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Need Advise If Jumping To Win 7 From XP Is Worth It In My Case?


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#1 Phabeon

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:52 PM

Greetings,

 

I have some HP SFF computers..  2 dc7700's and 2 dc7800's,   they are all rocking on Windows XP SP3

(http://h20565.www2.hp.com/portal/site/hpsc/template.PAGE/public/kb/docDisplay/?sp4ts.oid=3459241&spf_p.tpst=kbDocDisplay&spf_p.prp_kbDocDisplay=wsrp-navigationalState%3DdocId%253Demr_na-c01163881-49%257CdocLocale%253D%257CcalledBy%253D&javax.portlet.begCacheTok=com.vignette.cachetoken&javax.portlet.endCacheTok=com.vignette.cachetoken)

Specs on the dc7800  are as follows:(copied from BIOS)

Processor Type:  Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 @2.33GHz

Process Speed:  2333/1333  <-- anyone know what that means? 

Memory Size: 1024 MB DDR2/667 MHz/Dual Channel  512MB x2

Harddrive: 80GB

 

 

They are beginning to show their age.. and so I was thinking about buying more RAM to speed things up..  Here is where my questions come..

 

1. I believe 4GB is probably the max this system can hold right, can anyone confirm this?

 

2. If I jumped to 4GB RAM, would it be more benificial on XP or on Win 7?  i.e. which OS would I realize/utilize the faster speed on?

 

3. Per HP's website, it supports to kinds of RAM [PC2-5300 (DDR2-667 MHz) and PC2-6400 (DDR2-800 MHz) Non-ECC DIMM Memory]

What should I get, the PC2-5300 or would I realize faster speeds with the PC2-6400? 

 

4. Best/Cheapest Place to get RAM based on the answer to #3? 

 

 

I looked up the Win 7 requirements  and it appears that my dc7800 would be able to run it with no issues..  Do yall forsee any issues or would I be best off just upping the RAM on XP SP3?

 

 

Thank You all in advance!

 

 

oNe



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:26 PM

XP can only recognise up to 3.2 gig of RAM, everything else is just wasted.

 

Those DC7800's are great machines, we have a stack of them here. They are all being retired from Win OS's now as we speak though. Not suitable for Win 7 really, nor viable economically -long term- to upgrade.

 

I've been loading Linux on them, which they just love and run as fast as the day we bought them.

 

(edit: we are replacing ours with MT6300's... cheap and relatively powerful admin machines)


Edited by TsVk!, 05 February 2014 - 11:36 PM.


#3 Datcoolguy

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 02:10 AM

Well Ts, i don't want to contradict you, but there's a 64 bit version of windows XP that allows more than 3.2 Gigs of ram.

 

Also don't even think of installing win 7 on your computer if you only have 1 GB of ram, it'll run really slow, believe me.

 

Anyways, i think it should work fine if you get 4 gb of ram, i'd recommend getting a x64 version of Win 7 if possible. Tough, i don't know if your system is 64 bit compatible, so i'll leave those recommendations to our fellow forum members.


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#4 TsVk!

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 02:23 AM

I think they use up to 3.5 gig of the RAM whilst recognizing 3.2 in the specs.... I was having this conversation earlier in the day with a colleague, I thought it was 3.2 and him 3.8, Google said 3.5.... I dunno. lol

 

Yeah, they are 64 bit compatible... have been installing 64 bit Linux systems on them.

 

Adding the cost of the Windows license, RAM and tech headaches together we opted to buy new machines... Even though it is 'possible' to run 7 on them, it seemed like short term saving and long term extra cost.

 

edit: OP, if you did put extra RAM in go for Win 7 for sure, both ram types are fine, just buy the cheapest.


Edited by TsVk!, 06 February 2014 - 02:30 AM.


#5 hamluis

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 09:06 AM

FWIW:  A 64-bit computer...recognizes 4GB of RAM...if you doubt it check your BIOS and check msinfo32.

 

Some of that 4GB is ALWAYS used by Windows to run certain processes, including onboard video RAM (if applicable).  These processes are not taken into account when Windows posts its RAM figure when going to My Computer/Properties...so Windows reports a figure that does not reflect the physical RAM installed...nor does it really reflect the RAM used by the system.  It reflects the RAM available to Windows after deduction of RAM used by other processes and onboard RAM.

 

That's why different users with 4GB installed...will report different numbers reflected as "available" using My Computerr/Properties.

 

In any case...the number reported is only for RAM available to be used by Windows...for all other processes/programs.

 

The simple fact is that a system employing a 32-bit Windows O/S...uses up to 4GB RAM, regardless of what stat you are looking at.  32-bit Windows cannot recognize or use any more than 4GB RAM.

 

For anyone who wants to see a detailed explanation of what occurs, see http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive/2008/07/21/3092070.aspx and scroll down to 32-Bit Client Apps.  Excerpt follows:

 

"While 4GB is the licensed limit for 32-bit client SKUs, the effective limit is actually lower and dependent on the system's chipset and connected devices. The reason is that the physical address map includes not only RAM, but device memory as well, and x86 and x64 systems map all device memory below the 4GB address boundary to remain compatible with 32-bit operating systems that don't know how to handle addresses larger than 4GB. If a system has 4GB RAM and devices, like video, audio and network adapters, that implement windows into their device memory that sum to 500MB, 500MB of the 4GB of RAM will reside above the 4GB address boundary, as seen below:"

 

Louis



#6 Phabeon

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 11:07 PM

My friends.. I know and recognize the RAM limitations in regards to the OS, but thats not what I am asking..

 

I thought for some reason that in addtion to OS limitations there were also systemboard limits.. i..e.  the motherboard may only recognize max of 3gb regardless of what OS your running?

 

 

That is what I am asking.. how do I verify that max amount of memory for these PC's not regarding the Operating System..

 

 

???

 

Thank you in advance!

 

oNe



#7 hamluis

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:32 AM

Any given motherboard, depending on when it was made (in part), will support a given maximum amount of RAM.

 

The motherboard specs will reflect what that amount is.

 

The specs for a given motherboard or system...can be found by using Google.  You can use a tool like Speccy to identify a given motherboard in a system if there is no other way to get a clue.  Then just use Google to look up the specs for that board.  You could also go to the Crucial.com website, input the proper system or motherboard data...the result will reflect maximum RAM supported by said board/system, among other data.

 

Louis






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