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Telling if it's a good computer


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#1 ChasingCars

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 02:59 PM

Hello everyone, I'm currently trying to figure out the hardware part of a computer.

 

I want to be able to when looking around in a store tell my friends if it's a good computer or not and why not.

 

Type : Híbrid

Processor : Intel® Core™ i7-4500U Dual Core

RAM : 4 GB

Hard Disk : 500 GB

Graphics Card : Intel® HD Graphics 5000

 

For example, looking at this one what could I tell about each part of it and which ones are good and which ones ain't and how could they be better.

 

Thanks a lot for the help!


Edited by ChasingCars, 18 February 2014 - 03:00 PM.


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#2 zingo156

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 04:00 PM

Intel i7s are some of the fastest cpu's available for consumer market. The 4500u is of the 4th generation code named Haswell. Intel will out perform amd per clock cycle in GHz, as far as GHz goes, the higher the number the faster the clock speed. example: 1.8GHz is slower than 3.0GHz.

 

As far as ram goes, again higher clock speed = better performance but then also latency plays a part... More ram in GB = better multi-tasking ability. Example 8GB is better than 4GB. Most users will not use much more than 4GB currently.

 

Storage and hard drives, more GB is better. SSD's are faster but often smaller in total GB storage space.

 

Graphics are similar to cpu and ram, higher clock speed and more ram generally means better performance. There are too many chips to list, you will need to research which are the best in certain situations. Sometimes amd is better than nvidia and vice versa.

 

I usually try to figure out what a user is going to do with the computer before recommending anything.


Edited by zingo156, 18 February 2014 - 04:01 PM.

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#3 ChasingCars

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 04:48 PM

Intel i7s are some of the fastest cpu's available for consumer market. The 4500u is of the 4th generation code named Haswell. Intel will out perform amd per clock cycle in GHz, as far as GHz goes, the higher the number the faster the clock speed. example: 1.8GHz is slower than 3.0GHz.

 

As far as ram goes, again higher clock speed = better performance but then also latency plays a part... More ram in GB = better multi-tasking ability. Example 8GB is better than 4GB. Most users will not use much more than 4GB currently.

 

Storage and hard drives, more GB is better. SSD's are faster but often smaller in total GB storage space.

 

Graphics are similar to cpu and ram, higher clock speed and more ram generally means better performance. There are too many chips to list, you will need to research which are the best in certain situations. Sometimes amd is better than nvidia and vice versa.

 

I usually try to figure out what a user is going to do with the computer before recommending anything.

 

Thanks a lot for the reply.

Waiting on more inputs but you gave me the general idea I needed.



#4 hamluis

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 02:30 PM

"Good"...doesn't signify anything in the computer world...since what was "good" last year...or last week...or yesterday...has been replaced today :).

 

Your use of "good" implies purpose...what purpose are you attempting to evaluate?  A netbook is fine for Web access but it's not designed to compete with a business laptop or a desktop.

 

What tasks are you basing your evaluation on?

 

Generally speaking...a newer OEM system...may be "better" than an older OEM system...but an older OEM system with high-quality parts...may outperform the new systems that are made to be throwaway systems by OEMs.

 

It's not as simple as you seem to think it is...when attempting to evaluate a system...without knowing purpose, price considerations, user activities on the system, etc.  A system that is good for me...would not be good for a gamer...and vice versa.

 

I don't think that you can get an intelligent answer to the question you proposed...without broad generalities that may or may not be applicable in a given situation.

 

Louis



#5 ChasingCars

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 02:35 PM

"Good"...doesn't signify anything in the computer world...since what was "good" last year...or last week...or yesterday...has been replaced today :).

 

Your use of "good" implies purpose...what purpose are you attempting to evaluate?  A netbook is fine for Web access but it's not designed to compete with a business laptop or a desktop.

 

What tasks are you basing your evaluation on?

 

Generally speaking...a newer OEM system...may be "better" than an older OEM system...but an older OEM system with high-quality parts...may outperform the new systems that are made to be throwaway systems by OEMs.

 

It's not as simple as you seem to think it is...when attempting to evaluate a system...without knowing purpose, price considerations, user activities on the system, etc.  A system that is good for me...would not be good for a gamer...and vice versa.

 

I don't think that you can get an intelligent answer to the question you proposed...without broad generalities that may or may not be applicable in a given situation.

 

Louis

 

Thank you so much. :)






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