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How To Test Hipro HP-P3087F3 LF Power Supply


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#1 gwnail

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 12:34 AM

Greetings y'all

 

I have a Sony Vaio with XP MC that has been a pretty good machine until recently. She started re-starting on her own and so I replaced the RAM, video card and re-seated every plug I could find including the CPU. Sometimes it will come all the way up and run fine and other times it will boot to the Windows loading screen and then get into a restart loop. I have also checked for bugs, too.

 

I did notice that sometimes when it gets into the restart loop the fan speed will dip for a split second which leads me to think it may be the power supply.

 

It is an older machine and not worth throwing a bunch of money into but for a $20 power supply, it would be worth saving.

 

Thing is, I have not been able to find the voltages so, if someone would be so kind as to point me in the right direction, I would be ever so grateful.

 

I have attached a PDF of the spec sheet Attached File  Sony Vaio VGCRB34G_mksp.pdf   111.9KB   7 downloads

 

Thanks y'all



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#2 dc3

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:16 PM

Can you boot into Safe Mode?

 

Do you have the installation disc for the operating system on this computer?

 

If you have a multi meter you can use the instructions below to test the rail voltages.

 

 
Reading Desktop PSU Rail Voltages
 
Caution: Please read this before continuing.
 
 

  • Since it will be necessary for your computer to be on during this procedure, you need to be aware that you will be working with live 12Volt DC potentials, which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. 

 

  • There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges before touching any of the components inside.

 

  • If you are not comfortable doing this procedure, then I would suggest that you not use this tutorial. The risks involved are minimal, but are there nevertheless. Anyone who uses this tutorial will be doing so at their own risk.

 
 
There are two devices commonly used to read the rail voltages: a PSU tester, and a multimeter. 
 
The PSU tester is the easiest to use since all that is necessary is to plug the different connectors into the tester and read the results on the LCD display. The problem with most of these is that they only perform a pass/fail test.  They will not provide you with actual voltage readings.
 
There are a variety of multiple meters, but this tutorial will address Analog and Digital multimeters. The advantage of these meters is that you will be able to obtain accurate real time voltage readings.
 
For those of you who wish to know more about multimeters there is an excellent article in Wikipedia.
 
 
Analog Multimeter
 
th_analogedited.jpg
 
 
An Analog multimeter is a little more complicated to use. Both Analog and Digital multimeters need to be set to the appropriate voltage, but with an Analog multimeter, you will need to choose the voltage range and must read the proper scale. 
 
The Analog multimeter uses a needle display which moves from 0 across the scale until it reaches the voltage being tested. This multimeter has five major linear divisions with multiple scales to read a variety of ranges. An example would be three different ranges. The first is graduated in increments of 0 through 5, the second, 0 through 10, and the third, 0 through 25. Each of these ranges are subdivided into divisions that are graduated into tenths. In order to read 12 volts the 0 through 25 range would be the appropriate one. 
 
Because DC voltage has positive and negative potentials this device is polar sensitive, this means that if you reverse the two probes when reading a positive DC voltage it will read as a negative voltage. This is actually necessary to read negative DC voltages. The two probes are differentiated by their color, Black (negative), and Red (positive). To read a positive DC voltage, the correct probes must be used with their corresponding potentials (positive to positive and negative to negative). 
 
With the probes being used normally to read a negative DC voltage, the needle moves from the 0 to the left, "pegging" the needle. By reversing the probes you can properly read the negative voltages.
 
Digital Multimeter
 
th_digitalmeteredited.jpg
 
 
The Digital multimeter (DMM) is much simpler to use. As was mentioned previously, you will need to set the appropriate voltage. One of the advantages is that the DMM has an LCD display with a numeric readout, so there are not any multiple scales to read. Another advantage is that most DMMs are autoranging when reading voltages, which means that you will not need to set the range with these DMMs. A DMM will read both positive and negative DC voltages and display them correctly. When reading a negative voltage, a minus sign will appear on the display before the numeric value. This still is a polar sensitive device, so you will still need to use the positive and negative probes with their corresponding potentials. 
 
There are five different DC rail voltages which are color coded. The Black wires are always negative.
 
Yellow +12VDC
 
Blue -12VDC
 
Red +5VDC
 
White -5VDC
 
Orange +3.3VDC
 
There are only three voltages that can be measured easily without disconnecting the 20/24 pin connector from the motherboard: +12V, +5V, and +3.3V.
 
The +12V and +5V voltages can be read from a four pin Molex power connector.
 
Four pin Molex power connector
 
th_250px-Molex_female_connector.jpg
 
 
The same voltages can be taken from a four pin SATA power connector, but in order to read the +3.3V you will need to read this from a five pin SATA power connector as seen below.
 
Five pin SATA power connector.
 
th_sata-power-cable.jpg
 
To read these voltages you will need to insert the Black (-) probe into any of the black  sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the different colored voltage sockets.   To read the voltages from a SATA power connector it is easiest to insert the probes into the bac k of the connector where the wires enter.  Unfortunately the sockets of the modular SATA power connectors are not accessible from the back, so the readings will need to be made from the socket side.  Some probes are going to be too large to fit in these sockets, so you may need to insert a piece of wire into the socket of which you want to read the voltage of and place the probe on this for your reading.  To reduce the potential of creating a short I would suggest taking the ground potential from another connector so that the two wires will remain physically separated.
 
Caution:  It is very important to make sure that you don't allow the two probes to touch each other when taking the voltage readings.  This will cause a short which could damage the PSU or other components.
 
To get accurate readings of the rail voltages it is important that there be a load on the PSU. In order to do this I would suggest downloading Prime95 for this purpose. This program was designed to be used by overclockers to put a full load on the RAM and CPU to determine the stability of their overclocking.  Because of this it will put stress on the CPU and RAM which will create higher than normal temperatures.  For this reason I would suggest not running this program any longer than is necessary.  I would also suggest that an inspection be made of the interior of the case to make sure that there isn’t an accumulation of dust which would impede adequate cooling.  Pay special attention to the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU.  If there is a dedicated graphics card with a fan installed on it, look at this fan as well.      
 
 
Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  
 
Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

Edited by dc3, 14 January 2014 - 02:16 PM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 gwnail

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:26 PM

Thank you, Arachibutyrophobia!

 

That is what I was looking for.

 

Yes, I do have the restore disks and I can boot into Windows and in safe mode most of the time (especially if I am troubleshooting it). I have been trying to get it to fail all night and it is not cooperating. It wants to work when I get the probes out, ha!

 

The other day it would not come up far enough or long enough to boot into anything. It would get into a beep twice then re-start loop. I am about ready to boot it out the door...

 

Occassionally I get the following at start up here recently:

 

Multiple BIOS POST attempts have failed

Memeory timings have been reset to automatic settings

Press <F2> to Run SETUP

 

I usually just save settings and exit.

 

Thought maybe a dead battery may have something to do with that so I just now replaced it.

 

I am going to install Prime95 and see what happens and report on the results.

 

Thanks again, sir!



#4 dc3

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:59 PM

How old is the installation of XP?

 

I would like to have you run a couple of scans.

 

I would suggest that you run chkdsk /r, this will repair errors, locate bad sectors, and recover readable information.
 
Click on Start, click on Run and type cmd in the box and press Enter.  
 
You will see an image similar to the one below.
 
Screenshot2.jpg
 
Type in or copy and paste chkdsk /r in the Command Prompt and then press Enter.  If you type this in be aware of the space between chkdsk and /r.
 
You will get the following message:
 
Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process.  Would you like to shcedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts?  (Y/N)
 
Press the Y key, then press Enter
 
Restart your computer to run the scan.  This has five sections and will take some time.  Please don't try to use your computer while this scan is running.
 
A log file will be created which can be found in winlogon.  This can be found in the Event Viewer under Applications.
 
Click on Start, type eventvwr.msc then click on Enter.  Click on Application and select the most recent winlogon entry.
 
Please copy and then paste this in your next post.
 
 

System File Checker
 
The sfc /scannow command scans all protected system files and replaces corrupted and incorrect versions with correct Microsoft versions.
 
During this scan you may be prompted to insert your installation disc in the DVD/CD drive, if you have this disc you will want to have it available before you start the scan.  If you don't have this disc and are prompted for it you will need to follow the *instructions below for locating the i386 file. 
 
To initiate this scan go to Start, click on Run and type in sfc /scannow then press enter.  Please note the space between sfc and /scannow.
 
If files are found during this scan which need to be replaced you may be prompted to insert your installation disc, do so at that time.   If it doesn't ask you for the disc this means that it wasn't necessary to replace any files.   In the event the the system asks you for the disc, you must visit Windows Update immediately after the scan is completed (Please note that there won't be any confirmation dialog - the program will just exit without telling you anything).
 
***Warning, the steps below involve entering the Registry.  If a mistake is made there this can render your computer inoperable.  For this reason I suggest that you first back up the rigistry.***
 
Backup Your Registry with ERUNT 
 
Please download  ERUNT.
 
For the version with the Installer:  Use the setup program to install ERUNT on your computer.
 
For the zipped version:  Unzip all the files into a folder of your choice.
 
Important:  For the zipped version you will need a program lik 7-Zip to unzip the files.
 
Click on Erunt.exe to backup your registry to the folder of your choice.
 
In the event you need to restore your registry, run ERUNT from folder C:\WINDOWS\ERUNT\ (the date the backup was made shoule go here.)
 
*If you do not have this disc you will need to locate a directory on your system which is named i386. You will need to search for this in the registry, to do this type in regedit in the Search programs and files box and then press Enter, you will see a screen similar to the one below.
 
registrysnip_zps5dd5b3c6.png
 
To find this you will need to navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup 
 
You will see the list of HKEY options, please notice the arrow to the left of the option, when you click on this arrow the menu will expand and you will be able to find the next step “SOFTWARE”, expand the menu on this option and proceed till you reach “Setup”.  Under “Setup” you will need to find “SourcePath”.  The SourcePath probably has an entry pointing to your CD-ROM drive, and that is why it is asking for the XP CD. This needs to be changed it to C:\, to do this double click on SourcePath, a box will open where you will make this change by typing in C:\.
 
Restart your computer now and try running the scan again.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 gwnail

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:05 PM

I am currently running chkdsk and so far it has recovered 1 orphan file. It is at 11% on stage 5. Looks like it may take a while.

 

The machine is about 8 years old and I have restored the OS several times since I've had it. The last time being about a year and a half ago or so. Other than that I have had no trouble with it until now.

 

I installed 2 gig of RAM which is what Sony said it would max out at. When the current problem began I thought maybe the RAM was bad so I replaced it to no avail. I decided, what the heck and put all four gig in and it seems to run better and faster, when it runs (amazingly enough it is still running now).

 

I did not complete the stress test but it passed the first 2 runs and so far no voltage fluctuations above .02% on the +5 leg.

 

I will post the results as soon as they are available.

 

Thank you again for your time and attention!



#6 gwnail

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:42 PM

Chkdsk finally finished and I started the System File Checker and it is requesting the Service Pack 3 disk which I don't have so now I need to figure out how to make one from an .exe file so I can complete the scan.

 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

I am starting to think that a complete restore may be in order. As I think back, everything was going great until my wifes son-in-law (I don't claim him) installed some additions to MS Flight Simulator, and the use of CCleaner registry cleaner may have made things worse. One thing that puzzles me is that power supply failure should not be intermittent, right? Either it works or it don't, no?

 

Thanks again, sir!



#7 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:18 PM



1.  Chkdsk finally finished and I started the System File Checker and it is requesting the Service Pack 3 disk which I don't have so now I need to figure out how to make one from an .exe file so I can complete the scan.

 

2.  I am starting to think that a complete restore may be in order. As I think back, everything was going great until my wifes son-in-law (I don't claim him) installed some additions to MS Flight Simulator, and the use of CCleaner registry cleaner may have made things worse.

 

3.  One thing that puzzles me is that power supply failure should not be intermittent, right? Either it works or it don't, no?

 

1.  If you have a installation disc with SP2 and you have SP3 installed and are asked to insert the installation disc while running sfc /scannow and do so the disc will try to verify the SP3 files against the SP2 disc.  There are two ways you can go about making this work, you could uninstall the SP3, run the scan, and then reinstall SP3 afterward.  The other option would be to slipstream SP3 with your SP2 installation disc.  You can use a program like Autostreamer  to do this.  There are instructions for doing this at their website.

 

2.  Bleeping Computer does not endorse the use of registry cleaners or optimizers, in fact the use of these is discouraged.  The registry cleaner in Ccleaner if used improperly can result in damaging the registry which could result in leaving your computer inoperable.  Since Ccleaner was used on this computer there is the possibility that the registry cleaner could have been used which could explain some of the problems you are experiencing.  This coupled with the process you are looking at in order to run sfc /scannow makes the prospect of doing a fresh installation look appealing.  You haven't post the model of this Vaio, so I don't know if this computer has a System Recovery partition.  If it does this would make the process pretty simple.  You would need to backup you important data to removable form of media, like a flash drive or discs.  If this computer doesn't have a recovery partition you will need to use a disc to make the installation.  To make this process easier would be to use a program like Driver Magician to harvest your drivers so you can install them after the installation of the operating system.  This is worth thinking about.

 

3.  Regarding the PSU, all that you have posted about it is that occasionally you will notice a "dip" in the fan speed for a split second.  This by itself does not indicate a problem with the PSU for me.  

 

 Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  When the  FileHippo website opens, click on Download latest version in the upper left pane.

 
When Speccy opens you will see a screen similar to the one below.
 
speccy9_zps2d9cdedc.png
 
Click on File which is outlined in red in the screen above, and then click on Publish Snapshot.
 
The following screen will appear, click on Yes.
 
speccy7_zpsfa02105f.png
 
The following screen will appear, click on Copy to Clipboard.
 
speccy3_zps1791b093.png
 
In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 gwnail

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:15 PM

Latest update: Well, I could not get it to accept any of the disk that it asked for even though I had them on hand. It kept telling me they were the wrong disk, but they were the right ones. So, I initiated a full restore which went fine.

 

While in the process of re-installing my software it began the re-start loop and would not come back up. I connected my meter to the Four pin Molex power connector and voltages were jumping around wildly, even off the chart!

 

I assume that the PSU or mobo (or whatever regulates voltages) has finally quit. Unfortunately, I am unable to provide any of the information you requested other than it being a Sony Vaio VGCRB34G:

 

Processor
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 540J with Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology
(3.20GHz1, 1MB L2 Cache)

Front Side Bus Speed
800MHz

Chipset
Intel® 915G

Memory
512MB PC-3200 400MHz DDR
(256MB x 2)
(Expandable to 2GB)

Hard Drive2
200GB2 7200rpm Serial ATA Hard Drive

Graphics
ATI Radeon® X300
128MB Video Memory

Graphics
TV-Out / VGA-Out / DVI-D Out
16x PCI Express
Giga Pocket® MPEG2 Realtime
Encoder/Decoder board with TV Tuner

 

She may be old but she has been a good machine.

 

Thank you again, sir!



#9 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 02:18 PM

The Speccy would have shown the rail voltages, but these readings are only as good as the means of reading the voltages.  A voltage meter will always produce the more reliable readings.

 

With the voltages fluctuating like that it's pretty obvious that there is a problem with the PSU.  I would be nice if you could borrow a PSU to test the computer to make sure that these voltage fluctuations haven't damaged the motherboard.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 gwnail

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 03:28 PM

I have a guy that wants me to haul away 8 machines and I hope one of them will have a PSU that will work. Hope to get them tomorrow. I'll let you know what I find out.

 

Thanks again!



#11 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 03:30 PM

I'll be around.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 gwnail

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 02:15 AM

Latest update is that it was in fact the PSU. Machine is running great! Thanks again for your help, sir.



#13 dc3

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:08 AM

Glad you have the problem resolved. :thumbup2:


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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