Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Best set up for the computer illiterate?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 16vCorey

16vCorey

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:55 AM

Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:07 AM

I'm in the process of changing over some of our work computers (auto salvage yard) from ancient XP boxes to moderately modern Windows 7 units.  I'm not a "computer guy", but I'm literate enough.  My co-workers on the other hand, have very limited computer knowledge.  Basically I want to set these up so they're more or less fool proof.  On the XP machines I'm running Avira, WinPatrol, and Secunia PSI, and that seems to do a pretty good job of keeping things up to date and preventing these monkeys from loading the computers up with viruses and malware.  What would be the best set up for a Windows 7 machine in this situation?


Edited by hamluis, 05 February 2014 - 11:28 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to AV/AM Software - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Winterland

Winterland

  • Members
  • 995 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Land of Enchantment
  • Local time:09:55 AM

Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:59 AM

Hey there 16vCorey.

 

Here's my 2 cents worth.

 

I would move from Avira to Avast! (which is also free) and also install the Free version of MalwareBytes (MBAM), which can be found here.

 

Not sure if Avira does it since it's been awhile since I've used it (I left it for Avast!) but the free version of Avast! does some real-time blocking and even before I had the Pro Version of MBAM (which I'm running now) Avast! did a pretty good job of keeping me out of the weeds....since I don't always surf safe.  :whistle:

 

And, to keep things easy for your self, you may want to stay with the 2.0 version of SecuniaPSI since the latest version does not play well with Windows 7 which I'm running and found out the hard way.

 

If you need links to the 2.0 version, let me know.

 

And please forgive any typos, I'm out here fussing around on the Internets with a Live Lucid Puppy and it's a bit clunky.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Winterland

 


Photobucket removed my cool flag - idiots!

 

Every calculation based on experience elsewhere fails in New Mexico.


#3 dicke

dicke

    Paraclete


  • Members
  • 2,196 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlotte, NC
  • Local time:11:55 AM

Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:59 AM

Hi,

My thought is 'if it isn't broken, don't try to fix it'!

I think you can bring all of those programs with you to W7. If they don't need admin level access I'd give them limited access usernames so they are less able to make errors.

Keep us posted


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#4 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,597 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:11:55 AM

Posted 05 February 2014 - 01:28 PM

You may want to read some of the suggestions I provided in Supplementing your Anti-Virus Program with Anti-Malware Tools.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#5 technonymous

technonymous

  • Members
  • 2,501 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:55 AM

Posted 06 February 2014 - 10:33 AM

You can lock down a system pretty tight with Windows 7 pro or Ultimate.



#6 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,597 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:11:55 AM

Posted 06 February 2014 - 10:38 AM

You can lock down a system pretty tight with Windows 7 pro or Ultimate.

It would be helpful to the OP if you provide some examples for how he can do that.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#7 technonymous

technonymous

  • Members
  • 2,501 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:55 AM

Posted 07 February 2014 - 01:00 AM

Once 7 is install the first user on the account is admin. You can create another user that isn't part of the admin group. Using the built in administrator tools secpol.msc you can control the Local user/group managment security policies. You can lock down the users ability to do lots of things... Disallow File downloads, Disallow program install/uninstall, allow only digitally signed programs to be downloaded using the applocker tool. Regular users won't be able to stop virus scanners or alter anything with them once they are installed. The administrator installs the programs needed and allows acces to users if needed. By default users are blocked from a lot of things like deleting critical system files, and they are locked out from using cmd.exe, msconfig, taskmanger, regedit system tools. That's really the core security and proper way to lock down a system. With large networks a Domain Controller server is setup on typically Win 2008 R2, Win 2012. The Win7 machines logging into the DC has to abide by the DC's Active Directory GPO security policies. As long as you are signed in that's how they control many users on a network. it can also work across the world. If you use a VPN into the DC server again you are controlled with the DC's policies as long as you are on their network. That's the beauty of Server, Pro, Enterprise, Ultimate editions of Windows. :bounce: Did I miss anything?



#8 Didier Stevens

Didier Stevens

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,707 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:55 PM

Posted 07 February 2014 - 04:09 AM

Are you in an environment with Active Directory?


Didier Stevens
http://blog.DidierStevens.com
http://DidierStevensLabs.com

SANS ISC Senior Handler
Microsoft MVP 2011-2016 Consumer Security, Windows Insider MVP 2016-2019
MVP_Horizontal_BlueOnly.png

 

If you send me messages, per Bleeping Computer's Forum policy, I will not engage in a conversation, but try to answer your question in the relevant forum post. If you don't want this, don't send me messages.

 

Stevens' law: "As an online security discussion grows longer, the probability of a reference to BadUSB approaches 1.0"





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users