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System Idle makes activity light come on


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#1 Double44

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:20 PM

Hi :D

 

Throughout the lifespan of my computer, whenever I leave the computer for about 10-15 minutes, the activity light on my laptop will come on, almost as if a program is trying to "scan" for something. I want to say it's related to some HP software (or bloat), but I have no idea what is causing it or where to look for it, or even if it can be uninstalled. As soon as I move my mouse, the activity light stops flashing.



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#2 Animal

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:36 PM

Mine does too, every Windows OS back to ME has for me. Just because you're not using the computer doesn't mean there aren't systems applications running in the background.

Are you having a specific problem you need addressed or just curious about the activity indicator?

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#3 Platypus

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 08:07 PM

A common activity during idle time is background defrag and boot file optimization that was introduced from XP onward.


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#4 Double44

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 02:28 PM

Mine does too, every Windows OS back to ME has for me. Just because you're not using the computer doesn't mean there aren't systems applications running in the background.

Are you having a specific problem you need addressed or just curious about the activity indicator?

Just curious about the indicator, I thought it might have been bad software trying to run itself in the background, but Platypus suggests it is Windows related. In that case, I guess it's best to leave it alone  :santa:



#5 Double44

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 07:52 AM

A common activity during idle time is background defrag and boot file optimization that was introduced from XP onward.

Is this what really happens? Should I consider this a beneficial thing, and let it stay idle for awhile?



#6 Platypus

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:14 AM

Yes, it's useful. It reduces the need to do specific defrags, and after every third boot-up, the most frequently accessed files as recorded by the superfetch function will be moved (if necessary) to the optimal position at the start of the drive where the transfer rate is highest and access will be the fastest.


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#7 Double44

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:47 AM

Yes, it's useful. It reduces the need to do specific defrags, and after every third boot-up, the most frequently accessed files as recorded by the superfetch function will be moved (if necessary) to the optimal position at the start of the drive where the transfer rate is highest and access will be the fastest.

Thanks for your input Platypus, exactly what I wanted to know. Why after every third boot-up? I mostly put my system to sleep, does 'waking' from sleep state count as a boot?



#8 Platypus

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:27 AM

Observing the system load over 3 cycles gives a reasonable assessment of typical usage. Mostly using sleep will inhibit the boot optimization, and could also result in your system being less stable over time. Waking from sleep or coming out of hibernation does not count as a boot cycle, since the computer resumes a saved state. As far as Windows operation goes, it's like it has been running continuously since last time there was a full cold boot. It does Windows good to periodically have a proper reboot (which it may do naturally during things like automatic updates and software installations of course).


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#9 djsi

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 01:33 PM

 It does Windows good to periodically have a proper reboot

 

I will second this,as sometimes a reboot alone can fix problems.



#10 Double44

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 07:07 AM

Observing the system load over 3 cycles gives a reasonable assessment of typical usage. Mostly using sleep will inhibit the boot optimization, and could also result in your system being less stable over time. Waking from sleep or coming out of hibernation does not count as a boot cycle, since the computer resumes a saved state. As far as Windows operation goes, it's like it has been running continuously since last time there was a full cold boot. It does Windows good to periodically have a proper reboot (which it may do naturally during things like automatic updates and software installations of course).

thanks for the information :)



#11 Platypus

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 07:09 AM

You're welcome! :)


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