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2 networks on the same computer


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10 replies to this topic

#1 flpvieira

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 01:41 PM

Hi there, i'm trying to build a machine that can handle two network connections at same time, example, while connected to internet it will be able to stay connected with an "intranet", that is only locally enabled, altough i had tried a lot of things like, double cards, virtual machines and many other things i couldn't find a solution to it because windows stay connected to a single network at time... can some one help me on this one?
 
 Thanks, and sorry for any misspelling, i'm brazillian and my english is little bit off...


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#2 Greg62702

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 10:53 PM

It would be hard to do, but it can be done. Seehttp://www.enterprisenetworkingplanet.com/netsysm/article.php/3724316/Do-More-With-Less-PortBased-VLANs.htm

Edited by Greg62702, 17 January 2014 - 10:58 PM.


#3 technonymous

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 04:20 PM

Is this what you are looking for?

 

Internet---------NIC1---PC1---NIC2--------NIC3/PC2

 

Set static IP's or whatever.

 

PC1/NIC1 192.168.1.100   (?)

PC1/NIC2 192.168.1.101

PC2 192.168.1.102

 

Now press Windows key and type ncpa.cpl and hit enter. Hold down CTRL key and highlite NIC1 and NIC2 Right click and select Bridge.



#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:30 PM

Set static ip addresses, remove the Default gateway from the "Intranet" adapter. You also wont need to assign a DNS entry although you will need to ping or browse computer by IP address. The default gateway only needs to be assigned when "leaving" the network such as browsing the internet. Windows will give you a warning when assigning two default gateways on different subnets since this will confuse Windows on which subnet the "Gateway" to the internet is..

 

IE

Nic 1

IP                         192.168.1.1

Subnet Mask       255.255.255.0

Default Gateway 192.168.1.1

DNS                     192.168.1.1 or 8.8.8.8

 

NIC 2

 

IP                         192.168.2.1

Subnet Mask        255.255.255.0

Default Gateway  0.0.0.0

DNS                     0.0.0.0 


Edited by Sneakycyber, 22 January 2014 - 06:30 PM.

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#5 technonymous

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:24 PM

Set static ip addresses, remove the Default gateway from the "Intranet" adapter. You also wont need to assign a DNS entry although you will need to ping or browse computer by IP address. The default gateway only needs to be assigned when "leaving" the network such as browsing the internet. Windows will give you a warning when assigning two default gateways on different subnets since this will confuse Windows on which subnet the "Gateway" to the internet is..

 

IE

Nic 1

IP                         192.168.1.1

Subnet Mask       255.255.255.0

Default Gateway 192.168.1.1

DNS                     192.168.1.1 or 8.8.8.8

 

NIC 2

 

IP                         192.168.2.1

Subnet Mask        255.255.255.0

Default Gateway  0.0.0.0

DNS                     0.0.0.0 

Yep you're right thnx for the correction. I was thinking why not just use a router when I was writing all that out and forgot that the octet has to be changed. oops lol :crazy:



#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:33 PM

:thumbup2:  Also no need to bridge connections. 


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#7 technonymous

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 05:47 PM

:thumbup2:  Also no need to bridge connections. 

Oh I thought you would have to do the same as like bridging two class c networks together. Kind of a shoddy way of doing it.


Edited by technonymous, 23 January 2014 - 05:48 PM.


#8 Greg62702

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:31 AM

 

Set static ip addresses, remove the Default gateway from the "Intranet" adapter. You also wont need to assign a DNS entry although you will need to ping or browse computer by IP address. The default gateway only needs to be assigned when "leaving" the network such as browsing the internet. Windows will give you a warning when assigning two default gateways on different subnets since this will confuse Windows on which subnet the "Gateway" to the internet is..

 

IE

Nic 1

IP                         192.168.1.1

Subnet Mask       255.255.255.0

Default Gateway 192.168.1.1

DNS                     192.168.1.1 or 8.8.8.8

 

NIC 2

 

IP                         192.168.2.1

Subnet Mask        255.255.255.0

Default Gateway  0.0.0.0

DNS                     0.0.0.0 

Yep you're right thnx for the correction. I was thinking why not just use a router when I was writing all that out and forgot that the octet has to be changed. oops lol :crazy:

 

Any decent Small business Dual Wan router will easily handle that.



#9 Sneakycyber

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 10:00 PM

Yes any decent dual WAn Router can easily handle, that. So can a custom el-cheapo router running DD-Wrt, Open-Wrt, Windows Server 2008 and 2012 with Advanced Firewall dual LAN Cards..... And so on. However its MORE work then is needed if he is not routing between the two networks. 


Edited by Sneakycyber, 24 January 2014 - 10:01 PM.

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#10 AV4Me

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 07:59 PM

If you want to have an Internet, and an Intranet, a local only network why would you need a dual WAN router, he would still only have a connection to one ISP. Any security purpose of having an intranet and internet would be defeated since you would be connected to both at the same time. 



#11 Sneakycyber

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 08:08 PM

Good point AV4Me.


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