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Upgrading CPU - seems to easy?


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#1 tbarb

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 06:53 PM

I just installed an SSD and Windows 7 into an older machine and am thinking about installing a faster cpu before I am completely done with it. In reading articles/posts on the web it sounds too easy. Articles talk about removing the old fan/heat sink and scraping/isopropyl alcohol clean the old thermal paste, then repast and carefully drop your new cpu in and re assemble the heatsinkl/fan. There is nothing about any BIOS changes with the exception of just one article that said to use a program ( HWinfo or cupid to check mobo settings) and it said I would have to change the speed in the cpu section of the BIOS if I was putting in a faster cpu.  Of course that is the point of doing this.

 

So I am left wondering if these programs HWinfo or cupid are worth any info they will give me, but mostly are cpu's that are listed as compatible by the mobo mfg really that plug and play?  

 

 

BYW thinking of the Intel Q9650 cpu  on a ASUS P5W DH Deluxe mobo.

 

Thanks



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#2 rotor123

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 07:26 PM

Ok, I took a look here. http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/list.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=p5w%20dh%20deluxe&p=1

 

They show two q9650 CPUs as supported from BIOS version 2103

 

Core 2 Quad Q9650(rev.C1,3.00GHz,1333FSB,L2:12MB) ALL 2103 gogo.gif Optional Support for 45nm Wolfdale / Yorkfield CPUs, Refer to FAQ   Core 2 Quad Q9650(rev.E0,3.00GHz,1333FSB,L2:12MB) ALL 2103 gogo.gif Optional Support for 45nm Wolfdale / Yorkfield CPUs, Refer to FAQ  

Those two should work OK if You can find them.

This is the other info page they have. I suggest reading it.

 

Also Always refer to the maker for the best information on what CPUs will work.

 

Good Luck

Roger


Edited by rotor123, 08 February 2014 - 07:27 PM.
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#3 tbarb

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 09:59 PM

Thanks Roger -

Been there read that.  What I was asking and could have been more direct is that if the cpu is supported by the mobo is that all there is to installing one? I mean just physically placing it in the socket and reassembling the heat sink and fan and the mobo does everything else?



#4 jonuk76

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 10:12 PM

Yes that should be it.  I would personally clear the CMOS after installing the new processor to return the motherboard to its default state.  I would also note or take pictures of the various BIOS screens before doing this so I could refer to them if necessary (just an extra bit of caution in case of any problems).  The CPU speed should be detected automatically by the BIOS, and memory will be set with default conservative timings from the memory's SPD chip.  If you have high performance memory installed you might want to then crank it up to the recommended settings.


Edited by jonuk76, 08 February 2014 - 11:27 PM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#5 tbarb

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:35 AM

Thanks. Like your picture idea.

 

I should have noticed the E6550 cpu is overclocked 10%. If I take out the old cpu and drop in a new one upon boot up will that just be overwritten/changed, or will that value (10%) still be in place?

 

Will changing just that one number in the BIOS achieve an overclock?  (putting proper parameters aside on whether it can or should not be done or how much can or should be done)

 

Thanks



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 03:12 AM

I suspect any settings in there will be cleared on changing the CPU. Some boards will give a message like "The CPU has changed. Loading default settings" on first boot. Clearing the Cmos will wipe them in any case. The QX processors have an unlocked multiplier so they can be overclocked by that method, as well as by changing the FSB. I think with proper cooling and know how you can get fairly large over clocks with those processors. EDIT Sorry I read it as QX9650 for some reason. The Q9650 is not multiplier unlocked. They can still be overclocked through changing the FSB speed. I used to use a Core 2Duo I'd overclocked by about 60% through the FSB.

Edited by jonuk76, 09 February 2014 - 03:22 AM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#7 rotor123

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 10:53 AM

Hi, A couple of things to keep in mind.

Going from a duo core such as the E6550 to a quad core you could find that the heat sink is to small. There is no way to tell from here. If You re-use it be sure to clean the surface that contacts the CPU with a solvent. I use Isopropyl Alcohol, 90%+

Then be sure the fins are clean too.

 

If You reuse the heat sink monitor the CPU temperatures carefully for a while until you are sure they are OK.

 

As others have said, You do not need to worry about changing the CPU as long as the BIOS version is new enough to support it.

 

Good Luck

Roger


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#8 tbarb

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:05 PM

Thanks for all your help.

Found a new Intel fan/heat sink specifically listed for the Q9400/@9559/Q9650 so it must be different for the quad cores. For $25 it seems smart. Now to find the Q9650 cpu at a good price and I think I have it together to try it.

 

Thanks again



#9 x64

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 04:20 PM

A couple more points - most Intel Boxed (retail) CPUs wil come with an Intel approved heatsink in the box with the CPU - that will save having to clean the old heatsink, and it will have the right kind of thermal paste already on the new heatsink, and you'll get a fresh, reasonable quality fan as well...

 

There are also some physical precautions to be adhered to.The system must be completely powered down - not in any form of standby. Both yourself and the system should be earthed (the best thing is to use an antisatic wrist strap). For safety however I'd recommend that the system is not plugged in (OK I'd probably do it with the mains pluged in, but then I've been working on systems for about 30 years, and have the experience to do so safely). Finally, the contacts in the CPU socked are extremely fragile, be very careful not to bend them in any way - even letting the old or new CPU lightly scrape across them could damage them (and you will not be able to straighten them again) Be sure to lift the old CPU straight up and to align the new one well before gently lowering it into place.

 

Good luck!






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