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#1 4dude

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 10:37 PM

Im listing 2 programs that will provide you with your Windows Key..

1) Jellybean key finder -- This lets you change your key also.. (But I would be careful doing so)

2) Diag.exe - This simply lists out all kinds of info about your computer!

Both links are ZIP downloads for your conveinence :)


EDIT:

Im trying to upload these files also but they wont both upload for some reason....... I GUESS THE LINKS ARE FINE...

Attached Files


Edited by 4dude, 29 December 2013 - 10:42 PM.


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#2 goldfist

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 08:04 PM

Had used Windows Key Finder in past to verify which keys were used to activate which workstations to avoid duplicate systems with same keys at a business with like 400 workstations and the prior employee was lazy at key management and so it was found that although we had 400 xp licenses, there were duplicate systems with same keys to have to perform RIS on them all over again and use their keys as on the affixed key label etc instead of whatever key was used multiple times by a lazy system builder prior to me, and this tool came up as a false positive for malware with Norton later on a few months later.

 

 Does Jellybean run without false positives?



#3 Platypus

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 09:24 PM

Whether tools like Jellybean provoke a response is really up to the scanner involved, so different AVs or Security Suites will give different results. It's not necessarily appropriate to classify these responses as a false positive, because even though the tool itself might be a normal part of system maintenance, there can be circumstances where its use could be malicious. A corporate focused monitor like Norton is probably more likely to flag it, as in a corporate environment the presence of something like that could indicate malicious intent by someone, in comparison with having it exist on a home computer.


Edited by Platypus, 03 January 2014 - 09:26 PM.

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#4 4dude

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 04:02 AM

Does Jellybean run without false positives?

They both run fine for me :)

I dunno why anyone would want to change a windows Key,if they have a valid key,WHY MESS WITH IT?? (Thats why i suggested using caution)

#5 goldfist

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 04:02 PM

I dunno why anyone would want to change a windows Key,if they have a valid key,WHY MESS WITH IT?? (Thats why i suggested using caution)
 

 

Well it was brought to my attention after a update back in 2006 started having multiple workstations complaining about the WGA http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9002095/Update_Windows_Genuine_Advantage_What_it_is_how_to_ditch_it. It stated to the effect that the license key had been used one too many times and this installation "could be" a pirated copy of the OS and then it wanted you to buy a new licensed copy to activate and make the message go away. The fix was pretty simple, swap the workstations that were found with duplicate/incorrect keys out and connect them to the RIS Server I had back at my office to push a clean image with proper key activation according to the key that was on the computer itself of the HP SFF Pentium 4 computers. So with RIS it was a very fast rebuild process with a dedicated 100mbps connection between RIS and the workstation taking the RIS image. After going through this process the WGA alerts went away because each system had its own key.

 

If you dont have the WGA blat or any other issues, then legally there is nothing wrong I suppose with 2 computers running on the same XP key as long as both of them were purchased with the same version of XP, but I wanted to fix this sloppy mistake that a previous employee made before I got there to keep everything running with limited phone calls from users about pop up messages etc.






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