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Two computers, one router, one problem


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10 replies to this topic

#1 jfahy

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 11:58 PM

Hello,

 

I have the following setup in my basement...

[wall cable jack]

[coax cable]

[SMC8014WN modem/router]

[ethernet cable]

[Asus RT-N66U router]

[2 ethernet cables]

[2 side by side Win7 computers]

 

Before, all our devices ran off the SMC; then we moved, and I added the RT-N66U

to push wireless signal through the dense walls of our new place.  It worked great

for about a month, maybe six weeks...

 

...and then right around the new year the right-side (LAN1) computer's internet started

failing.  Each time I powered it up, the system tray would show a network icon with the yellow

triangle and exclamation mark; mouseover message would be Network 3 No internet access.

 

I've tried lots of poking around with settings of the modem and the router (they both have

browser-based interfaces) with no luck.  My cable company, which provided the SMC modem,

says signals to the modem are fine and their responsibility pretty much ends there.

 

Asus tech support was deeply weirded out by the "one works, one doesn't" situation, asked

a lot of Windows Control Panel questions and none about the router's settings, and finally

had me go into the Device Manager and uninstall my Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller

(the computer's only Network Adapter device).  Doing that turns the yellow triangle into a

red X, but after a reboot the controller gets reinstalled...and works, but only until the next

shutdown.  To keep things working I currently uninstall the network adapter every night before

going to bed.

 

Any idea what the trouble might be?  I want to learn a little more about LAN/WiFi technology

and so I'm curious what sorts of questions you folks will ask about this.

 

The SMC modem IP seems to be 192.168.0.1, and the Asus router's IP is 192.168.1.1.

As far as I know those are both default settings so it's possible-but-unlikely that I've

messed those up.

 

Things I've tried which didn't appear to help:

Power cycling the modem/router/computer for a minute or so each, in several

different orders (but not necessarily every order)

 

In the Windows Control Panel, clicking the red X for "diagnose and repair".

(Don't laugh; on one of my older computers that's actually worked a few times)

 

Disabling the Wi-Fi on the SMC (didn't really expect that to help, but why not

have less interference if I can)

 

Resetting the Asus router to factory specs

 

Assigning the flaky computer a static IP (this is at the fringe of my understanding so I

may have done it wrong)

 

Using different jacks on the Asus router (when the problem is in effect, the left side

computer seems to work in any jack from LAN1 to LAN4, and the right side computer

doesn't get better no matter which one I use)

 

Thanks for any suggestions!

Attached Files


Edited by jfahy, 17 January 2014 - 12:16 AM.


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#2 jfahy

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 12:19 AM

When I ran MiniToolBox and created the results above, my internet connection was

working...bad, right?  Say the word and I can reboot (if history is any indication the

connection will be broken after that) and run the scan again.



#3 Kilroy

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 12:55 PM

Your physical connections should be:

1.  SMC to wall jack with coax cable.
2.  SMC to LAN port on Asus with ethernet cable
3.  Computers to Asus with ethernet cable

Now, I'd also change your Asus configuration, this is what I believe your issue is.

Change the IP of the Asus to 192.168.0.250 (the 250 can be anything between 2 and 254 but 250 should be safe to not have to change anything on the SMC).  Turn off DHCP.  Set the gateway to be 192.168.0.1

Set all the computers to use DHCP again.

Ideally I'd set up a DHCP reservation on the SMC for the Asus router to be 192.168.0.2 and set the DHCP range to start at 100.  But, for ease of use setting the Asus to 192.168.0.250 should put it either outside the SMC DHCP range or high enough up it won't be an issue.



#4 jfahy

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 12:56 PM

Thank you!  I'll try that this evening.  (My cables are as you describe.)


Edited by jfahy, 17 January 2014 - 12:57 PM.


#5 jfahy

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:14 PM

So I tried to do what RKilroy said but quickly tripped over my own ignorance.

 

I assume it's the LAN IP of the Asus router that I'm trying to change?  When I put in

192.168.0.250 and hit Apply I get a popup that says "WAN and LAN should have

different IP addresses and subnet".

 

Does that mean I'm in the wrong spot?  If I'm supposed to be changing the WAN

IP, going to the WAN tab in the router interface gets me a dropdown menu that

offers Automatic IP (current setting), PPPoE, Static IP, PPTP and L2TP; 3/5 of

those I've never heard of before... :P



#6 Greg62702

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 11:29 PM

What are you trying to achieve with the Asus?  Are you using that just for wireless, or trying to DMZ past the SMC?  Usually if you have a SMC, you are getting multiple static IP's from the ISP.  Who is the ISP that you have?  What you are also running into, is the fact that you have two routers trying to be what they are at the same time, unless you have turned off DHCP on one of them.

 

Now the sad thing is, that SMC is only Docsis 2.0 capable.  If your ISP is using Docsis 3.0, you may want to look at replacing that Gateway with a Motorola SB6141, and for the Router, get a Wired router that does nothing but routing.  For wireless if needed, get access points.

 

I have the TP-Link TL-R600VPN, and it does a better job at handling routing, then the standard gateway that my ISP gives out on lease.

 

I would definitely ditch both devices you are working with, and look for better hardware.  Especially if this is for a business.  Check out http://www.smallnetbuilder.com for best rated equipment.



#7 jfahy

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 11:49 PM

Just for wireless - we moved into a new place and the SMC's wireless signal

wasn't reaching my wife's favorite laptop-using rooms.

 

So should I disable DHCP on one of the devices?  (Which?)

 

My ISP is Shaw Cable (Edmonton, Alberta), and I'm afraid I'm not sure how to

tell what sort of IP they're assigning me.  I'm attaching a shot of the SMC's

status page; does that tell you anything helpful?

 

 

Attached Files



#8 Greg62702

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 11:43 AM

I would get a Motorola SB6141 modem to replace that SMC, then use the Asus as your router. If still having issues with reaching all points, get some Netgear WiFi extenders that use Power line. They will expand your footprint without having to run Ethernet and use secondary Access points.

Also you may want to change the channels that the wireless is on. inSSIDer is no longer free, but it does a good job in showing what other Access Points are around you, and what channels are congested.

I use Channels 1 & 7 on one A/P that is my Wireless an, the other that is Wireless-b/g for stuff that will only operate on the older legacy bands, is set for Channel 5.

I have found in my area, that Channel 6 has the majority of wireless A/P's on it. 11 not as many.

Try setting manually to a channel on each device and see what happens. But do use inSSIDer, to find the best channels.

#9 Greg62702

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 11:46 AM

They may be doing what is called a "Sticky DHCP IP". What that is, is a IP assigned to that MAC ID of the equipment. Only way to tell, is to unplug the SMC for about 30 Min's, or press the reset button, and see if you get a new outside IP.

#10 jfahy

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 11:58 AM

The Wi-Fi coverage has been superb with the new Asus; it reaches from the

southwest corner of the basement to the northeast corner of the main

floor consistently so I hesitate to mess with the channel settings.  It's just

my computer on the hard line that's having the trouble.

 

I'm waiting on a networking book so I can implement people's suggestions

a little more adroitly; will post when I have more news.  Thank you for all the

info so far!



#11 Greg62702

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 02:05 PM

You actually can download most of those books in e-book format, to use through the Kindle application on your computer or tablet.  Also most libraries have a lot of the Network books available for check out through e-book format.  Redhat has a lot of good networking stuff on their site, along with Cisco.

 

Since Shaw locks their equipment down, I would definitely get a real Modem that you own, and give back the SMC.  Plus side is that the cost that you are leasing that older equipment, if you are on a lease plan, would pay for the new modem.

 

Everything about Networking, I actually have learned on my own, by using Linux servers, and Router projects like pfsense, Smoothwall.  There are three good online network books available at http://compnetworking.about.com/od/basicnetworkingconcepts/tp/free-computer-networking-books.htm  Here are some more http://www.techbooksforfree.com/networking.shtml

 

Also check your local old book store.  We have one here in Springfield, IL, that every now and then, you can find some good networking and IT books in their stacks.  The name is "Prairie Archives"  This is a site that you can look through their book stock, to see if they have anything on computers & networking http://www.abebooks.com/prairie-archives-springfield-il-u.s.a/57645/sf

 

Looks like they have a good stock of Computer network books, and good prices http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?kn=computer+network&sts=t&x=0&y=0

 

I will tell you first hand, that the only way to learn about networking, is just by jumping in feet first into the fire.  I have been told by my wife at times, that I am to the point that I have exceeded what would/should be called a home network.  I warned her when I met her, that if she was going to let me in her life, that she would have to put up with my hobby, which was Computer Networking.

 

It has paid off when friends need help setting up their networks, or when they are looking to update their equipment.






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