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Want to dual boot Win7 with Linux on a UEFI-based laptop.


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#1 green_orange

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:07 AM

Hi there bleeps :D

I got a sony vaio laptop, and it has windows 7 OEM on it. Tried to install Linux on it on another partition, and the installation was fine and finished. Then I got into the windows and used BCDedit to add a new value for the linux distro I installed. Now, when I boot the laptop, it gives me 2 options, win and linux... but if I run linux, it gives me an error and doesnt find the bootloader.

If someone can guide me through the process :) I'm ready to erase all my data from the HDD and repartition everything. My only aim is to be able to dual boot Windows 7 with Kali Linux.

 

 

Current partitions:

1- SONY partiton (dont know what the hell that is) ~260MB

2- Recovery parition ~20GB

3- EFI boot partition ~260MB

4- XXXXXXX partition ~300MB (has no name and i don't know what it is for)

5- Windows 7 installation ~70GB (C:/ drive)

6- Linux boot partition ~300MB (/boot)

7- Linux root ~12GB (/ )

8- Linux home ~40GB (/home)

9- Unallocated space ~450GB

 

**

Hidden partitions

NTFS partition

Ext4 partitions

 

 

Thanks, bleeps  :clapping:



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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:32 AM

I don't know Kali Linux at all, but I have installed Linux Mint 16 on a UEFI Windows 7 system.  Current versions of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSuse at least have support for UEFI.  For Kali Linux, it appears you will have to make a custom ISO with UEFI support - https://forums.kali.org/showthread.php?271-How-to-EFI-install-Kali-Linux

 

To install Linux Mint, dual booting with Windows 7 in UEFI mode here is what I did...

 

- Starting point was Win 7 x64 installed in UEFI mode, GPT partitioning scheme on all attached disks, and 100Gb unpartitioned space on one of the disks.  If you need to re-size existing partitions to create space use Gparted.

 

- Boot Linux Mint DVD in UEFI mode (this involves going into the BIOS, and in the Boot Override menu choosing the name of the DVD drive with UEFI in the name, as per below).  NB This is important - if the installer is not booted in UEFI mode, it will install in Legacy mode and this will not work if the existing OS is installed in UEFI mode.

 

1347270285.jpg

 

- Choose "I want to do something else" aka custom installation in the installer

 

- Created separate root, home and swap partitions (swap, if using, should be equal to ram).  The root and home partitions were formatted to Ext4 FS.  I allocated 20Gb to the root partition and the leftover free space to the home partition.  Mount point for root is /, and for home is /home.

 

- Find the existing EFI partition created by Windows 7, and set the mount point as "use as EFI partition" (or very similar wording, from memory).  Do NOT format this partition.

 

- Install Linux Mint and reboot when prompted.

 

If all went well, it should work and you will now have a Grub menu that allows you to start Linux or Windows.

 

Note I used the DVD, not a USB stick.  If you use USB, a lot of the third part utilities used to create a USB stick (e.g. YUMI) cannot be booted in UEFI mode.  But if you use the Linux DD command to write the ISO to a USB stick, this should work. For example:

dd if=/path/to/file.iso of=/dev/sdb  Substitute /path/to/file.iso for where your .iso is located, and /dev/sdb for whatever the USB stick is mounted as.

 

Hope this helps..  Sorry I couldn't be more specific about Kali Linux.


Edited by jonuk76, 30 January 2014 - 05:56 AM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#3 Greg62702

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 08:19 AM

This applies regardless of the distro http://lifehacker.com/5403100/dual+boot-windows-7-and-ubuntu-in-perfect-harmony



#4 green_orange

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 04:54 PM

Thanks :) but I don't think that this works in my case (UEFI)

 

Current versions of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSuse at least have support for UEFI.

- Boot Linux Mint DVD in UEFI mode (this involves going into the BIOS, and in the Boot Override menu choosing the name of the DVD drive with UEFI in the name, as per below).  NB This is important - if the installer is not booted in UEFI mode, it will install in Legacy mode and this will not work if the existing OS is installed in UEFI mode.

:D

I downloaded Linux Mint already, will burn and install in a few :)

The step you mentioned there is the one I was missing... I was booting the USB-disk installer in Legacy mode.

Thanks for the great effort :)



#5 Greg62702

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 06:11 PM

You cannot use UEFI with Windows 7.  It only applies to Server 2k12 & Windows 8.x only.



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 07:43 PM

 

Thanks :) but I don't think that this works in my case (UEFI)

 

Current versions of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSuse at least have support for UEFI.

- Boot Linux Mint DVD in UEFI mode (this involves going into the BIOS, and in the Boot Override menu choosing the name of the DVD drive with UEFI in the name, as per below).  NB This is important - if the installer is not booted in UEFI mode, it will install in Legacy mode and this will not work if the existing OS is installed in UEFI mode.

:D

I downloaded Linux Mint already, will burn and install in a few :)

The step you mentioned there is the one I was missing... I was booting the USB-disk installer in Legacy mode.

Thanks for the great effort :)

 

 

Let us know how you get on :)

 

 

You cannot use UEFI with Windows 7.  It only applies to Server 2k12 & Windows 8.x only.

 

Well there's two here who would say otherwise (myself and the OP) as we've actually installed Windows 7 in UEFI mode.  Only the 64 bit version supports UEFI.  More here - http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/186875-uefi-unified-extensible-firmware-interface-install-windows-7-a.html


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#7 green_orange

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 08:09 PM

You cannot use UEFI with Windows 7.  It only applies to Server 2k12 & Windows 8.x only.

 

Funny thing is, I am already using it and that's not my issue :P

The laptop came with win7 x64 booting by UEFI on it.

 

Let us know how you get on :)

I'm stuck in the beginning :P I burnt the latest linux mint 64bit iso on a dvd and tried to use it.

I got some issues here.

First, I can't find the option we talked about earlier (booting the dvd in uefi mode). When starting the laptop, I press F2 to go into setup, then I choose the boot mode "UEFI" (the laptop came from the factory this way) then I reboot.

The only other thing that can be changed from "setup" is the boot order, and there are 3 things that can have their orders changed,,, Internal HDD, Optical disk drive and External Storage.

So I put the ODD in first place and rebooted.

It got me a GRUB menu that says

"Start mint x64

Start mint x64 (compatibility mode)

Check memory"

And there was a 4th option that I cant remember.

So I started mint x64 and found on the desktop an icon saying "Install Linux Mint". I double clicked it and followed the steps to find out that it hangs in the 4th step :( right after choosing the internet connection.

Nothing works out.

Tried that compatibilty mode.

Tried to force quit and retry.

Tried to close internet connection.

Will try to burn the ISO to a USB stick and try it.

Will post here.



#8 jonuk76

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 09:09 PM

UEFI BIOS's vary and yours is probably different from the ones I've used.  But, if it is set to boot in UEFI mode only, then I suspect it will boot the DVD in UEFI mode (it does sound like it from what you describe).  It's when you have "Legacy AND UEFI" boot enabled (an option in some BIOS's) that you need to select which type you want manually.  There's a few examples of BIOS's shown in the Ubuntu guide here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI (this is the guide I used to do the install myself originally, as Mint is basically modified Ubuntu)

 

One clue as to whether the DVD is booting in UEFI mode is the screen you see when it first boots up...

 

If it's a plain black Grub2 style boot loader - that is UEFI mode

If it's a Green/white (Mint colour scheme) graphical screen - that is Legacy mode

 

Re. the Mint GRUB menu - is the fourth option "Check installation media" or similar?  It might be worth doing that to check it's burned properly.

 

When the installer hung, was that before or after the partitions had been set up?  Did you use the "Do something else" option?  I have run into issues with the installer crashing on this distro, but it was installation media related in my case.  There's a few threads on the Mint forum about installer crashes.  This one mentions something about the internet connection...


7sbvuf-6.png


#9 green_orange

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 10:52 PM

UEFI BIOS's vary and yours is probably different from the ones I've used.  But, if it is set to boot in UEFI mode only, then I suspect it will boot the DVD in UEFI mode (it does sound like it from what you describe).  It's when you have "Legacy AND UEFI" boot enabled (an option in some BIOS's) that you need to select which type you want manually.  There's a few examples of BIOS's shown in the Ubuntu guide here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI (this is the guide I used to do the install myself originally, as Mint is basically modified Ubuntu)

 

One clue as to whether the DVD is booting in UEFI mode is the screen you see when it first boots up...

 

If it's a plain black Grub2 style boot loader - that is UEFI mode

If it's a Green/white (Mint colour scheme) graphical screen - that is Legacy mode

 

Re. the Mint GRUB menu - is the fourth option "Check installation media" or similar?  It might be worth doing that to check it's burned properly.

 

When the installer hung, was that before or after the partitions had been set up?  Did you use the "Do something else" option?  I have run into issues with the installer crashing on this distro, but it was installation media related in my case.  There's a few threads on the Mint forum about installer crashes.  This one mentions something about the internet connection...

I made sure that the dvd is intact and the data on it is 100% verified.

I burnt mint to a USB stick, but it didn't boot properly :( it got me to a dos-like screen saying "GRUB version 2.0 bash-like commands are allowed 7ubuntu" ... dahell?  :smash:

Anyways, I kept with the trial and error (since the last post :( ) and now I have got somewhere :)

I modified Kali Linux and put it on a USB and now it gets to install in a UEFI mode. but it refuses to add the GRUB2 bootloader to the existing EFI partition that win7 had already created.

So, I will now delete that partition and create one for Kali Linux. That way I will be able to boot Kali Linux only (through GRUB2), then I will modify the GRUB2 menu to boot windows too :)

I hope it will work.



#10 green_orange

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 03:57 AM

absolutely-tired_o_442509.jpg

Finally got it to work using rEFIned.

Thanks alot for helping me, jonuk76 and Greg62702.

I want to mark this thread as closed or something :D



#11 jonuk76

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 07:01 AM

What a nightmare that turned out to be!!  Did you end up with Mint or Kali or something else?

 

Some interesting info on the rEFIned page, thanks for that.  I hadn't heard of it, but it looks like a useful tool.  It seems to confirm what I've suspected - that some UEFI implementations (particularly early ones) are pretty much useless...


7sbvuf-6.png


#12 Greg62702

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 08:31 AM

I was thinking that the OP had 1st Gen UEFI.  I know that a lot of people were loading OS-X on their machines, that were 1st Gen.  Have not heard much about this current generation of UEFI.  I have found that the current version of UEFI, does not play nicely with the latest Linux distros, so you have to turn it off, and go into the older Bios mode.

 

After my brother introduced me to Xubuntu, I stopped using Mint.  I was using Ubuntu for a while a couple of years ago.  It got to the point with the latest version of Ubuntu and other distros, that the Realtek wireless chipset does not work properly with the Kernel.  I am going to wait and see what comes out with the next LTS, to see if they fixed the problem with Realtek & Intel chipsets.


Edited by Greg62702, 31 January 2014 - 08:33 AM.


#13 green_orange

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 04:27 AM

What a nightmare that turned out to be!!  Did you end up with Mint or Kali or something else?

 

Some interesting info on the rEFIned page, thanks for that.  I hadn't heard of it, but it looks like a useful tool.  It seems to confirm what I've suspected - that some UEFI implementations (particularly early ones) are pretty much useless...

Yup and Yup :D

I have Kali now (and I can install Mint, Ubuntu, and anything else).

And the info on the rEFIned page is genuine, that's some info that sure will come to use someday.

 

I was thinking that the OP had 1st Gen UEFI.  I know that a lot of people were loading OS-X on their machines, that were 1st Gen.  Have not heard much about this current generation of UEFI.  I have found that the current version of UEFI, does not play nicely with the latest Linux distros, so you have to turn it off, and go into the older Bios mode.

I'm on the new gen yea. Not on a mac btw :)



#14 Greg62702

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 01:02 PM

Did not state that you were using a Mac computer.  Re-read what I posted, then assuming differently then what I wrote.






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