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i7 3.2ghz 960 Corsair cooled CPU suddenly overheating causing shutdown


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#1 Depth3D

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 07:18 AM

Yay, hi guys n gals, 

 

i7 3.2gHz 960 (Corsair water cooler), 24gb 1600mhz RAM, Sabertooth X58 motherboard, 2x128gb SSD primary drive, 2x1tb HDD secondary on Raid, NVIDIA GeForce FX5600 1.5gb graphics.

 

I work in 3D modelling and animation. I had my system custom built to cope with the high end files I create. My usually stable system has suddenly begun to overheat on the CPU (100 degrees on SIW) causing the system to shut down without notice. I have reseated the memory modules, cleaned all the PC's fans and filters, paying specific attention to the Corsair watercooling system, ensuring their is sufficient cooling paste to seat the thing to the CPU, checked all the disk connections and made sure the Corsairs water pump is working.

 

Is there any way in which I can test the CPU to positively verify that it is overheating? I have SIW installed which lets me check pretty much anything relative to system operations. Any help you guys n gals can give would be hugely appreciated.

 

A very happy New Year to you all.

 

Kindest regards

depth3d 


Edited by hamluis, 30 December 2013 - 08:58 AM.
Moved from XP to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 synergy513

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 01:39 PM

can you provide your power supply specs? more than likely, it is the root of the adversity.

 

sometimes SIW misses a few beats on temperatures, but not often as it gets the info from bios anyway. if your system is spontaneously shutting down, that is an indication of the cpu overheating, and that particular CPU is notorious for northbridge heat.

 

 if it was your gfx card overheating, then your display would  turn off, but your system would still be humming along.

 

 my stock air-cooled i-7 950 doesn't  get omenously hot during animation routines, but my gtx 285 sure does.


Moore's Law : 4d Graph in Progress


#3 Depth3D

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 04:42 AM

Hi Synergy513

 

Thanks for your reply.

 

The psu is a Corsair CMPSU-750HX.

 

After one of the crashes, I did note that an error message came up on the boot sequence regarding CPU overheating, my having to press F1 to continue with the boot. The PC was running slowly beforehand when using 3D Studio Max with a medium size file before it crashed (well, more like just powered down without preamble). If the CPU is on the fritz, then I shall claim on my insurance to replace it. If this model of processor is prone to this kind of fault, would you happen to know the range of processors my Sabertooth X58 motherboard can cope with? My only requirement, really, is that I have a bunch of cores to cope with rendering. 

 

Kind regards

depth3d



#4 synergy513

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:52 PM

the sabertooth x58 is 1366 socket, which is limited with cpus it can support. it is mostly the older generations of the I-7 (9 X 0 (x) with the maximum being the 990x. a 4 core hyperthreaded cpu should be spreading the load, but it looks like your application is taxing the bleep out of one core leaving the others idling.  have you noticed in your task manager the cpu load being unevenly distributed amongst the cores while jamming with your app?? one little tidbit i recall, is the higher the nm, the higher the heat. same with Hertz. the higher, the hotter. the i-7 9_0 series i think is 45nm, the latest 4th gen intel 4xxx haswell processors are considerably lower in the range of 22nm and those are socket 1150.

 

your power supply is sporting 62 amps on the 12v, so that should be an orderly component.

 

i will look up the optimum cooling apparatus for that cpu series. some are junk, others need improvising, others may very well be  the cure-all solution.

 

i see the corsair h100 as the standard, but there are custom cooling rigs (noctua nh-d14) that are more efficient, but at what cost? i remember seeing one with the moniker "V8" a few months ago

 

         i hate to beat a dead horse, but is your current cooling apparatus functioning at full potential?  the pump(s) and the lines being 100% flowing without leaks or heatpipe saturation?


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#5 jonuk76

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 04:08 PM

Are you sure you've got a Geforce FX5600?  That's a 10 year old card that would be outperformed by any low end integrated graphics these days.  Perhaps you mean a GTX560?

 

Anyway, CoreTemp reads the temperatures directly from the CPU's own internal thermal sensors rather than BIOS.  I suspect it will give the same information as what the current software you're using gives, but it might be worth the second opinion.

 

With thermal paste it's best to apply as little as possible.  It's absolutely not a good idea to slather the stuff onto the CPU.  It's just there to fill the microscopic gaps between the heatsink and the CPU due to surface imperfections.  It's not as good as metal at conducting heat, but it's a damn site better than air.  The best thermal transfer in theory would be a perfectly flat heatsink and perfectly flat CPU and no paste.  But that is impossible in real life, so we need to use paste.

 

Lastly it's uncommon but those Corsair liquid coolers can leak, and if they lose the coolant, there's nothing to transfer heat away from the cpu.  Signs of this should be obvious though.


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#6 Depth3D

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:45 PM

I am reduced to using my spare Asus 2x1.8GHz Quad core computer. I remember looking at the Sensor section of SIW during the overheating fault of the i7 960. All four cores were overheating evenly. Looking at this fact, I am going to assume the Corsair watercooler has failed, somehow. The only way to prove this, of course, is to replace the cooling system and see.

 

I just wanted to say a big thank you to you guys for all your kind help.  

 

I will let you know how I get on.

 

Cheers






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