Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

3 computers, 2 networks - how to steer?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 drdumont

drdumont

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:49 PM

Posted 22 February 2014 - 03:15 AM

I have 3 computers on a 10/100 network connected to the Internet through my router.

I would like to add a GB NIC to each computer, connect the three together through a GB switch (unmanaged),

so file transfer between the computers would be separate (and faster), but each computer could connect to the

Internet through the regular circuit (which is speed limited by the gateway.

I tried reading up on Net Masking, etc, but my hair began to hurt.

How do I "direct the traffic", as it were?

Thanks in advance,

-- Doc


Edited by hamluis, 22 February 2014 - 09:38 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to Networking - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 54,857 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:07:49 PM

Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:37 AM

See http://compnetworking.about.com/od/homenetworkhardware/f/routervsswitch.htm, reference purposes.

 

IMO, the simpler solution would be to acquire a GB router...add your NICs...and conduct business as usual.  Example below. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-WR1043ND-Ultimate-Wireless-Detachable/dp/B002YLAUU8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1393079512&sr=8-1&keywords=1Gibabit+router

 

Louis



#3 CaveDweller2

CaveDweller2

  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:49 PM

Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:08 AM

I tend to agree with hamluis. Is there a reason you want them separated? how old are the PCs? because if they were made in the last few years the NICs in them might be 10/100/1000 already and just use 100 because that is the speed of the switch in the router you use.


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#4 drdumont

drdumont
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:49 PM

Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:02 PM

Wow! Thanks so much for the speedy replies.

Indeed, one of the computers is really old, the builtin NIC is only 10Mb. I can't upgrade that

box due to some hardware issues, stuff which controls certain gear and won't move to a faster

processor. Long story.

 

And the GB NICs and switch came to hand at no charge. Surplus from a job, as it were...

 

I'll look up the GB router, all three computers sit next to each other, so cabling isn't an issue.

 

-- DOc



#5 CaveDweller2

CaveDweller2

  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:49 PM

Posted 22 February 2014 - 02:33 PM

a router would be your best bet if you don't need the internet and the GB network you talked about to be separate.  

 

what OS is on the PC with the 10 Mbs card?


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#6 drdumont

drdumont
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:49 PM

Posted 23 February 2014 - 12:37 PM

Slow components are the one old XP computer with the 10 Mb NIC, and the Internet router (between my ISP and me).

The other machines are Windows 7. All are members of a Workgroup. I've thus far eschewed the "Homegroup" concept, since

the XP machine obviouls doesn't understand Homegroups.

The point of all this is that I need to transfer files from machine to machine, and want to take advantage of the GB network

for this. If I disable the adapter connecting to the Internet thus forcing traffic to the GB network, things fly.

Would that there were a way to make shares point to a certain NIC.

At this point, I am thinking of a manual switch to interrupt the connection to the slow network, or maybe there's an app or

batch file to do that. But that's a little medieval.

 

All three machines can make use of the GB network, and data flies. But once the 10mb network (the Internet side) links all three machines,

traffic wants to flow through that side. If this were plumbing, it wouldn't work that way! Thus my bright idea of creating a separate high speed loop.

Now all I have to do is figure out how to build a fence... File shares this way to the GB net, Internet traffic to the 10mb net.

 

As I was proofreading this, I thought about using the fastest machine to connect to the internet over one NIC, then using it to share Internet

access with everyone else. But not very elegant...

 

Thanks for your time!

-- Doc



#7 CaveDweller2

CaveDweller2

  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:49 PM

Posted 23 February 2014 - 03:40 PM

I'm confused. Fast Ethernet or 100Mbs came into being in 1995. If that XP machine truly has a 10Mbs card in it, it would have to be older than that.

 

Are you saying you only get 10Mbs if you do a speed test on your internet speed? Because that is what you pay for from your ISP and has nothing to do with your LAN. If all the machines have a GB NIC, which is what I think you just said, and your ISP provided modem/router is only a 10/100, then you can do 1 of 2 things: buy a new GB router, turn off DHCP on the ISP router or new router and plug into the new router OR just buy a non-managed GB switch, plug all PCs into it and then plug a cat 6 cable between the switch and ISP router. Of the 2 I'd just buy a switch unless it's the same money then I'd buy the router.

 

I say buy the switch because that is all you really want to use in the new router anyway, the 4 port GB switch inside it to make local transfers faster. There is no need for you to use 2 networks, if you have everything on your LAN at GB speed then any xfers made on the LAN will be GB. You may have to tell the NICs to use GB but I believe if you just leave everything on Auto windows will take care of it for you.


Edited by CaveDweller2, 23 February 2014 - 03:41 PM.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#8 drdumont

drdumont
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:49 PM

Posted 04 March 2014 - 05:22 AM

Apparently I have found a solution if not the solution. Before, all file transfers went through the onboard NIC, which although a GB device, data crawled through.

 

Normal network on 192.168.15.xxx, All machines connect to the slow ISP access point.  GB NICs connected through new GB switch on 10.0.1.xxx. No Internet portal on this network.

 

I discovered this thread   support.microsoft.com/kb/2526067

 

Seems that this procedure tells the system to look for the target machine using the specified NIC first. Of course, the onboard NIC was listed first since it was installed first. I had only two machines on line at the moment,

 

Before, when initiating a transfer, the GB switch sat there twiddling its electronic thumbs with nothing to do, as evidenced by lack of activity on the LEDs. As soon as I made the change on the sending machine and initiated a transfer, the LEDs on the GB router showed all kinds of feverish activity, and the transfer showed a huge uncrease in speed. While at the same time, a  torrent file was being transferred on the internal NIC to the Internet, topping out at the usual speed. After getting everyone back on line with the dual setup, all transfer between machines use the 10.0.1.xxx network at much higher speeds than before, while the 192.168.15.x network runs as before.

 

I think this is that for which I was looking all along. Maybe I am curing diahrrea by monkeying with the toilet, but this seems to achieve the objective.

 

Thanks very much to all who took their valuable time to help, and I welcome any comments at any time.

 

-- Doc


Edited by drdumont, 04 March 2014 - 05:27 AM.


#9 CaveDweller2

CaveDweller2

  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:49 PM

Posted 04 March 2014 - 02:11 PM

umm ok glad it works for you,


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users