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Why are after defragging 3 GB additional free space available?


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#1 Dirkk

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 08:35 AM

After defraggaing a C: partition with about 5,5 GB free space and 53,6 GB capacity on that partition there now are 8,8 GB free space. Why is that? Why are there 3,3 GB more free space on that partition?

 

The times before I used UltraDefrag, now Defraggler. Which program is better?


Windows 10 Home, 64bit


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#2 dls62

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 10:12 AM

It's difficult to give you a definitive answer, however one possibility is that some system restore points were deleted during the defragmentation process and this is a known issue in Windows.

 

As to which is the better program, they both do a good job.  To a certain extent it is up to personal choice.  And if you've got a SSD you don't need to defrag.



#3 Dirkk

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 01:11 PM

OK, thank you,

 

Good to hear a plausible explanation for it and better some lost restore points than a defect hard drive. I hope there are no possibilities that you might lose your own data by defragmentation.

 

Regrattably no SSD, but a normal 2,5'' SATA (or so).

 

Defraggler I am using at the moment shows 33 % defragmantation, done in about 3, 4 days, so that means, it will need about a week or so for the rest, I guess. Extremely long time for a partition with 878 GB of two on a 1 TB drive. I assume all of the defrag programs will need about the same time.

 

Many thanks again.


Windows 10 Home, 64bit


#4 dls62

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 01:24 PM

Defrag programs tend to have their own algorithms for file placement, so the first time it is run on a drive it will take longer.  The time it takes all depends upon the number of files and more importantly the size of the files.  A lot of smaller files will take longer to defrag than a few large ones.

 

Defragmenters work by copying a file before deleting the original so it is extremely unlikely that you would lose any data unless you have a defective disk.  And if defragmenters did do that people wouldn't use them!



#5 Dirkk

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 01:40 PM

Well, I hope the defragmentation will speed up at least a litte the system. But firstly I do it to extend C: and that is not possible with a fragmented hard drive, so says the partition tool.

 

Good, almost no risk, that sounds calming.

 

Many thanks.


Windows 10 Home, 64bit





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