Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

T or F: Your OEM license for Windows XP dies when your system dies.


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 peterk312

peterk312

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 08:02 AM

This question has been asked by countless people, and the Internet is filled with a wild array of answers.

 

If you bought an HP system many years ago, and it came with Windows XP, and you have the re-installation disc, if your system dies or needs to be recommissioned because it's unreliable, can't you use the re-installation disc to install the OS onto the new system? I've heard some limitations are involved but I don't know fact from fiction on these:

 

1. You can reinstall only IF you upgrade the system with the same motherboard because the key for the install is tied to the serial number of the motherboard.

 

2. You can reinstall only if you move the hard drive of the old system to the new one (which for me would be impossible because the old drive is IDE and the new one is SATA).

 

3. You can reinstall only if the new computer is a model from the same vendor (e.g., if you have the reinstall disc for a Dell computer it will only work in another Dell computer).

 

4. If you call MS customer support and explain that your system's motherboard has died they will "reactivate" the license for you on the new system.

 

5. You can't do it in any scenario because your EULA will state that you agreed to install the OS on the one computer and agreed it would not be used on another system.

 

Anybody have any definitive answers on this issue?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,556 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:07:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 12:14 PM

True...simple answer to your topic title.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 29 January 2014 - 12:15 PM.


#3 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,809 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:05:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:09 PM

As Louis posted, the topic title is true.  But it really isn't quite that black and white.

 

There can be extenuating circumstances where the rules can be relaxed.  What happens if your motherboard dies, and you purchase a off the shelf ATX form factor motherboard which will allow you to use the CPU and RAM from the OEM board and install it?  Technically this is still the original computer.  I had this happen to me years ago with a HP desktop, the Microsoft representative recognized this and activated the operating system.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,556 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:07:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:46 PM

As Dan said...it's really not so clear-cut in reality...but it is clearcut as far as the official MS policy.

 

My experiences with the persons responsible for Product Activation...inidcate that they tend to give licensees the benefit of the doubt, particularly for an O/S that is not the mainstream product which MS happens to be pushing at the time.

 

So, the answer is that you won't know until you try, but don't be angry if the personnel responsible assert the obvious.

 

Louis



#5 peterk312

peterk312
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:49 PM

Tried to contact HP today and ask them about my Windows XP license. A rep said the pre-installed  operating system is registered only to the original machine. When I said the machine is no longer reliable to use, she said what MS allows is once a machine has the OS installed, it can never be transferred to another computer. Another person who joined the chat (I think because of a language barrier. They were in the Philippines) even said "If you will re install the OS on a different computer, Microsoft will be able to see that it is a clone key code and will notify you that your OS is not legitimate." She said the authentication code (I think she means the Product key) is authentic only if you use it on the PC it was originally registered, and if you use it on a different computer it will become a "clone key." She went so far as to say, "The life of the operating system depends on the life of the computer it was installed to originally."

More details: "when you install an OS to a PC, it will be registered together with the M.A.C /physical address of the computer which is unique for every PC and can never be changed."

I'm skeptical about contacting Microsoft now. I get the impression that the license only allows you to use the OS with one device, and when that device is no longer useable, or if you choose to no longer use it because you assess that it's unreliable, you also lose the license for the OS, which is pathetic because I know I have what I need to reinstall Windows XP, and the disc does not have any ability to "detect" that I'm using the same Compaq system or not.



#6 peterk312

peterk312
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:50 PM

As Dan said...it's really not so clear-cut in reality... the answer is that you won't know until you try, but don't be angry if the personnel responsible assert the obvious.

 

Louis

You mean I should contact Microsoft? Does it all come down to product activation? The chat above suggested to me that re-activation with a system other than the one I had originally been registered with would be impossible.


Edited by peterk312, 29 January 2014 - 01:52 PM.


#7 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,556 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:07:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:56 PM

Well...HP cannot give a definitive answer on licensing that conflicts with the terms of their business relationship with Microsoft..;.so I have no idea why you even bothered to ask any HP rep anything.  The license and the O/S belong to Microsoft and HP is merely a distributor of the rights to lose such...by virtue of their installing Windows on their manufactured product.

 

Just as surely...no one here can answer on behalf of Microsoft6...because all legal question and execution of business policies governing such...all those things are the province of Microsoft.

 

Your skepticism about contacting Microsoft...just indicates to me that you did not want a valid answer to the questions you posed...because MS is the only agency that can honestly decide such.  MS reps decide what is going to happen on a case-by-case basis and they are official, authorized reps of Microsoft who are quite capable of handling the matters posed by your topic.

 

Louis



#8 peterk312

peterk312
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:35 AM

Posted 29 January 2014 - 02:00 PM

Your skepticism about contacting Microsoft...just indicates to me that you did not want a valid answer to the questions you posed...

 

Louis

I wish you guys would stop going there. Apparently every question I ask here should be asked at a different source for a "valid" answer. I'm skeptical to talk with MS reps because the chat I had with HP indicates I'm asking to violate my license agreement. Can't you understand this?



#9 peterk312

peterk312
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:35 AM

Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:42 PM

http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/licensing_faq.aspx#fbid=JzS_VgAxsDL

 

Q. Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?
A. Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.
The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the End User Software License Terms and the support of the software covered by those terms. The End User Software License Terms are a set of usage rights granted to the end user by the PC manufacturer, and relate only to rights for that software as installed on that particular PC. The system builder is required to support the software on the original PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade their PCs with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base component "left standing" that would still define the original PC. Since the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC, when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC is essentially created. The original system builder did not manufacture this new PC, and therefore cannot be expected to support it.

 

So Microsoft pretty much assumes the computer is the motherboard, and the OEM version of the OS is tied to the computer. Obviously then you can't transfer the OS to another computer.


Edited by peterk312, 30 January 2014 - 05:43 PM.


#10 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,775 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:12:35 AM

Posted 30 January 2014 - 08:57 PM

As you've observed, the motherboard defines the computer to Microsoft, and OEM license is tied to that, so cannot be transferred to a different computer, or the existing computer system with an "upgraded" motherboard. The motherboard can be replaced if faulty, with an identical or manufacturers equivalent motherboard, and Microsoft will re-activate the OS in that situation. I haven't known of Microsoft declining to re-activate a repair installation even if the motherboard cannot be replaced with an exact replacement, as long as the substitute is the nearest equivalent currently available, and is running the same CPU, so is therefore not an "upgrade".


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#11 bludshot

bludshot

  • Members
  • 657 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:35 AM

Posted 02 February 2014 - 12:26 AM


 

So Microsoft pretty much assumes the computer is the motherboard, and the OEM version of the OS is tied to the computer. Obviously then you can't transfer the OS to another computer.

 

Except I just did this a couple weeks ago (replacing my motherboard) and it totally worked. I didn't even have to contact microsoft (initially I thought I would) because the online activation instantly worked. Even if it didn't work, and you had to call them, the worst that will happen is they say no. They won't send the black helicopters.



#12 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,809 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:05:35 AM

Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:07 AM

 

 

 

Except I just did this a couple weeks ago (replacing my motherboard) and it totally worked. I didn't even have to contact microsoft (initially I thought I would) because the online activation instantly worked. Even if it didn't work, and you had to call them, the worst that will happen is they say no. They won't send the black helicopters.

 

You are correct, they will not send the black helicopters.  But if you don't get it activated within thirty days your computer will do little more that boot giving you the opportunity to activate.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#13 Union_Thug

Union_Thug

    Bleeps with the fishes...


  • Members
  • 2,355 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:is everything
  • Local time:08:35 AM

Posted 02 February 2014 - 04:44 PM

I'm not sure if this violates the EULA or not :whistle: but here's what I did with an old Dell system that eventually died which came with an SP2 re-installation CD--  I made up-to-date (SP3 & post SP3 updates, IE8, etc...) installation CD/USB's, installed XP on a Virtual Machine then activated via robo-call with no problem using the product key on the affixed COA.



#14 bludshot

bludshot

  • Members
  • 657 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:35 AM

Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:44 AM

 

You are correct, they will not send the black helicopters.  But if you don't get it activated within thirty days your computer will do little more that boot giving you the opportunity to activate.

 

 

That's not worse than them saying no, that's what (obviously?) happens when they say no. But perhaps not obvious to all readers...



#15 technonymous

technonymous

  • Members
  • 2,520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:35 AM

Posted 03 February 2014 - 08:32 PM

Or you could convert your XP into a VHD. Why beat a dead horse though? There is a Lot of open source linux out there to refurbish older systems and is way more robust than XP. XP will have Zero support soon so it will become a vector for hackers. I imagine there is tons of stuff out there waiting patiently for Microsoft to end support and then all hell breaks loose. It makes no sense to go through the expense and trouble to buy a new mobo for a aged system and then throw a aged OS on it. LOL Why not put that money into a new 300 dollar cheap laptop with Win 7 or 8 on it. Seriously you can buy a laptop for 300 or less at Walmart Newegg ect that will run circles around that old pc and old OS.


Edited by technonymous, 03 February 2014 - 08:55 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users