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Can other hardware destroy a GPU? +other confusing issues


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#1 Scrawny

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 12:45 PM

I recently decided to upgrade my PC. Did my research and ordered the parts (Everything but the PSU, RAM and a secondary hard drive were brand new). After trying it out for a bit, I ran into a complete system freeze during gameplay (Nothing too fancy, just Mirror's edge on high graphics). After restarting the system the same happened during a YouTube video, but this time the PC couldn't restart and had several strange colors and shapes during boot-up, including large squares and horizontal lines. It booted, but around the point where the windows loading screen should've been, it rebooted again in an endless loop. Starting the PC in safe mode would get me to the desktop, but the screen was filled with horizontal lines which would disappear as if being erased in  MS paint if I moved anything such as the mouse cursor over them. After disappearing, they'd just reappear somewhere else on the screen. The PC worked perfectly with an older GPU (Which I'm using now), so I sent the new one in for repairs.

 

Now, it's on it's way back, and I just want to be sure that it won't just blow up again when I put it back in. Any help as to how to make sure it won't happen again or what the weird lines mean or how a GPU managed to prevent the PC from booting would be much appreciated. I think the company I bought it from might get a little curious if I send the same product back twice in a short period of time.

 

GPU: GTX 780 (Blew up. Currently using Radeon HD 4850 as a replacement)

CPU: AMD FX-8320

Mobo: Asus M5A97 LE R2.0

RAM: A single Kingston 8Gb HyperX Blu, 1600MHz DDR3

PSU: SilverStone STT-ST70F-ES (700W)

 

Thanks in advance,

Scrawny



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#2 zingo156

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 12:48 PM

What wattage is your power supply? Video defects and hangs can be caused by issues with power, it is possible the video card had issues but you mentioned you did not replace your psu.

 

When power supplies fail they can take out every piece of hardware connected but this is very rare. I have seen a few bestec power supplies take out cpu's and motherboards.

 

Edit just noticed you mentioned 700w in your post.


Edited by zingo156, 27 January 2014 - 12:52 PM.

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#3 zingo156

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 12:50 PM

geforce recommends a minimum of 600watts for a power supply: http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-780/specifications

 

Edit: noticed you posted a 700w psu ignore this you should have enough power.


Edited by zingo156, 27 January 2014 - 12:55 PM.

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#4 zingo156

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 12:55 PM

It sounds like it was an issue with the card because the issue also happened in safe mode. I would not rule out a power supply as of yet... Either the card or the psu would be my first guesses. If it happens again when you get the 780 back I would run hwmonitor to watch the voltages.

 

Did you see any video artifacts on post before windows?


Edited by zingo156, 27 January 2014 - 12:58 PM.

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#5 Scrawny

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 02:05 PM

Did you see any video artifacts on post before windows?

 

I did, yes. It's been a while, but as I recall I saw two relatively large squares accompanied by a few thin lines. The squares disappeared when the windows loading screen appeared, but tons of thin lines appeared instead.



#6 zingo156

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 02:10 PM

If you saw issues on the post screen at the asus logo or whatever is displayed then it is pretty much a guarantee there was an issue with the video card especially due to the fact your current card has no issues. It is still possible it is power related but unlikely being you should have more than enough power. You can use a power supply calculator: http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

and maybe double check that with all of the hardware you have, the psu still has enough power.


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#7 Scrawny

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 02:27 PM

If you saw issues on the post screen at the asus logo or whatever is displayed then it is pretty much a guarantee there was an issue with the video card especially due to the fact your current card has no issues. It is still possible it is power related but unlikely being you should have more than enough power. You can use a power supply calculator: http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

and maybe double check that with all of the hardware you have, the psu still has enough power.

 

I did have one person claiming that it might be a problem with my system not getting enough power, but he mentioned GTX 790 while I'm using 780, so it might've just been a mistake on his part. I did a rough check with the website you linked, and the wattage oughta be fine, unless it's a problem with specific cables or something. I'm not too experienced with the finer details of PSUs :P

 

Thanks for the replies, I feel confident enough to plug my 780 back in once I get my hands on it.



#8 zingo156

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 03:41 PM

A 790 is 2 video cards in one i believe it is 2 770's in one card. It would use nearly double the wattage of your 780. That would likely require a larger psu. You should be fine with your current psu. If you continue to see problems then it would be a good idea to monitor the voltages to make sure there are no spikes or drops in voltage. HWmonitor can help out because it will log and report minimum and maximum numbers in the fields. I believe you should not see spikes or drops of more than 5% of the recommended voltage.

 

You can check out the tolerances by using this chart here: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/insidethepc/a/power-supply-voltage-tolerance.htm

 

If you use HWmonitor and see voltages outside of those it is possible it is power related.


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#9 Scrawny

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 03:53 PM

A 790 is 2 video cards in one i believe it is 2 770's in one card. It would use nearly double the wattage of your 780. That would likely require a larger psu. You should be fine with your current psu. If you continue to see problems then it would be a good idea to monitor the voltages to make sure there are no spikes or drops in voltage. HWmonitor can help out because it will log and report minimum and maximum numbers in the fields. I believe you should not see spikes or drops of more than 5% of the recommended voltage.

 

You can check out the tolerances by using this chart here: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/insidethepc/a/power-supply-voltage-tolerance.htm

 

If you use HWmonitor and see voltages outside of those it is possible it is power related.

 

Will do, once I can get a hold of the 780. Thanks a bunch.

 

One last thing I'm slightly worried about is the one person claiming it's a power issue, apparently he was actually talking about the 780. Let me dig up a quick quote, see what you opinion on the matter is...

"you are most likely experiencing the symptoms of an underpowered PSU. Your GPU (GTX 790) requires a MINIMUM of 600W with a +12V rail rating of MINIMUM 42A. Your PSU has a top rating of only 700W and a mere 46A on the 12V rail. Your PSU is not big enough nor is it good enough quality to run such a GPU as the GTX 780."

 

As I said, I'm not too experienced with the finer details of PSUs. Is this anything to be worried about?


Edited by Scrawny, 27 January 2014 - 04:00 PM.


#10 synergy513

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:31 PM

a 780 with an FX processor  x8 will be taxing  a 46a rail pretty hard. everyone likes to think that the newer hardware is less demanding and for the most part the lower the nm the less energy consumed, until your components gang up. most  performance PSUs are over rated 60 amps on the +12v. i.e corsair TX series. i saw this one odd PSU the other day, it rated 18 amps per 12v rail, but then it had 4 rails.


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#11 jonuk76

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 11:09 PM

Steam's prototype Steam Machine contains an Nvidia GTX 780, Core i5 and (SHOCK... HORROR...) a 450 watt 80+ Gold Silverstone PSU  :tophat:    http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Steam+Machine+Teardown/20473  You can expect the card to draw in the region of 270-280w at it's absolute maximum load according to this.  46 Amps @ 12v = 552 watts.  It's not brilliant for a 700w rated PSU these days, but it should be enough.

 

Just a bad card I suspect.


Edited by jonuk76, 27 January 2014 - 11:09 PM.

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#12 waldojim42

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 02:32 AM

Ok, here is another $.02 fwiw.

 

The card and CPU have a combined 34A power draw. In a typical system, you are looking at roughly 3 to 4 amps in supporting components (motherboard, hard drive, DVD, etc). If you have more than one hard drive, and an additional 1A per drive. Depending on the case, between 1 and 2 more amps in fans. Worst case scenario, figure on 41~42A in use. You say you did not replace the PSU? Depending on the age of the power supply, you have to figure in degradation. It is easy to see how the system could be unstable with only 46A on tap - and I would certainly replace that PSU. In the future, when shopping for power supplies, ignore the wattage, except to get in the general ball-park, and focus on the +12V amperage ratings. For example, my PC Power and Cooling Silencer 750W (several years old now) was rated for 60A on the 12V rail. That should be the target for a 750W PSU.

 

For your system, you should target no less than 55A. I would suggest looking in the PC Power and Cooling Silencer series, Antec HCG/HCP series, or Corsair TX/AX series. I prefer PC Power and Cooling, but each of those would be a terrific upgrade.
 


Edited by waldojim42, 28 January 2014 - 02:35 AM.

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#13 Scrawny

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 03:25 AM

Ok, here is another $.02 fwiw.

 

The card and CPU have a combined 34A power draw. In a typical system, you are looking at roughly 3 to 4 amps in supporting components (motherboard, hard drive, DVD, etc). If you have more than one hard drive, and an additional 1A per drive. Depending on the case, between 1 and 2 more amps in fans. Worst case scenario, figure on 41~42A in use. You say you did not replace the PSU? Depending on the age of the power supply, you have to figure in degradation. It is easy to see how the system could be unstable with only 46A on tap - and I would certainly replace that PSU. In the future, when shopping for power supplies, ignore the wattage, except to get in the general ball-park, and focus on the +12V amperage ratings. For example, my PC Power and Cooling Silencer 750W (several years old now) was rated for 60A on the 12V rail. That should be the target for a 750W PSU.

 

For your system, you should target no less than 55A. I would suggest looking in the PC Power and Cooling Silencer series, Antec HCG/HCP series, or Corsair TX/AX series. I prefer PC Power and Cooling, but each of those would be a terrific upgrade.
 

 

I'll keep this in mind, and PSU will definitely be the next upgrade I'll be going for. Cheers






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