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Asus randomly disconnects from the internet


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#1 Torenn

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 12:30 PM

I have an Asus with Windows 7, and my connection is WPA2. When I'm on this computer, the internet will frequently disconnect, and I have to troubleshoot problems to get it to work again. Sometimes it's unable to fix the problem and I have to wait a few minutes before trying again, and sometimes it disconnects so frequently that I just have to turn off the computer for a while.

 

This doesn't happen on any other device but this one, so I'm sure it's not a problem with the router. Any idea on how I can fix this?



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#2 zingo156

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 12:38 PM

Do you have good signal strength? You can check this by looking at the little bars in the bottom right corner of your screen on the start menu (like cell phone signal strength bars look like). If it is under 2 bars you may have intermittent connection problems. If you have full strength connection, I would recommend going to asus's website and get the newest drivers for your wireless card: http://support.asus.com/download/options.aspx?SLanguage=en&type=1

 

If you still have problems after updating the wireless drivers, I would suggest trying a bootable version of linux to rule out a software issue. Something like linux mint will work: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

If you still have issues in linux... I might suspect you have a card that is beginning to fail... Good news! They are very cheap and somewhat easy to install in most computers. If you can give me the exact model number I can further assist you in finding a replacement wifi card if it is needed.


Edited by zingo156, 06 February 2014 - 12:42 PM.

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#3 Greg62702

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 12:44 PM

What is the manufacturer & model of the router or Access Point that you are using?  Use inSSIDer (yes it costs now for ver. 4.x, but you can find older versions online at  http://www.metageek.net/support/metageek-software-archives/).

 

Post what the -dbm levels are for your signal that your computer is seeing from the access point.  I can move the Trendnet TEW-690ap A/P into another room, or into my basement, and it will kill the wireless signal, between our devices and the A/P.  Where as if I use the other one with better antennas (5db on the better, 2db on the Trendnet), I can go anywhere in the house for coverage.

 

You may be running into the same issue as I described above, with coverage & antennas for the Wireless A/P, not really the computer.  It also helps to know what kind of wireless device is on your computer (manufacturer & model), along with what is the model of your computer.



#4 Torenn

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:10 PM

Do you have good signal strength? You can check this by looking at the little bars in the bottom right corner of your screen on the start menu (like cell phone signal strength bars look like). If it is under 2 bars you may have intermittent connection problems. If you have full strength connection, I would recommend going to asus's website and get the newest drivers for your wireless card: http://support.asus.com/download/options.aspx?SLanguage=en&type=1

 

If you still have problems after updating the wireless drivers, I would suggest trying a bootable version of linux to rule out a software issue. Something like linux mint will work: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

If you still have issues in linux... I might suspect you have a card that is beginning to fail... Good news! They are very cheap and somewhat easy to install in most computers. If you can give me the exact model number I can further assist you in finding a replacement wifi card if it is needed.

((Sorry I took so long to reply! I couldn't figure something out on the Asus website and I gave up for a while))

How do I know which drivers to install, though? I'm sorry, I'm not very bright when it comes to these things.

 

Also, I looked at my network adapters and tried to update them (since one of the issues the troubleshooting would detect with the disconnections was "problem with wireless network adapter") but it told me they were up to date.


Edited by Torenn, 28 February 2014 - 09:12 PM.


#5 zingo156

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 09:54 PM

You should be able to find the asus model number on the bottom of the computer (if it is a laptop, I assume it is) then enter that model number into the site I posted above and search for the wireless driver. The other thing I would recommend is getting all of the windows updates, there may already be an update that will install automatically. Here is a few ways to start updates: http://www.askdavetaylor.com/force_windows_update_microsoft_windows_7_win7/

 

Get all of them, you may have to restart a few times and it may take a few hours to complete. You will need to keep checking until it says: there are no more updates available.


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#6 Torenn

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 09:30 PM

You should be able to find the asus model number on the bottom of the computer (if it is a laptop, I assume it is) then enter that model number into the site I posted above and search for the wireless driver. The other thing I would recommend is getting all of the windows updates, there may already be an update that will install automatically. Here is a few ways to start updates: http://www.askdavetaylor.com/force_windows_update_microsoft_windows_7_win7/

 

Get all of them, you may have to restart a few times and it may take a few hours to complete. You will need to keep checking until it says: there are no more updates available.

 

Yes, I entered the model number and looked at the wireless drivers, but I don't know which ones to install. I tried to install one of them but I got an error of some kind. How do I know which ones to install, there's quite a few of them.

 

As for the windows updates, there were only a few "optional" updates available. Just some Bing related stuff, and I don't even use Bing. I'm downloading them anyway though, might as well. But all the "important" updates have already been installed.



#7 zingo156

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 08:17 AM

If you go into device manager: from your start menu search programs and files bar: type in device manager and hit enter. Then in the new window which should be device manager: click the little arrow to the left of Network adapters, in that list it should give you information about your network adapter. This may help you find the correct driver. If it does not, right click on the device in that list that says wireless adapter and then click on the details tab, now click the drop down menu that says device description and select hardware ids, now in the value box below right click on the top value and click copy, then paste that value into google and do a search. You should be able to find the exact device by using the hardware id if it is not specific enough in the network adapter list.


Edited by zingo156, 03 March 2014 - 08:18 AM.

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#8 uByte

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 09:35 PM

I bought my wife a computer recently that was an Asus Vivobook S400CA and it did the same thing. It would connect and then start dropping packets if I went in the other room. What I ended up doing is swapping out the Wireless network card in it. I found one that I had lying around from an old computer and that seem to fix the problem. It would be a warrentable thing with ASUS if you are wanting to talk to them about it. That being said just google the model of your ASUS and add in wireless problems and you should be satisfied in finding other people with the same issue. 

 

Another thing you can try is running slimdrivers (available at slimdrivers.com). This is a free program that will scan and download updates to drivers on your computer. 



#9 zingo156

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 08:23 AM

A lot of the newer computers have a single antenna adapter where older models had at least 2 antenna's. The newer computers often won't connect in the same spots as the older computers or have the same signal strength and sometimes will drop the connection due to this. If you have good signal strength and you still have random drop outs, I would recommend replacing the wifi card. They are very cheap to replace and not usually difficult. The other option would be a usb wifi adapter. They make a few that have boosted range.


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#10 Torenn

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 12:14 AM

A lot of the newer computers have a single antenna adapter where older models had at least 2 antenna's. The newer computers often won't connect in the same spots as the older computers or have the same signal strength and sometimes will drop the connection due to this. If you have good signal strength and you still have random drop outs, I would recommend replacing the wifi card. They are very cheap to replace and not usually difficult. The other option would be a usb wifi adapter. They make a few that have boosted range.

 

I did try using a USB Wifi adapter, but it still had the same problems. I think it might be the wifi card itself that's going bad. Or the wireless network adapter (dunno if that's the same thing).

 

My wireless network adapter is Atheros AR9485 Wireless Network Adapter, but when I searched it I couldn't make sense of anything I found, I didn't know what to click or anything.



#11 zingo156

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 08:20 AM

If both a usb wifi adapter and the built in wifi has problems, I would test with a linux distro something like mint: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

You can download and burn that to a disc and then boot to the disc, linux mint allows you to use wifi. The other thing you could test with is with a different computer in that same spot.

 

It sounds to me like you have a signal strength problem. As posted above check your signal strength. How far are you from the wireless router? It could be a problem with your router or your ISP, have you tried a direct line to the router an ethernet cable instead of wireless?


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#12 Torenn

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:33 PM

If both a usb wifi adapter and the built in wifi has problems, I would test with a linux distro something like mint: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

You can download and burn that to a disc and then boot to the disc, linux mint allows you to use wifi. The other thing you could test with is with a different computer in that same spot.

 

It sounds to me like you have a signal strength problem. As posted above check your signal strength. How far are you from the wireless router? It could be a problem with your router or your ISP, have you tried a direct line to the router an ethernet cable instead of wireless?

 

So I clicked on the link and I have no idea what to click on now. Which linux thing do I download? There's eight different downloads.



#13 zingo156

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 12:31 PM

I would use Cinnamon32-bit


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#14 Torenn

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 03:24 PM

I would use Cinnamon32-bit

 

My computer's a 64-bit, would this have any compatibility issues? 



#15 zingo156

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 03:48 PM

It should not have any compatibility issues, if you would like you can use the 64 bit version. For the most part the main disadvantage with 32 bit is that it can only use up to 4gb of ram, this being a test, I wouldn't worry about it.


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