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Installed Ubuntu on ASUS EeePC - Any tweaks to run faster?


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#1 Cecilia421

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 08:44 AM

Hi, all,

 

I'm totally new to Ubuntu. I had an EeePC netbook that was running WinXP and installing Ubuntu seemed like a good way to repurpose netbook and give me a platform to play with Ubuntu so that I can learn it. Everything installed fine and it's running well, but really slowly. I'm not overly surprised by that, since the netbook has a grand total of 1GB of RAM and is running an Intel Atom CPU. My question is, is there anything I can do to get Ubuntu to run faster? Or do you have a suggestion for a more stripped-down opensource OS that I could install instead that would run faster? I basically want to be able to run LibreOffice or OpenOffice, check email/Facebook, maybe play some light games (Solitaire?). Nothing real fancy.

 

I'm basically a diehard Windows user (don't judge me!) but I want to learn some other OS's as well.

 

Thanks!


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 09:45 PM

Havent played with unbuntu much so no advice there.

 

But if you want to try a fast easy linux try sinplicity linux. ( around 200 meg)

http://simplicitylinux.org/2014/01/simplicity-linux-14-1netbook-desktop-and-media-editions-released/

 

http://youtu.be/MXEjXStWbq8

 

 

 

Puppy linux. 5.7.1 fatty ( 3.7 gig dl) I use this 1 and think its good for a windows refugee It has just about everything you need on it including wine so you can run windows progs.

http://archive.org/details/Puppy_Linux_precise-5.7.1-retro-fatty-2014-jan-csipesz

 

puppy linux 5.7.1 precise

http://puppylinux.com/download/

 

 

http://youtu.be/qkDYveZZkp8

 

All these will run live ( from a dvd/cd) download 1 burn the iso to cd/dvd set pc to boot from cd/dvd  and enjoy. Or you can install them to just about anything USB SD card (even a potatoe joking) and boot that way. My suggestion is puppy linux fatty installed to Hard Drive.

 

There are others like linux lite lububtu but again I havent played around with many.

 

I will leave it up to others to give tips on ubuntu.

 

Ps.

Good for you learning something new.

 

1GB of RAM and is running an Intel Atom CPU

Running a light linux will make that pc fast I know a lot of guys who run light linux( puppy) with 512 meg of ram on pc's that came off noahs ark seriously. On your pc puppy linux will seem like new Ferrari.  1 minute boot up's shut down in a few seconds. Progs will launch fast. 

 

I notice a few of the hard working malware removal team also play with  linux, I wonder what antivirus they use on linux. LOL

 

On that note I also wish to thank the staff of BC for all the hard work they put in helping people with malware problems.


Edited by NickAu1, 13 February 2014 - 10:28 PM.


#3 Cecilia421

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 08:46 AM

Thanks! Those look like some really neat options. How user friendly are they for someone who has no clue about anything other than Windows and limited computer knowledge? I'm actually setting up the netbook for a friend and she needs something that will run with little to no configuration required. Does that change your recommendation?

 

That's why I picked Ubuntu - since it's pretty user friendly even if you don't know a lot about alternative OS's. It doesn't have to do anything fancy, like I said in the beginning. Run OpenOffice/LibreOffice and do internet surfing. Maybe a light game or two. I mean, it runs on the netbook, it's just pretty slow.


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#4 jonuk76

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 12:18 PM

I recently put Lubuntu 13.10 on a netbook.  This was a Samsung with 1Gb RAM, Atom N550 processor and it ran Windows 7 Starter Edition slowly.  It however is perfectly usable with Lubuntu and there was no problem with hardware detection.  Lubuntu is basically Ubuntu with a simpler desktop and runs better on low spec PC's.  It uses the same program repositories and is otherwise identical though.


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#5 Cecilia421

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 12:49 PM

Thanks, @jonuk76 - that looks like a real possibilty! I'll read into it.


"Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards."
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#6 NickAu

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 07:05 PM

@ jonuk76 I agree with you on lubuntu but as I said I have not played with it much so I didnt want to suggest it.

 

@ Cecillia  The puppy fatty ( 3.7 gig dl) is easy to set up. The beauty of Linux is that you can try it from a live disc without installing anything.

 

I think I would be correct in saying that most people that try linux usually try a few distros before settling on the 1 they like.

 

As the what is best , Well I think its a case of what works for you, The only way to tell is to try it out, The beautiful thing about Linux is that once you get to know it you can configure it almost any way you like.

 

Ps.

 

Linux forums are a lot of help too, You could go to the XXXXX linux forum have a read of some of the stuff see if anybody ran into any issues etc and the fixes.

 

Just remember Linux is just an operating system regardless of the Windows v Linux thing they all have good and bad points.


Edited by NickAu1, 14 February 2014 - 07:11 PM.


#7 stiltskin

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 08:34 PM

Lubuntu is good. So are some others.  Basically most things with either the LXDE or XFCE desktops as default. Just turn off any desktop effects and they'll be fine. (One of the first things I always unnstall is compiz. It just uses resources too much, and it's not that special after you get over the initial "gee whiz" factor.)

 

I'd also recommend Mint if you maxed out the RAM and change the desktop (you can install more and choose the one you want when you login).. On ASUS with 2G it's fine. But I wouldn't suggest it on an Acer. I have two of those and Mint crashes randomly on both. It never crashed on the ASUS I had, or on the HP I have now. That Acers are different models and it crashes on both of them.

 

If you're counting, that's 3 netbooks I have now (one has been made into a Chromebook-like device; I also used to have a Chromebook, so I knew what to do to make linux work like one) and one I don't have any more.



#8 cat1092

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 02:06 AM

As stiltskin has reported, with 2GB RAM, you should be able to run the Full version of Linux Mint. Currently I'm running the full version of Mint 13 on a ThinkPad T42, which has 2GB of plain old DDR 2700 RAM, not DDR2 or 3 & the CPU is non-PAE equipped, Which is why I'm stuck with Mint 13 for a full install, it was the last version that would run on non-PAE computers.

 

Runs circles around the installed version of XP Pro that it dual boots with. That Intel Atom you have has to be more powerful than my 1.7GHz Dothan Pentium M. And likely runs higher spec RAM, at least DDR2, if not DDR3. Just download it & use unetbootin to create a bootable Flash drive/SD card, as many small PC's has no optical media.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 NickAu

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 04:59 PM

You could try this. And welcome to Linux.

 

Preload is a program written by Behdad Esfahbod which runs as a daemon and records statistics about usage of programs using Markov chains; files of more frequently-used programs are, during a computer's spare time, loaded into memory. This results in faster startup times as less data needs to be fetched from disk. preload is often paired with prelink.

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Preload

 

 Type in Terminal.

sudo apt-get install preload

Thats all you have to do.

 

 

Swappiness is a Linux kernel parameter that controls the relative weight given to swapping out runtime memory, as opposed to dropping pages from the system page cache. Swappiness can be set to values between 0 and 100 inclusive. A low value causes the kernel to avoid swapping, a higher value causes the kernel to try to use swap space. The default value is 60, and for most desktop systems, setting it to 100 may affect the overall performance, whereas setting it lower (even 0) may decrease response latency.[1]

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swappiness

 

Change Swappiness Value
1. Run terminal

2. Enter following line to see current swappiness value
cat
/proc/sys/vm/swappiness
(default value in Ubuntu for swappiness is 60)

3. Open file /etc/sysctl.conf in a text editor,
You must have root access to do this bit
Type sudo gedit /etc/sysctl.conf

4. Enter the following By Copy/Paste or type  to the bottom of the page it will be the last entry.
# Decrease swappiness value
vm.swappiness=10


5. Save the file and Reboot.


Edited by NickAu1, 22 March 2014 - 05:02 PM.





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