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I Cannot Reboot At All!


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Reena

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 01:20 PM

I am unable to reboot my PC.

I click RESTART . Windows logs off and shute down ; my monitor enters sleeping mode then the PC restarts as far as Intel Pentium 4 and it REMAINS there. I have to switch off att he mains and switch on normally.

Is there anything I can do to remedy this, please? It has been going on for some time so I cannot use System Restore.

My thanks in advance.

Reena


WINDOWS XP : Home Edition.

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#2 MagicMike

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 01:58 PM

Sounds like you have something not initializing properly unless you turn power completely off.
Since this is happening in the post stage you should first check for a bios update for you motherboard, this would be the fastest and cheapest fix.

#3 Enthusiast

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 10:26 PM

Boot the computer, and before Windows begins start tapping F8 - to enter safe mode.

Choose last known good configuration.

#4 ThorXP

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 05:37 AM

You have Windows XP Home installed the nest question is do you have Service Pack 2 installed? If Service Pack 2 is installed was it a separate installation or id it come pre-installed? Do you have a recovery disk for the computer?

#5 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 05:39 AM

The BIOS is a piece of software that lives on your motherboard. When you first start your computer, BIOS is what is running when you see mostly black screens with a bunch of numbers and giberish. It, among other things, checks all the hardware on your computer, and when it is satisfied that everything is in working order turns the computer over to Windows, and then you start seeing Windows load.

You are not seeing Windows load, therefore that tells me that you are not getting past the BIOS checking the hardware on the computer. This is called the POST or Power On Self Test. You are not passing the POST. Therefore you are having some hardware component fail, or at least the BIOS thinks it is failing.

FIRST
Let's look at some simple things. Make sure you do not have any disks in any of your disk drives. Then open your computer (after unplugging it from the wall) and check to see if all power cords and cables are connected properly to the various components. Then get a can of compressed air (at any computer store, or office supply store, Radio Shack, etc) and blow all the dust off of all the components and fans inside the computer.

Also, if you have two sticks of RAM installed in your computer, remove one. If the computer still won't boot, swap sticks and try again. At least this is a simple way to test the RAM on your computer.

NEXT
Let us know if you were having any troubles with this computer before this recent problem started happening. Was it running slower than before? Was it rebooting on it's own? Things like that. Give us a good history including error messages, if any.

Edited by Albert Frankenstein, 10 May 2006 - 05:40 AM.

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#6 Reena

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 08:36 AM

Thank you All. You have certainly given me plenty to think about!

The SP2 was installed from a disk provided by Microsoft. The PC is two years old now but is still quite an up-to-date computer.

I will have a go at what you suggest apart from the "last good configuration. The problem has gone on too long for that to be of any use, unfortunately.

My thanks,

Reena

#7 ThorXP

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 10:39 AM

Hello I see that you mmight have made some changes to your CMOS (BIOS) sometimes this can be a task but a fix for this is to get it reset to the manufacturers defaults. There are buttons to click in there for this but if there are settings that have to be set specifically for this computer the only way you are going to get this set correctly is if someone else has the exact same computer you do or by calling the Tech Support for the manufacturer of the computer. Calling them might cost some money but you will be sure the BIOS is set correctly.

#8 Reena

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 08:29 AM

Another point to consider. My thanks.

#9 Enthusiast

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 12:50 PM

Thank you All. You have certainly given me plenty to think about!

The SP2 was installed from a disk provided by Microsoft. The PC is two years old now but is still quite an up-to-date computer.

I will have a go at what you suggest apart from the "last good configuration. The problem has gone on too long for that to be of any use, unfortunately.

My thanks,

Reena


Last Known Good configuration
Last modified: Tuesday, August 10, 2004

In versions NT and later of the Windows operating system (OS), a copy of a system's hardware configuration and driver settings taken from the systemís registry when the OS successfully boots. This copy is stored in case a subsequent boot process fails, and the OS can use the record of the Last Known Good configuration to perform a successful boot. If Windows detects a problem in the boot process, it will add the Last Known Good configuration option to the start up menu.

This configuration record often comes in handy after the installation of new drivers or devices, which may cause system errors. Each time the OS successfully boots, it replaces the previous Last Known Good configuration record with the new one from the most recent successful boot.

It wouldn't matter how much time has elapsed as the file would exist regardless.

You will loose nothing by trying it.




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