Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

W7 Won't Boot, System Repair + Restore Do Nothing


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 TheJBizz

TheJBizz

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 04:01 PM

Hello!

 

This is my first time doing computer assembly. I'm running on a new motherboard (GIGABYTE GA-970-D3P), GPU (AMD Radeon HD 7870), RAM (Patriot Viper Xtreme 8GB 1600), and power supply (Corsair GS700), with my hard drives containing Windows 7 (1 SSD, one HDD) being moved over from my last computer.

 

When I boot the comp up, it goes to BIOS and then starts loading Windows, but then immediately says that Windows cannot be loaded, giving the options to repair the system or boot normally. Booting normally loops me back to that menu, and attempting repair ends up with the OS saying that it can't do it, restarting itself and bringing me back through the loop. Doing a system restore to an earlier point also ends up doing the same.

 

The BIOS seems to be at its latest update. I imagine it's the mobo drivers, but I don't know how I could install drivers if the OS won't even boot up.

 

This is my first time handling stuff like this, so I don't know what information is relevant. I'll try to provide whatever you guys need to know.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Problem_Solver

Problem_Solver

  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 04:26 PM

I see that the installed hard drive contains data from another computer, correct?

 

If the parts are different, you will have problems loading Windows. What is being done with the hard drive is like trying to put a square peg through a round hole.

 

I found a relevant post to your problem. This guy had taken a hard drive with data on it, and tried to move it to a different laptop:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/503834/hard-drive-swap-between-old-and-new-laptop/?hl=%2Bold+%2Bhard+%2Bdrive+%2Bswap+%2Bnew+%2Bcomputer

 

Any questions? I will do my best to answer them.



#3 TheJBizz

TheJBizz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 04:32 PM

I had no idea. I assumed if the motherboard could handle it and I installed some drivers, then I'd be able to move my HDDs over.

 

So is that that? My data has to get wiped for a new clean W7 install?



#4 Problem_Solver

Problem_Solver

  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 05:04 PM

I wish it were simple. You'd think as far as technology has advanced, this would be very possible and easy to do.

 

Do you have valuable data on this hard drive? Can you access your data with your old computer components? If you need help with getting your files, STOP WORKING ON IT YOURSELF!!! I highly recommend taking your hard drive to a pro for file recovery. This is usually simple. I charge $40 labor where I'm at for backups.

 

As far as moving the hard drive over, how much time and effort do you want to put into it?

 

Here's how I do it (As a computer professional)- I use the paid Acronis Backup and Recovery software with the Universal Restore feature. I create a full image of the hard drive. I clean the hard drive using disk part (Built into Windows). Using the Universal Restore feature in Acronis, I restore the backup image back to the hard drive - Now the hard drive has generic drivers and (still only about half of the time) boots properly. Then I install drivers.

 

It's not easy to do. It's very likely to not work, even if you do it right.



#5 JoeVehicle

JoeVehicle

  • Members
  • 104 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 05:25 PM

I have this same problem, yet I've been using the same hard drive for a while..



#6 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,714 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 05:27 PM

When you take a hdd with a Windows operating system installed from the computer it was originally installed on and install it in another computer you are asking for major problems. The excerpt below is from a Intel article which describes in detail what happens. The article also mentions a reference to an article by Microsoft, it can be seen here.
 
Moving a hard drive with Windows already installed to a new motherboard without reinstalling the operating system is not recommended.
 
If a hard drive is moved to a new computer, the registry entries and drivers for the mass storage controller hardware on the new motherboard are not installed in Windows for the new computer you may not be able to start Windows. This is true even if you move the hard drive to a motherboard with the same chipset, as different hardware revisions can cause this issue as well.
 
Additionally, moving a hard drive to a new motherboard may not exhibit any errors until you install new IDE drivers. This is because each chipset uses a different Plug-n-Play (PNP) ID to identify it. If you change your motherboard, your registry will have multiple PNP IDs (for the old hardware as well as the new hardware). If there are multiple entries in the registry, Windows cannot determine which hardware to initialize and therefore fails with a STOP error.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#7 TheJBizz

TheJBizz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 07:56 PM

Well, I guess I should have done more research.

 

The SSD is the boot drive, and the HDD is my drive with my data on it. Will I have to format the HDD to make it compatible as well, or will both drives have to be formatted?



#8 Problem_Solver

Problem_Solver

  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:13 PM

Only your boot drive - the SSD - must be formatted. Under most circumstances, your HDD will appear as an extra drive when you load Windows for the first time. Your HDD is already formatted in a way that Windows recognizes.



#9 Problem_Solver

Problem_Solver

  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:20 PM

If you do have valuable data:

 

Please consider replacing your HDD if it is over 4 years old. HDD are mechanical devices: factors such as time, heat, friction, etc, cause the internal parts of a hard drive to wear down over time. A failure is not going to be expected. A failure is inevitable. Your best protection is 1) backups, and 2) replacing your storage mediums regularly (Including backup mediums - HDD, USB Drive, "External Drives", etc). 3-4 years is a good expected lifetime for these devices. 

 

The internals of your HDD can be likened to an old-fashioned record player, but encased in a metal box that you don't open.

 

And be extremely careful when handling your hard drive. It is extremely sensitive to shock, among many other things.



#10 TheJBizz

TheJBizz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:11 AM

Posted 06 January 2014 - 11:29 AM

I don't think it's over 4 years old yet, but I'll certainly keep it under consideration.

 

Formatting the SSD isn't so bad. I guess having a separate boot drive was at least one good idea. It's just unfortunate because I used a friend's install of W7, and I think you only get 3 installs per copy. I'll have to find a way, I suppose.

 

Edit: You said it's simple to get the data if you're a pro, but also that the process itself is very likely to not work. What does that mean?


Edited by TheJBizz, 06 January 2014 - 11:31 AM.


#11 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,714 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 06 January 2014 - 12:21 PM

If you do have valuable data:

 

Please consider replacing your HDD if it is over 4 years old. HDD are mechanical devices: factors such as time, heat, friction, etc, cause the internal parts of a hard drive to wear down over time. A failure is not going to be expected. A failure is inevitable. Your best protection is 1) backups, and 2) replacing your storage mediums regularly (Including backup mediums - HDD, USB Drive, "External Drives", etc). 3-4 years is a good expected lifetime for these devices. 

 

The internals of your HDD can be likened to an old-fashioned record player, but encased in a metal box that you don't open.

 

And be extremely careful when handling your hard drive. It is extremely sensitive to shock, among many other things.

 

A hdd can run for years without a problem, my 200GB Maxtor is seven years old and still hasn't exhibited any signs of wear.  By the same token, your hdd could die after only a short time of use, infant mortality.  The point which should be stressed is that your important data should be backed up to external media, like a second hdd, CDs or DVDs, flash drives, etc.  You can even store files online.  You should make it a habit of backing up your data anytime changes or additions are made.  There are programs which will clone the operating system and data which you can update as well.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 Problem_Solver

Problem_Solver

  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:06:11 AM

Posted 06 January 2014 - 12:31 PM

iSorry for the confusion. Extracting your data from your hard drive is simple. Your data can be moved to another hard drive, usb drive, DVD, etc with a high rate of success.
 
Saving your files is usually easy and takes very little time to do.
 
What is not likely to work is getting your hard drive to work correctly in another computer without reinstalling Windows.
Backup your data. Your hard drive might die next week. It could last you 10 more years. Point is: You won't know when it's going to die - Be prepared!


Edited by hamluis, 06 January 2014 - 03:53 PM.
Merged posts - Hamluis.


#13 TheJBizz

TheJBizz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:11 AM

Posted 09 January 2014 - 07:13 PM

Your advice has been noted. I don't really have the money now for a cloud storage solution, but I can look into acquiring physical HDDs for backup.

 

I formatted my SSD boot drive and reinstalled W7 on it and everything is now neat-o super keen again. Thank you everyone.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users