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Is this network overworked??


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7 replies to this topic

#1 David Ashcroft

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 05:37 PM

Hi all, i just wanted to explain a network and was wondering if you think it is possibly overworked...

 

There are 4 main switches, each 8 ports and all gigabit switches....

 

The network has approx the following:

 

10 IP cameras

2 Servers one for cameras one for file sharing and printer management

2 card machines

5/6 computers

5/6 phones connected to wifi for simple web browsing

 

I have heard people say that IP cameras are very bandwidth intensive and i was just wondering if you think i am putting too much on the network.

 

The switches, and computers and servers all have gigabit NIC's.

 

I have attached a picture of the CCTV server which runs the cameras 24/7. the NIC shows about 2.5% usage of the Gigabit card...So surely if that server can handle a constant packets from 10 cameras whilst only having around 2.5% network utilization everything should be OK? Is this correct or am i looking at it all wrong?

 

See attached image.

 

was_server.jpg

 

Thanks!!


Edited by David Ashcroft, 20 December 2013 - 05:39 PM.


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#2 Greg62702

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 09:49 PM

You are barely even touching what it can do. It is not the infrastructure, such as the wiring that matters. What matters is the router and modem, if they can handle the traffic. Especially the router.

#3 David Ashcroft

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 11:43 AM

The router is simply used to connect to the internet. The router comes into the building and is connected to one of the switches via Ethernet, the entire internal network is ran via the switches.

 

The switches are Netgear Gigabit. 

 

Link: http://www.businessdirect.bt.com/products/netgear-8-port-10-100-1000-mbps-switch-2G5W.html?q=netgear%20switch

 

Thanks! 



#4 CaveDweller2

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 12:23 AM

My advice would be to buy a spare switch for the one connected to the cameras. That is for home or maybe small business use but that amount of data I doubt it will last a year. At that price you'd have to buy a bunch of them to reach the price of a professional grade switch. And who knows by then something newer/faster might be out =)


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#5 Greg62702

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 06:57 PM

The router is simply used to connect to the internet. The router comes into the building and is connected to one of the switches via Ethernet, the entire internal network is ran via the switches.
 
The switches are Netgear Gigabit. 
 
Link: http://www.businessdirect.bt.com/products/netgear-8-port-10-100-1000-mbps-switch-2G5W.html?q=netgear%20switch
 
Thanks!

It does not matter what switch you have. Again, you are barely even touching it,in overworking the Router or even switch. The traffic that you are sending through your network, is not even enough to cause issues as I stated before.

#6 Greg62702

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 06:58 PM

My advice would be to buy a spare switch for the one connected to the cameras. That is for home or maybe small business use but that amount of data I doubt it will last a year. At that price you'd have to buy a bunch of them to reach the price of a professional grade switch. And who knows by then something newer/faster might be out =)

The OP does not need a managed switch, nor even showing a reason to go with anything different than what they already have.

#7 CaveDweller2

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 11:32 PM

and where did I say he did? Only reason I mentioned it is because I mentioned that is a switch for home use. 


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#8 installer

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:47 AM

I Agree. Always try to provide a separate switch for your CCTV Systems.






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