Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

replacing BIOS battery in ASUS N61J


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,233 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:06:19 AM

Posted 07 February 2014 - 11:05 PM

This isn't a request for help, but more of a how I did it. It took me 2 hours to figure out and if I'd read about it first would have been that much easier. Basically it goes like this.

 

  1. remove the battery and both covers from the underside of the laptop
  2. remove all visible screws (lots of them)
  3. slide out the DVD drive, then remove the little screws revealed.
  4. remove HDD (pull tab to slide, then lift)
  5. remove wires from wireless card
  6. remove all screws from heatsink and fan mountings, unplug wires.
  7. Prise gently with fingers at heatsinks to release from paste, then bend fan up to remove heatsink and fan as one piece.
  8. remove the screw that was under the heatsink
  9. turn machine over
  10. release keyboard (little tabs along the top edge to release)
  11. release keyboard ribbon cable and remove keyboard
  12. remove all visible screws, release all cables and ribbons
  13. click up the edge of the front of the case and run your finger around inside to release
  14. voila! there's the BIOS battery. Replace it.
  15. reverse the sequence to put your machine back together.
  16. plug in the machine and turn on.
  17. keep tapping ctrl constantly on first boot to reset BIOS to original settings

Well, there it is. Definitely not designed for user service. I was blown away that I literally had to deconstruct the machine to a shell to get to the CMOS battery, but pleasantly surprised that it worked afterwards...

 

I hope this helps someone in the future.


Edited by TsVk!, 07 February 2014 - 11:22 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 rotor123

rotor123

  • Moderator
  • 8,093 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:04:19 PM

Posted 08 February 2014 - 03:33 PM

I hate to be the one to break it to you. Your experience is not unusual. They expect the battery to last longer than the laptop so it isn't easy to get at in many cases.

 

Also You were lucky, Some laptop motherboards have the CMOS battery soldered on.

 

How is the training going?

 

Best Regards

Roger


Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
Forum Rules,    The BC Welcome Guide

167 @ June 2015


#3 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,233 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:06:19 AM

Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:02 PM

My policy has always been to remove the RAM and HD's and throw laptops in the bin, at a certain stage. I can see the wisdom in my ways now.

 

Soldering a battery on the mobo... haha! That has to be one of the dumbest things I've heard of in a while. Our disposable age is a menace to all.

 

The training is a pleasure thanks Roger. The initial reading list took me a week to get through, and I could still be following links now if I chose to. I'm looking forward to moving through all of it.



#4 rotor123

rotor123

  • Moderator
  • 8,093 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:04:19 PM

Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:23 AM

The easiest CMOS batteries I ever saw to change were in Thinkpads. No surprise as they were designed for durability and easy maintenance.

 

It is official, I just took a look in the basement and my oldest hard drive is a 20 megabyte MFM Seagate drive. I guess I'm holding onto it since it was my first hard drive,  Not in use BTW.  20 Megabytes and I never did fill it up. It always had free space.

 

Roger


Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
Forum Rules,    The BC Welcome Guide

167 @ June 2015


#5 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,233 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:06:19 AM

Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:24 PM

last week I week I was configuring some new HP Pro 4540s laptops... You could actually replace the CMOS on them without using any tools at all. To get the back of the machine off you just remove the battery and then push the 2 tabs. The back comes off as a whole revealing the whole motherboard. It is the one of the easiest computers to open I've ever seen.

 

Hoarding your old computer bits eh? lol I guess we all have something to be nostalgic about.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users