Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

wireless router and internet history


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 whobdah

whobdah

  • Members
  • 87 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwalk, Ohio
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 02:08 PM

Most people want to hide what they are seeing on the web, I'm on the other end.  I'm the Dad.  My wife has been bothering me about watching the internet history.  We have a wireless network with a Linksys wrt120n router.  The internet is provided by Time Warner Cable. 

 

My daughter is responsible, for now.  She has a kindle fire HD and she is increasingly spending more time on.  She is twelve and I know kids can be tempted. 

 

I've looked over other posts and other sites.  I can't tell the truth from the lies.  I don't want to pay for software unless I know it works. 

 

I want a way to look at all the websites that anyone using the wireless router.  Is that possible? If so, please point me in the right direction. 

 

Thanks for the help, Bleeping Computer has never steered me wrong. 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 dls62

dls62

  • Members
  • 623 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berkshire, UK
  • Local time:09:54 PM

Posted 05 January 2014 - 05:22 PM

Hi,

 

Its not free, but you might want to look at this - http://www.linklogger.com/


Edited by dls62, 05 January 2014 - 05:22 PM.


#3 Greg62702

Greg62702

  • Banned
  • 717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:54 PM

Posted 06 January 2014 - 08:05 PM

If you want to know what she is doing, ask her for the Kindle.  You are the parent, you are able to use parental controls with the Kindle.  Learn how to use and control the device, not the person using the device.



#4 whobdah

whobdah
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 87 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwalk, Ohio
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 06 January 2014 - 09:17 PM

Whoa!  Before you tell me how to raise my kids, you should know that I would like to look at all internet traffic going through my house.  I could ask for every device, spend hours looking over histories of the devices we own...because I control and monitor all the devices in my home..... but it would much easier for me to look over the internet from one place. 



#5 Greg62702

Greg62702

  • Banned
  • 717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:54 PM

Posted 07 January 2014 - 10:02 AM

Whoa!  Before you tell me how to raise my kids, you should know that I would like to look at all internet traffic going through my house.  I could ask for every device, spend hours looking over histories of the devices we own...because I control and monitor all the devices in my home..... but it would much easier for me to look over the internet from one place. 

With your router, you will not be able to tell where she or anyone else went on the Internet.  Again, the only way to tell is to ask for the device and look through it, or place restrictions for those sites that you do not want her to go to.  Be the parent, do not let the Router or device be the parent.

 

As already mentioned, you can download the logs and go through them every day if you want, with Link Logger.  Personally it is easier to just ask for the device, then sit there for hours, to look through the logs, due to you will get False positives for some sites that she will go to.

 

You may think that she is at Facebook.com, but she never did.  Due to some sites may link with Facebook for user comments.  So again, there really is no positive way to see where she is going, unless you physically ask for the device, and learn to use the parental controls on the device.

 

Kindle FreeTime you can set limits for what she can do, how long she can use the device.  http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201014620

 

You can set daily time limits for your child to read, watch, or play educational content, and set educational goals (like reading 30 minutes every day) in Kindle FreeTime. Parents of younger children who can’t read yet can set goals to use educational apps (such as those that help teach counting, learning letters, and matching shapes) for a certain amount of time each day.

  1.  From the Parent Settings screen, tap Daily Goals & Time Limits.
  2.  Enter your Parental Controls password, and then tap OK.
  3.  Select the profile you want to update, and then tap On.
    • Weekdays / Weekends - Choose different educational goals and time limits for the weekend or weekday.
    • Bedtime - Set a time limit for when your child can use Kindle FreeTime during the day. TapTurn off by to set the time when Kindle FreeTime is turned off. Tap Stay off until to set the time when Kindle FreeTime can be used again.
    • Education Goals - Set goals for viewing educational books, apps, movies, and TV shows. Use the dropdown menus to select the amount of time you want your child to view the content. If you’d like to filter non-educational content from being used until your child’s goals are met, tap the Learn First checkbox.
  4.  Use the slider to adjust total screen time for either of the following:
    • Total Screen Time - Limit the total time your child can spend in Kindle FreeTime.
    • Content Activity Time - Specify individual time limits for reading books, watching movies or TV shows, or using apps or games. For unlimited time, slide the bar all the way to the right. To block access to a content type, slide the bar all the way to the left.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201422490

 

So you do not want her on it after a certain time, again use the features of the device.  When you do, sit down with her, you and mom and have a family meeting, regarding proper Internet use, what your wants from the kid are in how she is using the device, where she is going, and that at any time, mom & dad can take the device away.

 

Worked for me, for my two kids when they would come over to visit on weekends.  They had to use the computer that was in the living room.  When we got a iPod touch, they had to sit in the Living Room with it.  Only when they got older, then we placed a computer in the bedroom that they shared when they were younger, now it is my son's bedroom.

 

My current spouse, their Step-mom & I laid down some ground rules, regarding the use of the desktop in the bedroom.  They knew that at any time, we could walk in and tell them to get up, so we could look at what they were doing.  This was before Teamviewer.  Once I started to use Teamviewer, then my son knew that I could just look in from the Living Room, to see what he was doing.

 

We have enough trust between us all, that at this point, we know my son may visit some site we may not like, but he also knows that he can sit down and talk to us about something.  That is because we laid down the ground rules, and created a zone of trust.


Edited by Greg62702, 07 January 2014 - 10:18 AM.


#6 whobdah

whobdah
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 87 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwalk, Ohio
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 07 January 2014 - 10:23 AM

Greg62702, you have great advice, yet you can't help but put your insult in.  Why?  You know nothing of me or what I do with my kids?  You have no idea what I have in place or the relationship that I have with my children.  You're advice would have gladly been accepted if you had stopped your advice with "you do not want her to go to".  Your last sentence makes me think you're some sort of jack-hole, when you are probably a really nice and smart person.    Anyway I appreciate your input and your advice about my router.  I will ask for the device. 



#7 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 07 January 2014 - 01:59 PM

Check this out and see if it will help you.

 

http://www.netnanny.com/mobile/install/kindlefire/

 

It says the HD isn't supported, but it still may be worth a shot to see if it still works.

 

As far as monitoring other traffic goes you can try:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=4865

http://www.softperfect.com/products/networx/

http://www.gfi.com/blog/the-top-20-free-network-monitoring-and-analysis-tools-for-sys-admins/

http://www.wireshark.org/

http://www.opendns.com/home-solutions/parental-controls/


Edited by chrisd87, 08 January 2014 - 11:19 AM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#8 Greg62702

Greg62702

  • Banned
  • 717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:54 PM

Posted 07 January 2014 - 04:51 PM

Greg62702, you have great advice, yet you can't help but put your insult in.  Why?  You know nothing of me or what I do with my kids?  You have no idea what I have in place or the relationship that I have with my children.  You're advice would have gladly been accepted if you had stopped your advice with "you do not want her to go to".  Your last sentence makes me think you're some sort of jack-hole, when you are probably a really nice and smart person.    Anyway I appreciate your input and your advice about my router.  I will ask for the device. 

I really do not know where you are coming off as insulting.  Again, you are the parent, not the kid or device.  Be the parent, and ask them for the device, when you feel that they are going to sites that you do not want them to be at.  Along with sitting down with everyone at the Kitchen table and discussing about the dangers of the Internet, so that the kid understands.

 

You are not the first parent, that wants to substitute parenting with software.  Now if you keep thinking this is being insulting, it is not.  I can tell you first hand, that you do not have enough hours in the day, to go through the log, or even know what the kid has been looking at, due to again as I mentioned before, that you can get false positives pop up in the log.

 

When you visit sites, you can end up with multiple IP redirects, that will show up in the log for that device.  So again, there is no way of knowing if the kid actually went to the site or not, without physically having the device in your hand, and looking through the web history.



#9 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,335 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 10:13 AM

Another option would be to change the router's DNS to use OpenDNS.

 

The reality is you don't have the time in your life to go every place that is accessed by machines connected to your network.  This ends up being a trust issue, whether or not you like that answer.

 

Just to throw a monkey wrench in your plan what happens when she connects to someone else's network, you no longer have any ability to view where she goes or if she can access a site.  Again it is a trust issue.  One would suppose that you trust her sufficiently to have given her the Kindle in the first place.  Now you need to trust that she will use it in the way that it was intended.



#10 whobdah

whobdah
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 87 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwalk, Ohio
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 11:06 AM

Another option would be to change the router's DNS to use OpenDNS.

 

The reality is you don't have the time in your life to go every place that is accessed by machines connected to your network.  This ends up being a trust issue, whether or not you like that answer.

 

Just to throw a monkey wrench in your plan what happens when she connects to someone else's network, you no longer have any ability to view where she goes or if she can access a site.  Again it is a trust issue.  One would suppose that you trust her sufficiently to have given her the Kindle in the first place.  Now you need to trust that she will use it in the way that it was intended.

Finally!  Somebody who gets it!  My daughter is trustworthy.  She has been given responsibility and she proven she has used the technology as she was expected to.    Thank you for your response.  I will look into opendns



#11 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 11:18 AM

Just to add to what RK posted:

http://www.opendns.com/home-solutions/parental-controls/

 

If you have a dynamic IP, make sure you download their free ip updater which will update your ip if it changes, so that opendns shows the corrects stats and applies the correct settings to the correct address.


Edited by chrisd87, 08 January 2014 - 11:20 AM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#12 Greg62702

Greg62702

  • Banned
  • 717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:24 PM

 

Another option would be to change the router's DNS to use OpenDNS.

 

The reality is you don't have the time in your life to go every place that is accessed by machines connected to your network.  This ends up being a trust issue, whether or not you like that answer.

 

Just to throw a monkey wrench in your plan what happens when she connects to someone else's network, you no longer have any ability to view where she goes or if she can access a site.  Again it is a trust issue.  One would suppose that you trust her sufficiently to have given her the Kindle in the first place.  Now you need to trust that she will use it in the way that it was intended.

Finally!  Somebody who gets it!  My daughter is trustworthy.  She has been given responsibility and she proven she has used the technology as she was expected to.    Thank you for your response.  I will look into opendns

 

We all get it.  You just did not like the other answers.  The OP stated the same thing I did, but you refused to listen or read through what I stated.



#13 Greg62702

Greg62702

  • Banned
  • 717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:28 PM

Just to add to what RK posted:

http://www.opendns.com/home-solutions/parental-controls/

 

If you have a dynamic IP, make sure you download their free ip updater which will update your ip if it changes, so that opendns shows the corrects stats and applies the correct settings to the correct address.

The problem is, the kid can get around the home router, if they find a open Wifi connection nearby, or figure out how to set a DNS on the Kindle.  The OP has to have a router that will allow them to use OpenDNS on the router, not just set the Kindle or computers with the OpenDNS IP.  But also as I already mentioned, they need to sit down and discuss this with everyone, not just go and do it.  They will find very quickly that going behind everyone's back in the house, without telling them that you are locking down the network, will cause distrust between everyone and the person setting the router with OpenDNS as the redirect, for securing the network.

 

When you lock down the network with OpenDNS, it locks it down for everyone in the house, not just one machine.  That means that if you give the wife the password to bypass, the wife will end up giving it to the kids, or the kids will just press the reset button on the back of the router, to get around it.



#14 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:03:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:42 PM

Most routers allow you to set custom dns servers, if not they can always flash dd-wrt and do it that way. Yes, we all know that it comes down to trust, but implementing openDNS into the equation allows the network to be more secure from viruses and everything to that nature. IT'S not all about trust, but about securing the network from outside intrusions that could of been prevented if proper security measures were in place...

 

We know that it locks down the network for everyone BUT only on preset lists that you configure within the account settings! You don't won't any websites to be blocked, then fine set the setting to not block any websites based on the list... Implementing opendns does not cause distrust in the household unless it's configured to do so which would still be more of a security measure than a distrust...

 

And as far as the reset goes, some routers will become unusable until they are  reconfigured if the reset button is pressed. The kid presses the reset button on the back of the router which won't do anything unless it's actually held down. Also the router should be setup somewhere high enough to provide adequate signal coverage throughout the entire home which an average 12 year old would not be able to reach.


Edited by chrisd87, 08 January 2014 - 07:10 PM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#15 Greg62702

Greg62702

  • Banned
  • 717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:54 PM

Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:16 PM

And as far as the reset goes, some routers will become unusable until they are  reconfigured if the reset button is pressed. The kid presses the reset button on the back of the router which won't do anything unless it's actually held down. Also the router should be setup somewhere high enough to provide adequate signal coverage throughout the entire home which an average 12 year old would not be able to reach.

12 year old kids are not exactly short.  Also most 12 year old', know more about computers and the Internet, then their parents do.  At least in most households out there.  As for the router reset, kids know how, or will figure out how to reset the unit.  Once it is reset if you have Cable Internet, it will work with no administrative changes on the unit.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users