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XP reboot loop with blue screen UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME


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#1 bludshot

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 11:51 PM

One of my computers running windows XP started to reboot during windows loading. It gets to the windows loading screen and then reboots. It keeps doing this forever. I used F8 to set it not to reboot automatically so I could see the blue screen error.

 

The error is UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME

 

I checked that all the wires and ram and cards are seated properly, and I used a vista recovery cd to run chkdsk /r

 

It found a couple small things and fixed them (something like 4 sectors)

 

But it keeps getting the same UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME blue screen.

 

The user caused this by using the power button on the front of the machine to turn the computer off while windows was still loading (shortly after getting to the desktop). Upon next boot it got this error. (Also the user has apparently used the power button to turn off the machine many times in the past...)

 

What should I try next?



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 06:35 AM

rewriting the MBR seems like a pretty good step. TestDisk is a great tool for this if you are not scared of command lines.

 

here's a step by step tutorial on how to use it, just skip to the bit you need.

 

--------------------------------------------

edit:edited link to particular issue.


Edited by TsVk!, 13 February 2014 - 06:39 AM.


#3 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:17 AM

 

 

Also the user has apparently used the power button to turn off the machine many times in the past...

 

Well, sudden power failure can not only corrupts the file system but also cause developing bad sectors.

 

 

 

It found a couple small things and fixed them (something like 4 sectors)

 

I would suggest running a full surface scan using Seagate Seatool ( even if your HDD is a different brand) which is very accurate in finding bad sectors.

 

Seatools for DOS disc image --> http://www.seagate.com/in/en/support/downloads/item/seatools-dos-master/

 

What you need to do is running a "Long test" with it.

 

seatools-2.png 

 

Please report whether the test is a "PASS" or "FAIL".


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 13 February 2014 - 07:17 AM.


#4 hamluis

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 10:01 AM

The typical fix for Unmountable Boot Volume errors in XP...is to run the chkdsk /r command (hopefully) from the Recovery Console.  If you don't have an XP disk, there is a workaround for the RC.

 

A previous member with error:  http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/455369/unmountable-boot-volume-loop-xp/ .

 

Louis



#5 bludshot

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 09:55 PM

rewriting the MBR seems like a pretty good step. TestDisk is a great tool for this if you are not scared of command lines.

 

here's a step by step tutorial on how to use it, just skip to the bit you need.

 

--------------------------------------------

edit:edited link to particular issue.

 

No joy with this. I run testdisk, create log, choose my only harddrive, intel/pc partition, analyse, and it shows one ntfs partition, and it's got a * indicating it is a bootable partition. Therefore I can't get to the part of the step by step tutorial that talks about NTFS boot sector recovery, because to get to that, when I do the above it needs to show "no partition is bootable"

 

ie: this tool indicates there is no problem



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 10:14 PM

If you have a bootable disk of the recover console or an XP install disk, I would try the fixboot command.

#7 bludshot

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 10:24 PM

I used a vista recovery cd to run chkdsk /r

 

It found a couple small things and fixed them (something like 4 sectors)

 

 

The typical fix for Unmountable Boot Volume errors in XP...is to run the chkdsk /r command

 

Yeah, unfortunately it didn't fix it.  I'm doing the long seatools test now though, so we'll see how that goes.



#8 bludshot

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 11:21 PM

Well, sudden power failure can not only corrupts the file system but also cause developing bad sectors.

 

Yup, that's why I mentioned it.

 

Seagate Seatool "Long test"

 

Please report whether the test is a "PASS" or "FAIL".

 

I ran the long test. It says: Long Test Errors. ...  Unfortunately, your Seagate hard drive has failed an important diagnostic test, possibly caused by problem sectors which are difficult to read. ...  Seagate recommends that you consider repairing the problem sectors.

 

Then it comes up with another box saying: Errors detected during LONG TEST  Error(s) Detected on NON Seagate Drive. (contact hd maker etc etc)

 

Then it comes up with yet another box saying: Sector Repair Failure   ... Repair was unsuccessful on the hard drive.

 

The log says the short and long tests failed, and also that it was not able to get SMART data (because it is disabled apparently)

 

 

Now, I know this suggests that the HD is just toast, but that's not quite right, because I can view the contents of the drive, and I can start to boot to windows (it just reboots when it gets to mup.sys (or whatever is after mup.sys)



#9 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 11:33 PM

 

 

Now, I know this suggests that the HD is just toast, but that's not quite right, because I can view the contents of the drive, and I can start to boot to windows (it just reboots when it gets to mup.sys (or whatever is after mup.sys)

 

Your HDD is clearly failed. Just you can view the contents doesn't mean the HDD is in good shape. Surface defect means some areas of your hard drive developed bad sectors. Once bad sectors are started to develop, they will spread slowly and entire HDD will be toasted over time ( like cancer cells ). What you can do is nothing but boot from a live Linux CD and backup your data. Then replace the HDD with a brand new one.



#10 TsVk!

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 11:35 PM

Looks like your drive is quiche...

 

You should buy another and transfer your important data over to it using a live tool (that which will read anyhow), in a separate partition, then install your new OS on another partition.

 

At least you have clarity on your issue now. If you need help partitioning and installing your new OS, we are here to help.



#11 bludshot

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:55 PM

If you have a bootable disk of the recover console or an XP install disk, I would try the fixboot command.

 

I tried fixboot, and it said it succeeded. But the blue screen problem persists :/

 

Trying repair installation now


Edited by bludshot, 14 February 2014 - 06:06 PM.


#12 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 10:25 PM

 

 

Trying repair installation now

 

You may be able to complete the repairs and boot Windows successfully but within near future the drive will fail completely and you may ended up with losing all data. Your system and your choice.



#13 TsVk!

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 10:42 PM

Ashnad is 100% correct, even repairing it may knock the last nail in the coffin and make it fail completely... all data gone forever.



#14 bludshot

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 07:16 PM

Fair point.  Anyway I did the repair installation, it completed fully, no problems, no complaints about the hard drive or anything. (Well, except it asked for an Nvidia cd with some driver, I just told it no since I never had that cd)  ...AND: no effect.  It still reboots just the same as before, still has the same blue screen error. I actually find that bizarre, I would think that the repair installation would either fail, or succeed and fix it. Succeeding and not fixing it? Weird.

 

Tried the solution here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/393442/windows-xp-freezes-at-mupsys-in-safe-modeno-administrator-passowrd/  (probably not the same problem, because I think they *froze* at mup.sys, and I restart at mup.sys) it didn't fix it. Tried going a few restore snapshots back, also didn't fix it.

 

 

EDIT (conclusion): Yeah, to my understanding there is a range between a HD being completely failed / dead, and being In fully Good Shape. This drive can be mounted, you can view and access all of it's files. What I have learned and what I will post here in the unlikely event that this could be useful to someone googling some day, is that a hard drive can be functional, working, and accessible and seemingly fine, yet because of a small handful of bad sectors, windows XP can become unbootable, and because of the damage/instability of the drive (we're talking 4 bad sectors here) XP cannot be fixed.

 

All you can do is chkdsk /r   (and fixboot if needed) and if that doesn't work, nothing will.

 

Gonna stick the drive in my usb toaster, backup the files and then do a WD test scan and see how bad the drive is (probably garbage can bound)


Edited by bludshot, 15 February 2014 - 09:06 PM.


#15 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 12:05 AM

 

 

Gonna stick the drive in my usb toaster, backup the files and then do a WD test scan and see how bad the drive is 

 

If your HDD is Western Digital one, WD Data Life Guard Diagnostic Tool may be able to fix the bad sectors by remapping them with good sectors from the sector reserve pool. But usually the repaired drive won't survive longer. If this system is not for business use and no important data is going to be saved in this system, you can try to repair the drive. I would recommend running the DOS version of the tool with which you will have better chance of success.

 

https://app.box.com/shared/gl0fifqgj4

 

What you need to run is the "Extended Test" which will do a full surface scan and repair. Make sure to backup all the data before running the test. If the tool succeeded to repair the drive, you may need to do repair install one more time. 

 

 

 

because of the damage/instability of the drive (we're talking 4 bad sectors here) XP cannot be fixed.

 

Even a single bad sector means the drive is faulty. At work, if i encounter a drive with a single bad sector that will be ended up in the waste bin. Trying to repair software when there is hardware fault is nothing but waste of time.


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 16 February 2014 - 12:10 AM.





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