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sfc /scannow found corrupt files can't fix all of them


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#1 rickgburton

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 03:08 PM

I've managed to fix all but one corrupt file. I've tried everything short of reinstalling Windows 7. 64. I've tried to replace it with a known good file from my wifes computer using elevated command prompt. My last attempt was to run sfc /scannow from the windows 7 disk (4 times) but I have a question on the correct drive letters. On the first recovery option dialog window it recognizes my drive as F: In the command prompt I entered: sfc /scannow /offbootdir=c:\ /offwindir=f:\Windows then enter. It keeps finding the corrupt file but can't fix it. Does that look correct to you guys? Attached is the CBS.log after running the findstr command. Thanks for what you people do!

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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 03:36 PM

I just had an issue with my tower, I used repair option not recovery fixed mine up.  Also did you going back to an earlier date before the problem?

 

Phil


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#3 dc3

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 03:40 PM

Try a Repair Installation.

 

A Windows 7 Repair Installation will require a installation disc.
 
If you do not have a Windows 7 installation disc you can download a free legal ISO image of Windows 7 SP1 at  Windows 7 Forums.  You will need to download the same version of Windows 7 that you have installed,  This image is hosted by the Digital River store which is an official distribution partner of Microsoft.  This is a genuine untouched image which is safe to download. 
 
 
Attention:  If you do have a Windows installation disc, skip Part A and go to Part B, Step 1b.
 
 
Part A, Steps 1a - 6a
 
The ISO image will need to be burned to a DVD in order to create a bootable installation disc.
 
1a)  To burn a ISO file to a DVD please download ImgBurn and install it.
 
2a)  Insert a blank DVD into your CD/DVD drive tray, and then close the tray.
 
3a)  Open ImgBurn, and click on Write image file to disc.
 
ImgBurn1_zps715cb1c2.png
 
4a)  Click on the Browse for a file icon:
 
ImgBurn2_zpsaea72ba9.png
 
5a)  Locate the ISO file you want to burn, and click on the Open button.
 
6a)  Click on the blue arrow to start burning the bootable DVD.
 
imageburn11_zpse44f577b.png
 
 
Please note:  In order to boot from this DVD you may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so that the CD/DVD-ROM is the first device in the boot order, and the hdd is the second device.
 
 
Part B, Steps 1b - 10b
 
1b)  Place the installation disc in the tray of the CD/DVD drive, close the tray and restart the computer.
 
2b)  You will be prompted to press any key to start the installation, I find the space bar handy.
 
At this point the setup process will load files, this will take several minutes.
 
3b)  You will now need to choose the  Language, Time, currency format, and Keyboard or input method that you'd like to use.
 
After this is done click on Next.
 
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4b)  Click on the Repair your computer link at the bottom-left of the Install Windows window.
 
This link will begin the Windows 7 System Recovery Options.
 
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5b)  System Recovery Options will now search your hard drive(s) for any Windows 7 installations.  This will take several minutes.
 
No participation is required on your part at this time, wait till it has finished and the next window opens.
 
w73_zpsd5483f05.png
 
6b)  Choose the Windows 7 installation that you'd like to perform the Startup Repair on, then click on Next
 
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7b)  Click on the Startup Repair link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
w75_zps9941e858.png
 
For a future reference, there are several other diagnostic and recovery tools available in the Windows 7 System Recovery Options including System Restore, System Image Recovery, Windows Memory Diagnostic, and Command Prompt.
 
8b)  The Startup Repair tool will now search for problems in the system files.
 
If Startup Repair finds a problem with any system files the tool may suggest a solution which you will need to confirm, or may solve the problem automatically.
 
w76_zps3dd75d83.png
 
9b)  Startup Repair will now attempt to repair whatever problems it found with system files.  
 
Note:  If Startup Repair did not find any problems with system files you won't see this step.
 
w77_zpsd8be95eb.png
 
Important: Your computer may or may not restart several times during this repair process.  This is normal, you should allow it to continue until you see the Restart your computer to complete the repairs window. 
 
10b)  Click on Finish, this will restart your computer.
 
w78_zpsd49257fb.png
 
It is possible that the Startup Repair will not be able to fix the problem.  If the Startup Repair tool determines this, it may automatically run the the repair after your computer restarts.  If it does not automatically run the repair but you are still having problems with Windows 7 repeat these steps to run Startup Repair again manually.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 rickgburton

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:59 PM

Thank you for the quick replies gentelmen! The Part B Startup Repair instalation was my next step. The only reason I haven't done it yet is because I'm not having any issues with my computer, yet. It boots and runs fine. It's just knowing I have a corrupt file bugs me. Can you tell by looking at that file how important it is? Thanks



#5 dc3

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 10:54 AM

NlsLexicons0416.dll is a core system file, all system files are important.  Without this file you could experience BSODs, slow performance, computer freezes, etc. 


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 rickgburton

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:13 PM

Thank you. I'll run the startup repair and post back.



#7 dc3

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:24 PM

I'll be around.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 rickgburton

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:44 PM

I ran the sfc 4 times from boot still couldn't fix it. I ran the startup repair and it didn't find any problems so I ran it one more and still no problems. I then installed and ran the 64 bit System Update Rediness Tool. Still no help. This is one stubborn little system file. Here's the last sfc.text log. I'm going to try to replace the corrupt file with the one off the  instalation disc. Could you confirm there's only one corrupt file from the sfc.text and that the file path is: C:\Windows\SysWOW64\NlsLexicons0416.dll. The [ml:48{24},l:46{23}]"\??\  in front of it has me a bit confused. Thanks again for all your help.

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#9 dc3

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:40 PM

Verify and Repair Transaction completed. All files and registry keys listed in this transaction  have been successfully repaired

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 rickgburton

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 09:25 PM

I only wish that was true. Even when I run sfc command from boot with the installation disc it finds the same corrupt file. If I run sfc now it will say it found corrupt files but can't fix all of them. When I first ran it there were 5 corrupt files and it still said that at the bottom. That's the only one left. Stubborn little file! I just got home and about to try and replace it from the installation disc. I'll post back with the results.



#11 rickgburton

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 01:27 PM

Replaced the file with one extracted from the install disc then ran the sfc command. Still had corrupt files. The sfc.text shows the original other three corrupt folders but not the one I just replaced. My bad, forgot to give the \SysWOW64 Folder back its permissions after taking ownership. Ran the sfc command four times and have only one corrupt file again. I’ll replace it like I did the other one and get the permissions right.

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#12 hamluis

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 10:01 AM

FWIW:  If files lie on bad sectors...chkdsk /r is the only command that can attempt to overcome that.  Replacing said file just puts the new file on the same bad sectors.

 

I suspect that the same is true when attemping a repair install, although I don't know for sure that's the case.

 

IME, bad sectors can only be overcome by re-creating the system partition...where the partition is remapped and bad sectors are marked and set aside.

 

Honestly...if the files marked as being in bad sectors do not impact system performance...i would be more concerned about the fact that more bad sectors may be coming, as opposed to the fact that efforts to overcome files in bad sectors...are unsuccessful.  I'd run the appropriate hard drive diagnostic in an effort to check the functional status of the hard drive, which is more important in the overall scheme of things.

 

Louis



#13 Greg62702

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 10:07 AM

Did you try running sfc /scannow in Safe mode.  A lot of times, files will be locked, and it will not be able to repair those that it cannot gain control of.  Also depending on the manufacturer of your hard drive, you may want to see if they have a drive checking utility,  see if that drive is failing.


Edited by Greg62702, 26 January 2014 - 10:08 AM.


#14 dc3

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 12:17 PM

The following is from Windows Dev. Center.

 

 

The system file checker utility, Sfc.exe, allows administrators to scan all protected resources to verify their versions.

 

Chkdsk /r checks for bad sectors on the hdd and recovers any readable information.

 

 

You can use Seagate's dianostic too SeaTools to see if there are problems with your hdd.

 

Notice:  SeaTools for DOS will run on all manufacturer's hard drives, but may not recognize the hard drive if the Storage Configuration is not set in a configuration which SeaTools will recognize. 
 
If the motherboard has a Intel SATA controller the storage configuration for SATA must be set to AHCI.
 
If the mohterboard has a Marvel SATA controller the storage configuration for SATA must be set to IDE.
 
To determined how your storage is configured open the Device Manager and click on IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers.This will expand the tree allowing you to see your storage configuration.
 
If you need to change the configuration you will have to go into the BIOS to make the change.
 
 
Please download SeaTool for DOS.
 
When the SeaTools for DOS website opens click on I Accept, then click on the Download button in step #4.
 
This download is a ISO image which you will need to burn to a CD in order to create a bootable disc with which to run the diagnostic tests.
 
To burn this ISO file to a CD or DVD please downlaod ImgBurn and install it.
 
Insert blank CD or DVD into your CD/DVD drive.
 
Open ImgBurn, and click on Write image file to disc.
 
ImgBurn1_zps715cb1c2.png
 
Click on the Browse for a file icon:
 
imgb1_zpsbb69e759.png
 
Right click on the Start orb startorb_zps06e1f985.png, then click on Downloads.  Scroll down to the SeaTools for DOS download and click on it.  This will load the ISO image, you will see the information listed as it is in the image below outlined in red.
 
imgb2_zps3f021ae7.png
 
Click on the blue arrow (also outlined in red) to start burning the bootable CD.
 
Once the disc is created load it in the CD/DVD drive and restart the computer.
 
Please note:  You may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so the CD/DVD-ROM is the first device in the boot order, and the hdd is the second device.
 
Please run the long test and include the results in your next post in this topic.

Edited by dc3, 26 January 2014 - 12:40 PM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 rickgburton

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 04:21 PM

I ran chkdsk and the the sfc again after replacing the two files. I replaced the files by putting a known good copy of the file on my desktop. Navigating to the corrupt file folder (system32) and take ownership of the folder. Then move the one on my desktop to the system32 folder. The option window "There is already a file named.." select replace. That should work correct?

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