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Unknown Device


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#1 bwrighttwo

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 06:24 PM

I have had major problems with a couple of my machines recently. Problems in which no one can fix and I seem to have a difficult time explaining. I decided to completly wipe the disks with something other than my Windows disk. I have used it several times and the problems return. The program I tried was I believe was something called "Derrick's Boot and Nuke". I did not write it on the disk so I may be a little off. I can re-run it if needed. It is an ISO and it did boot and give me several options. I selected the one that is interactive instead of auto. It was called "Auto Nuke". The one I used showed 2 disks. The first listed was called "Unknown Device" and the other was a normal disk. When I tried to wipe the unknown device it did not even recognize it. It would do nothing when I tried to click on it to start. I then moved down to the other disk. Just to be sure that the app. I was using would actually work I started it and it did work. It let me choose a wipe method and let me start wiping it. I then stopped it and loaded my Linux Disk and here I am. I just wondered if anyone has heard of this before. Any input is welcome and appreciated. Tanks for your time.


Edited by bwrighttwo, 08 February 2014 - 06:35 PM.


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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 06:03 PM

Unless I am mistaken, the correct name for the tool you were using is 'Duke's Boot and Nukem' - near enough !  A very effective hard drive wiper and formatter.

 

The 'unknown drive' you found listed was probably either a CD / DVD drive or something like a memory card reader which Boot and Nukem will not work on. Having started wiping the hard drive you might as well go back and finish the job and then do your re-install.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 bwrighttwo

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 08:47 PM

Yes, I know. I am only using a Linux live distro at the moment. I can't figure out why both machines have this device. For some reason one of my machines (the one I did not run the disk eraser on) now says the OS is PE.  I have no idea why or what I did to get this to happen.



#4 dc3

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 01:47 PM

Darik's Boot and Nuke is the correct program.  It overwrites the disk to effectively remove its contents.

 

As Chris suggested, you really need to allow this program to finish running the overwrite.  This will provide you with a fresh slate to work with.

 

The following is an excerpt from an article on the Windows Website.

 

Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE) 2.0 is a minimal Win32 operating system with limited services, built on the Windows Vista kernel. It is used to prepare a computer for Windows installation, to copy disk images from a network file server, and to initiate Windows Setup
Common Windows PE Scenarios
Windows PE is a modified version of the Windows operating system that is designed to support installing Windows and troubleshooting and recovering an installation that can no longer boot.
Installing Windows Vista. Windows PE runs every time you install Windows Vista. The graphical tools that collect configuration information during the setup phase are running within Windows PE. In addition, information technology (IT) departments can customize and extend Windows PE to meet their unique deployment needs. Windows PE also provides support for servicing Windows images.
ImportantImportant
Windows PE supports the deployment of previous versions of Windows. Refer to your licensing agreement for restrictions or contact your Microsoft representative.
Troubleshooting. Windows PE is useful for both automatic and manual troubleshooting. For example, if Windows Vista fails to start because of a corrupted system file, Windows PE can automatically start and launch the Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE). You can also manually start Windows PE to use built-in or customized troubleshooting and diagnostic tools.
Recovery. OEMs and independent software vendors (ISVs) can use Windows PE to build customized, automated solutions for recovering and rebuilding computers running Windows Vista. For example, users can start their computers from Windows PE recovery CDs or recovery partitions to automatically reformat their hard disks and to reinstall Windows Vista with the original drivers, settings, and applications.
 
Not knowing just how much of the operating system was overwritten before you stopped I can only speculate that the PE was left intact enough to still be viable.

 

 

What is the make and model of these two computers?

 

Did you remove any devices connected via a USB port?

 

On the computer that you haven't wiped the hdd, can you boot normally or into Safe Mode to view the Disk Manager?


Edited by dc3, 11 February 2014 - 01:50 PM.

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#5 bwrighttwo

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 08:39 PM

Dell N4110 Laptop  i5 6gb

 

I did go ahead and run the Boot and Nuke completely on the primary disk. It  still shows the unknown device. This unknown device has always shown up as drive E: and is also shown as a mass storage device or some kind of Advanced Micro Device. When I plug in a SD card it then shows the E: drive as a Multi Card Reader as it should. I have plenty more on this topic but am trying to keep it as short as possible. I seem to do better with one or two things at a time.

 

 

HP Pavillion P6 Series   8gb

 

Just to be clear both of these machines have the same "Unknown Device" issues. I loaded the same disk wiper but did not start it and had the same issue with the HP.

 

This Machine(HP) is the one that I mentioned the PE thing about. I now know where I resolved that it may be running PE. I ran an advisor app. called "Belarc Security Advisor". I am sure it is mainly used to get companies to pruchase it for their network admins. I do think the free scan is pretty accurate. One section shows things(Versions,last used,etc) about the software you have on your machine.  All versions of software(same items that show up in "Programs an Features) show as Windows PE 32 or 64.  The part of the log that shows what OS i am using  does say Win.7 64 SP1 which is correct. I guess I could be wrong to assume the PE thing.

 

Iam fairly sure that the unknown device is some kind of virtual device from my network being compromised a couple of years ago. Another thing,.... this Device shows as being used at boot when nothing is plugged into any usb port.

 

 

 

 

Thanks to all who have taken time to reply. It is much appreciated.


Edited by bwrighttwo, 11 February 2014 - 09:04 PM.


#6 TsVk!

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 08:26 PM

Hi bwrighttwo,

 

Just to add to this topic. I have a multicard reader in the front of a machine that I am using as a test machine. I also noticed 4 additional drives under my computer.

 

I had BADLY infected the machine with malware (including rootkits) and needed to start my testing from scratch. When I booted with Deriks Boot and Nuke I still saw the additional drives showing as "unknown". Concerned that there could possibly have been some division of my HDD I went hunting for answers. I identified the multicard reader as the culprit and disconnected it from the motherboard. On rebooting I could no longer see the "unknown" devices.

 

After the "nuke" I restarted the machine, no additional drives. Reconnected and restarted the machine... there they were again.






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