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What is the Windows Server/NT 2000, 2003, 2008, 2013


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#1 AlexSmithFanning

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:16 PM

I'm pretty good with computers but I have never been exposed to an environment where I've run into a server OS, And yes I looked it up but couldn't find a straight answer. I just want to know, Whats the freaking difference, aren't they all Windows Operating systems. I did find however that I think one difference is that one is more graphical than the other.

 

 

    And sorry if this post is in the wrong place because I didn't know where to put it.     


I prefer Linux. Windows 10 is just to invasive for me.


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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 10:46 PM

They are successive releases of the same server platform... like 3.1, 95, 98 xp, vista, 7, 8 is on pc's OS's.

 

Compatibility with software and hardware is the main difference outwardly with these servers, internally the newer versions have many more features.



#3 x64

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 05:10 PM

I'm pretty good with computers but I have never been exposed to an environment where I've run into a server OS, And yes I looked it up but couldn't find a straight answer. I just want to know, Whats the freaking difference, aren't they all Windows Operating systems. I did find however that I think one difference is that one is more graphical than the other......     

A deliberately very simplified answer.....

 

The server OSs' are versions of Windows tuned to providing services over a network to the client versions of windows with which you are familar (usually in a business or other orgnisation). the tuning can be to do with the way the memory is allocated, processes within the OS are scheduled - important for performance. Server versions of windows include special network roles and features (not indluded int he desktop OSs) that can provide various services to these networks.

 

Users do not normally log on to the desktop of most types of servers. Only network administrators log onto the desktop, and even then only to maintain the server.

 

The server versions of windows may be used by themselves (for example to provide a central place to store files, or to control a shared printer) or to provide a base for other server software such as a companies email server of centralised database server software.

 

Computer networks within companies often consist of many servers. Some of which centrally administer authenication of users across trhe network and help to ensure that resources spread across rhe network can be located by the network's users.

 

Re your graphical point... Many windows servers still have a windows desktop (Windows server 2012 even has a Windows 8 style start screen instead of a menu), but Microsoft are trying to steer people away from using graphical tools on server OSs (after all the server is not there to look pretty, it is there to provide service to the network, and its CPU cycles are better directed there). So Windows Server 2008 can operate in Core mode which is administered through a command prompt. Windows server 2012 aso adds a semi graphical user interface which provides limited graphical adminsitration tools. Lack of a grapical desktop is not a defining feature of a server, but servers may be built without (or with the simplified desktop) to keep them simple (which is desirable for quite a few good reasons)

 

x64


Edited by x64, 16 January 2014 - 05:11 PM.


#4 AlexSmithFanning

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 05:52 PM

Thank you for the clarification TsVK!/x64


I prefer Linux. Windows 10 is just to invasive for me.





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