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RAID on laptop?


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#1 Blue_Two

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 04:47 PM

I was surprised by the number of RAID drivers on my laptop. My machine (and probably all laptops) will only ever have one hard drive. Come to think of it, why would any computer with only one hard drive need RAID drivers?



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:44 PM

They just bundle it as part of Windows... The installer does not care whether you have a desktop or laptop, it just dumps everything you could possibly need onto your system. There are many services and drivers running that you will never use.



#3 myrti

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 01:02 PM

The Acer S7 actually comes with an SSD raid, the sense and utility of which can be debated.. But there definietly are laptops in need of raid drivers out there :wink:

 

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#4 cat1092

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 01:29 AM

Though RAID is typically more seen on desktops, many laptops has the place for one or possibly two extra HDD's, sometimes already installed & possibly even mSATA as an upgrade option. One combination that I've seen on my favorite brand of laptop, MSI, is a 240GB SSD + two 500GB HDD's.

 

I have dual drives (SSD+HDD) on both of my laptops, a MSI & Toshiba, this was easily accomplished by removal of the optical drive & using a Jacobs Parts optical drive adapter to install a SSD in it's place. For $5-6, a special cable to use or boot from the rarely used optical drive via USB can be found on eBay. It is best to leave the stock HDD where it is, as it'll cool better.

 

Though I use this space as my SSD install & my OEM HDD, in it's native place, has a Linux install, partitions for Windows Data & SSD backup, it also could possibly be setup as a RAID drive, However, though I haven't worked with RAID, I have installed SATA RAID cards in desktop PC's, that shipped with IDE, for the SATA use only (usually the Rosewill RC-212 card). I did actually see one laptop with some form of RAID (two 500GB HDD's mirroring), but don't know how it was accomplished, Maybe through software or BIOS, though I haven't seen a RAID option in my laptop's BIOS. There are also external RAID setups at Newegg/Amazon, though this would be impractical for a laptop user.

 

After much reading on the subject, and some advice on tech forums, I decided to stay away from RAID, as all it takes is one HDD to go bad, things goes south. What I was looking for was a way to continually mirror my SSD to another of like size, essentially to have a clone at all times. However I was advised while this may be good to do to a non-SSD of equal size, it may not be the best option to mirror 2 SSD's due to the writes involved. Because in essence, if the mirrored SSD was needed, it would already have been through a lot of R/W cycles & SSD deteroration would have already began.

 

So I decided a bi-weekly backup was a better solution.

 

While I realize that many uses RAID, after the reading of many forum posts relating to troubleshooting & even a few tech articles, even on my desktop I decided to not do RAID. It seems to be a lot of work for little gain. As in speed/performance, any gains are marginal at best. If there are any slower drives in the mix, there goes any gains, if that was the purpose of the RAID build.

 

However, if one decides to do it, post any results, it would be interesting reading. Along with what software (or method) used to build the RAID. As I know that one cannot install a standard SATA RAID card in a laptop.

 

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#5 TsVk!

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 03:46 AM

RAID is best implemented for servers and critical data situations. Not a domestic solution.

 

I never saw working RAID before I saw servers.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 12:47 AM

I sort of figured that RAID was less consumer oriented, based on much reading. Yet can be great when properly implemented on servers.

 

Though I've read many forum posts & articles in regards to RAID usage on self built PC's to increase storage, I just didn't see the benefit to implement it myself.

 

There are other options to increase performance & storage w/out RAID for the domestic user.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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