updates sounds reasonable for Mint 15. +.

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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