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No ip address solving by bypassing home router


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#1 greenslam

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:27 PM

Hi all,

 

I am trying to understand how this works. 

 

To give some background, I am Level 1 tech for a major Western Canada ISP cable provider.  I am trying to figure out why people lose an ip address from day to day. Or why bypassing the wifi router, thus  getting a valid ip address, then hooking up the router back into the mix will allow the router to pass an ip address.

 

So my tools will be able to show me the modem's RF levels and if it is passing an ip address 24.xx.xx.xx

 

So in my scenario,  person A has a Motorola  Surfboard 5102 docsis 2 series modem to D-link DIR-615 router to a win 7 machine, tablet and cell phone. (Basically insert commonly used residential hardware. )

 

So customer goes to sleep with working internet, they wake up in the morning, and the internet is down.   Why would this happen?

 

I can see on my end that the SB5102 RF levels are good and the modem is no longer passing an IP address.  It does not look like the modem went offline per the timers available in my tool.

 

I go through standard troubleshooting.  Power cycle modem and router, wait a bit and there is no ip address.  I typically then bypass the wifi modem and go direct from SB5102 to pc. (No ipconfig release/renew or restart of the pc).  Boom the win 7 machine identifies a network and I see a valid IP address.  They can browse now.

 

So we work the router back into the mix with an obligatory power cycle of the SB5102 prior to adjusting the Ethernet cables.  Now an ip address is being passed by the router to the SB5102 and thus onto the ISP.

 

Why does this switching of the communication path and back again then allow the router to become effective in network communication?

Would there be some sort of cloning of the MAC address or IP conflict that had occurred?

 

 



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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 11:01 PM

Did you try an ipconfig /release and renew with the router hooked up? if yes what IP address did they get?

When you switch the router back in, did it have power or no?

was the PC rebooted at any time?


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#3 greenslam

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:30 AM

I'll modify my standard troubleshooting approach to include to include a ipconfig renew/release prior to bypassing the wifi modem. I fully expect them to get some sort of 192.168.x.x ip address while connected to the router. 

 

I always ask them to power cycle the cable modem and the router whenever doing any type of ethernet position swaps.  (Whether they actually listen to me on power cycling the router is questionable. Isn't the first rule of tech support is that customer lie?)   

 

I get this scenario (with varying types of equipment) on a daily/hourly basis.



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 12:43 PM

How many IP addresses do you provision?  Comcast in the US only gives one and the issues I see are user gets a new machine and/or router and can't pull an IP until they power cycle the modem.  Wide Open West on the other hand gives three IP addresses and until they use all three addresses there are no issues.

 

Are you seeing this with a specific brand or model router?  I have seen issues with D-Link routers doing odd things, dropping VPN connection every 60 seconds or so.  The problem may be the router, something you're not responsible for supporting.



#5 greenslam

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 03:20 PM

Typically we only provide one ip address. We do have the option of providing 2 ip addresses.  This is assuming residential customers not business ones. ( Im a res tech but I would expect we would serve multiple ip address to SOHO and bigger customers. )

 

I'm going to have to start a tracker to see if I can see any type of trends with it.  Specific brand and so on. 

 

The router isn't something I am responsible, but I would like give a more better explanation than they stopped talkling properly.  It just seems odd that switching to a direct IP address, and then back to a 192.168 ip address works to restore internet connectivity. 



#6 Greg62702

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 08:18 PM

Improper setup by the customer for the router.  Out of the box if the customer connected the WAN port of the router to the LAN port on the modem, then went through and started up modem by plugging in, then plugged in the router, then turned on their computer, after connecting it via Ethernet cord to the D-Link, it should work as is.

 

Now if they loaded the D-Link software, or your ISP software, they need to uninstall both of those.  If they are using their Cellphone for a Wireless hotspot, the computer could be trying to find that hotspot, after the customer has turned it off on their phone.

 

Now of course, if the customer connected the modem to the LAN port on the router, even if they left DHCP on on the router, it can screw things up.

 

Router manufacturers have made it easy, by color coding the cords, and giving the customers a nice poster, that shows what cord plugs in where.

 

I am siding with human error on this one, not a router or ISP issue.



#7 jhayz

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:48 PM

I presume that everything is setup properly since it works other than the intermittent problem at hand. The only thing that would verify if its the Dlink is faulty is a direct connection to the modem overnight. There might be a connection time for IP addresses on the Dlink router also.


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#8 Greg62702

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:55 PM

There are five different hardware revisions for this model (A, B, C, E, I).  Need the hardware revision.  You can have the customer go to http://support.dlink.com/ProductInfo.aspx?m=DIR-615 pull the latest firmware, see if that solves the problem



#9 greenslam

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 10:39 AM

I presume that everything is setup properly since it works other than the intermittent problem at hand. The only thing that would verify if its the Dlink is faulty is a direct connection to the modem overnight. There might be a connection time for IP addresses on the Dlink router also.

 

Now that sounds like an interesting possibility.  It never occurred to me.  It should let go and then auto reconnect but sometimes that just doesn't happen. 






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