Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Multiple network questions?? I haz many.


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 Double44

Double44

  • Members
  • 58 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States
  • Local time:10:44 PM

Posted 16 December 2013 - 10:20 AM

My internet connection has been acting strange recently, which has brought up some questions I'd like to ask. Can someone help me answer them? I have a few computers on the network/router.

 

1) Recently I had a computer show a 'yellow-exclamation' symbol over the 'wired connection' symbol, then automatically disappeared soon after. I've ran across this quite a few times in the past. I'm wondering if this could be related to something malicious on the system, and/or whether it may affect the connections of others on the network?

 

2) Recently my wireless connections went out, but the wired connections appeared normal. After rebooting the router, one of the computers was given an error message: "Windows-System error--There is an IP address conflict with another system on the network". I put it to sleep because I had a feeling it would be assigned a new IP address when it wakes up. I eventually checked this to make sure, and each had their own address. If it had stayed (for hours or days) on the same IP address as another computer, would that have been a problem or potential risk to either system?

 

3) I notice a wireless device on my network that I don't recognize. It doesn't have any IP address or device name assigned to it, just a MAC address. I have a feeling this is normal (not an intruder), but I do not know what it is. The only device that should be acting as a wireless device is the computer I'm typing this on; my smartphone is using a mobile data network.

 

4) My router gives off two different Wireless Network Connections. One of them has a 2.4Ghz speed, and another has a 5Ghz speed. I have never connected to the 5Ghz one, but is there any benefit to doing so? My laptop sees it, but the connection normally appears weaker in strength than the full 2.4Ghz connection I'm using.

 

5) Let's pretend someone has hacked into a computer, does rebooting the router lose track of them? I'm asking this because I'd like to understand why rebooting is a suggested solution to networking problems.


Edited by Double44, 16 December 2013 - 10:35 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 16 December 2013 - 11:14 AM

If no one comes by to assist you, then I will take this up and answer these questions when I have a bit more time. I am off to take a nap before a job interview.

#3 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,408 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:11:44 PM

Posted 16 December 2013 - 01:33 PM

1.  This is just an issue with your connection, like no Internet access.  Can be caused by many things.  Its main function is to alert you to the issue.  Unless you're having the issue it will be difficult if not impossible to resolve.

 

2.  IP address conflicts are common after a reboot, if all connect equipment has not been rebooted.  DHCP hands out addresses that it believes are free.  When the router is rebooted that list is cleared and any device that has an address that was not also rebooted after the router will maintain that address until the end of its lease.

 

3.  You can use this site to find out who makes the device by searching the MAC address you are seeing.  You can then check your devices to see if it matches any of them.

 

4.  2.4Ghz is your B and G wireless.  5Ghz is your N.  The 5Ghz will be faster, if your adapter is a N adapter, otherwise you can't use it.

 

5.  Rebooting is suggested to clear out everything.  You do it on a router for the same reasons you do it on a computer.  It just clears everything out and a simple reboot will clear many issues.  This isn't going to do much, other than temporarily disconnect, a person who is connected to your machine.



#4 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 16 December 2013 - 01:36 PM

You can look up the first 6 fields of the MAC address on google to determine the device manufacture and go from there.

#5 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:44 PM

Posted 16 December 2013 - 06:21 PM

4.  2.4Ghz is your B and G wireless.  5Ghz is your N.  The 5Ghz will be faster, if your adapter is a N adapter, otherwise you can't use it.


This is not quite correct.

It will really depend on the router.

If it is a 802.11n compatible router, then it will generally use both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands for the 802.11n connections. It will also use the 2.4 GHz band for any devices that connection as a 802.11g or 802.11b device and should use the 5 GHz band for any connection to an 802.11a device (rather rare).

If it is not a 802.11n compatible router, then 2.4 GHz is for 802.11b and 802.11g while 5 GHz is for 802.11a.

Overall, I am guessing that it is an 802.11n router.

Both bands have advantages and disadvantages. This article gives a good summary:

http://compnetworking.about.com/od/wirelessfaqs/f/5ghz-gear.htm

In very short form, 5 GHz tends to have less interference, but 2.4 GHz tends to have better range (which is why the original poster was getting a weaker signal strength from the 5 GHz network).

The biggest reason you may want to use the separate 5 GHz network is if you do actually have older devices that can only connect at 802.11b or 802.11g speeds. 802.11n 2.4GHz networks tend to drop to the lowest denominator speed that connects to it. So, if you have an 802.11g device connecting to your 2.4 GHz 802.11n WiFi network, then that 2.4 GHz 802.11n network will operate at 802.11g speeds for ALL devices, even those that are capable of 802.11n speeds. So, if you have an 802.11g only (or even worse an 802.11b only) device, then you may want to connect all your 802.11n devices to the 5 GHz band to avoid the speed drop due to the older device on the network. This maybe have been what was trying to say.

#6 Double44

Double44
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 58 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States
  • Local time:10:44 PM

Posted 17 December 2013 - 03:21 AM

Thanks for the advice guys. I looked up the MAC address using the first 6 characters at the link RKilroy gave:

 

00A096 Mitumi Electric Co., Ltd. (Mitsumi?)

 

Any idea who this might be? I used Wikipedia to look it up: "Mitsumi Electric Co., Ltd. is a Japanese manufacturer of consumer electronic components, founded in 1954." Doesn't really help, I'm still oblivious as to who this is.

This isn't going to do much, other than temporarily disconnect, a person who is connected to your machine.

Is there anything a person could do remove such person? I'd like to know why an unknown MAC address is tied to my wireless network.

2.4Ghz is your B and G wireless.  5Ghz is your N.  The 5Ghz will be faster, if your adapter is a N adapter, otherwise you can't use it.

Could the 5Ghz be meant for wireless gaming consoles?

 

edit: also, how do I add a person's name to their Quote inside the BC editor?


Edited by Double44, 17 December 2013 - 03:23 AM.


#7 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 17 December 2013 - 06:30 AM

There is no range for wireless gaming consoles. The standard of 802.11x dictates your wireless connection device's frequency range.

Where X = a/b/g/n/ac

#8 Double44

Double44
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 58 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States
  • Local time:10:44 PM

Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:20 PM

bump



#9 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:39 PM

You would do the following:

[quote name="Double44" post="3238003" timestamp="1387502437"]
That will add the following.



#10 jhayz

jhayz

  • BC Advisor
  • 6,922 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:44 PM

Posted 19 December 2013 - 11:52 PM

You can use this http://www.advanced-ip-scanner.com/ to check for current active devices connected to your router also.


Tekken
 


#11 Double44

Double44
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 58 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States
  • Local time:10:44 PM

Posted 01 January 2014 - 06:59 AM

Can someone respond to this?

 

I looked up the MAC address using the first 6 characters at the link RKilroy gave:

 

00A096 Mitumi Electric Co., Ltd. (Mitsumi?)

 

Any idea who this might be? I used Wikipedia to look it up: "Mitsumi Electric Co., Ltd. is a Japanese manufacturer of consumer electronic components, founded in 1954." Doesn't really help, I'm still oblivious as to who this is.

 



#12 CaveDweller2

CaveDweller2

  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:44 AM

Posted 01 January 2014 - 01:37 PM

You aren't asking for the manufacture you are asking what device has that MAC address correct? I don't think there is an easy way for you to find it but if it is bugging you go into your router and set up MAC filtering to deny that MAC address.


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#13 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 01 January 2014 - 06:51 PM

Do you have any bluetooth devices?

#14 Double44

Double44
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 58 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States
  • Local time:10:44 PM

Posted 01 January 2014 - 11:47 PM

You aren't asking for the manufacture you are asking what device has that MAC address correct? I don't think there is an easy way for you to find it but if it is bugging you go into your router and set up MAC filtering to deny that MAC address.

It appears on my router as a wireless device, and just wanted to know who or what it is? It doesn't appear to be an intruder, however I am still concerned. If it were apart of something integral, shouldn't I see it as something else other than a "device" alongside my smartphone, xbox, or computer??

 

Do you have any bluetooth devices?

Not that I'm aware of.


Edited by Double44, 01 January 2014 - 11:47 PM.


#15 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 02 January 2014 - 06:44 AM

Where exactly does that MAC Address appear at in your router?

Can you take a screen shot of the page?

Also what kind of router do you have?




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users