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error message on start up


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#1 RcC

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 02:56 PM

Everytime I start windows 7 I get a message box that says

   There was a problem starting C:\Program   

   The specified module could not be found

 

RunDLL shows in the eroor box heading on the left.

 

I click ok and everything seems fine. Every program runs as it should and I receive no futher

error messages. This has been going on for a couple of months. Clicking OK seems to be

the easy way out but it has been bothering me. Any ideas?


Edited by RcC, 26 January 2014 - 02:59 PM.


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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 04:06 PM

I just responded to an almost identical error.

 

this can be a system file error... these sort of things just 'happen' from time to time. It could be more malicious in your case, but try this first.

 

open the command prompt as administrator (all programs>accessories>right click command prompt.run as administrator) and type

 

sfc /scannow

 

then hit return. let us know if this helps.



#3 quietman7

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 06:35 PM

RunDLL32.exe is a legitimate Windows file that executes/loads .dll (Dynamic Link Library) modules which too can be legitimate or sometimes malware related. A RunDLL "Error loading...", "Cannot find..." or "specific module could not be found" message usually occurs when the .dll file(s) that was set to run at startup or as scheduled task in the registry has been deleted. Windows is trying to load this file but cannot locate it since the file may have been removed inadvertently, during the uninstallation of a program or after performing a scan with security tools. However, an associated orphaned registry entry (value) still exists and is telling Windows to load the file when you boot up. Since the file no longer exists, Windows will display an error message. You need to remove this registry entry so Windows stops searching for the file when it loads.

To resolve this, download AutoRuns and save it to your Desktop.
  • Create a new folder on your hard drive called AutoRuns (C:\AutoRuns) and extract (unzip) the file there.
  • Open the folder and double-click on autoruns.exe to launch it.
    Vista/Windows 7/8 users right-click and select Run As Administrator.
  • Please be patient as it scans and populates the entries.
  • When done scanning, it will say Ready at the bottom and list all entries under the Everything tab.
  • In the top menu, click File > Find... and type the file name related to the error message, then click Find Next.
  • Alternatively, you can scroll through the list and look for any entry related to the file in the error message.
  • If found, right-click on the entry and choose delete.
  • Exit Autoruns and reboot your computer when done.

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#4 cryptodan

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 06:41 PM

It could also exist when a program installs to c:\program files and the short cut it creates is missing a " " around the full path to the executable such as the following:

C:\program files\application\application.exe" since windows cannot understand spaces it thinks the full path to the executable is c:\Program.

So the short should would need to look like this:

"c:\program files\application\application.exe" this would result in application.exe being ran correctly.

#5 TsVk!

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 07:14 PM

I thought he'd just accidentally appended the path...



#6 quietman7

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 07:59 PM

The most common cause nowadays is the removal of an adware/malware related .dll file that was set to run at start up when installed. Generally using Autoruns is the quickest and easiest solution, however, in some cases further investigation is needed.
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#7 RcC

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:51 PM

I ran the /sfc scannow and it found no problems.

 

I ran autoruns but the error box does not give me a file name just C:\Program.

I assume it does have something to do with a DLL because in the upper left in the

title bar it says RunDLL.

I did see one entry that was hilited in red/pink for WOT. The image path was C:\Program files\wot\wot.dll.

That is the only file in that folder. I do have Web of Trust as an add on in Firefox.

Why are some lines hilited in that red/pink color?



#8 redstripe3

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:30 PM

Many times just running ADW cleaner and Junkware Removal Tool will remove these dll errors from startup.  These tools can both be downloaded from this site and are straight forward to use.



#9 PanickyD

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:39 PM

I use msconfig to edit startup entries, or sometimes even the startup tool in CCleaner, but Autoruns is a good tool also.


After the game, the King and the Pawn go into the same box...


#10 quietman7

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 07:21 AM

MSConfig (System Configuration Utility) is a troubleshooting utility used to diagnose and fix system configuration issues. In the Summary section Microsoft says "The System Configuration utility helps you find problems with your Windows configuration. It does not manage the programs that run when Windows starts."

Although it works as a basic startup manager, msconfig should not be used routinely to disable auto-start programs. It is a temporary solution and not a good practice for the following reasons:
  • When uninstalling programs while disabled with msconfig, they may not be uninstalled properly and manually editing the registry will be required to remove everything.
  • Msconfig will often leave orphaned entries when software is uninstalled. When used to switch back to normal startup mode, these orphan entries can result in boot up errors.
  • Msconfig only allows you to disable entries. To completely remove an entry from its' list you have to edit the registry, or use a third-party tool like Msconfig Cleanup Utility or a startup manager.
  • Msconfig allows malware related items to hide in your registry which you may not see or affect your computer until switched back to normal startup mode. This could then result in reinfection of the computer.
  • Msconfig does not list all applications loaded in all possible startup locations (some entry points are hidden and unknown to the user).
A better alternative is to use a startup manager:You should not use msconfig to disable startup applications related to services. Doing so alters the registry and there are services that are essential for hardware and booting your system. When you uncheck a service in msconfig, you completely disable it. If you uncheck the wrong one, you may not be able to restart your computer. Changing the default settings for services can be risky and might prevent key services from running correctly. Only change the status of a service if it is necessary. You should only disable services using the Services Management Console (services.msc) where you cannot disable services that may be vital to boot your system.

The reason is because with msconfig and Hardware Profiles, you can disable services that may be vital to boot your system. With the management console (services.msc) you cannot. Also, msconfig, while unchecking the box, is disabling the service.

Windows 7 Why can't I use msconfig to change my services?

Black Viper's warning: Why can't I use msconfig to change my services in Windows?
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#11 PanickyD

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 11:42 PM

Right you are quietman. Color me guilty... I know better, but laziness gets the best of me sometimes.

 

Soooooo.... ignore my msconfig comment and use the proper software to edit your startup entries. Especially when trying to solve an issue.


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#12 hamluis

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 10:39 AM

FWIW:  A long time ago (back in the days of Win 9x) msconfig was the only tool that users could think of to review/manage startups.  They did not realize at that time...that msconfig did not necessarily reflect all startup items.

 

Eventually, industriaous developers came up with startup managers, which reflected all items and proved to be better tools for doing what was desired.

 

Louis






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