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Desktop crashed and won't reboot


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#1 mousemanb

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:17 PM

Hi folks,

 

I found this forum while researching my problem, so I thought I'd post here. Computer in question is a Dell XPS with Windows 7 Home Premium, 64-bit, with SP1. My OS is installed on a 128GB Crucial M4 SSD. Before I upgraded to the 128GB SSD, my OS was residing on a partition of a 1TB WD Drive, which I still have hooked up to my computer. This will come into play later...

 

I was on the internet when my computer crashed, and upon rebooting, gave me a BSOD. I've been unable to boot that OS ever since. Text is as follows:

--------------------------------------------------------------
A problem has been detected and Windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer.

BAD_POOL_HEADER

If this is the first time you've seen this stop error screen, restart your computer. If this screen appears again, follow these steps:
Check to make sure any new hardware or software is properly installed. If this is a new installation, ask your hardware or software manufacturer for any winows updates you might need.

If problems continue, disable or remove any newly installed hardware or software. Disable BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing. If you need to use Safe Mode to remove or disable components, restart your computer, press F8 to select Advanced startup options, and then select Safe Mode.

Technical information:
***STOP:0x00000019 (0x0000000000000022, 0xFFFFF8A000C00000, 0X0000000000000001, 0X0000000000000000)
-------------------------------------------------------

Next, when the computer tried to restart, I saw this:

--------------------------------------------------------

Windows Boot Manager
Windows failed to start. A recent hardware or software change might be the cause. To fix the problem, "Repair your computer"
Status: 0xc000000e
Info: The boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessible.

--------------------------------------------------------

 

Some forums have indicated that I may need to perform startup repair three times in order to correct all the boot errors. I've done this using a burned ISO of my OS (Win 7 Home Premium 64-bit with SP1), and at the end of it, I'm told the error cannot be fixed, and this is the resulting error message:

Problem event name: startup repair offline
Problem signature 01: 6.1.7600.16385
Problem signature 02: 6.1.7600.16385
Problem signature 03: Unknown
Problem signature 04: 21200492
Problem signature 05: ExternalMedia
Problem signature 06: 5
Problem signature 07: NoBootFailure
OS version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.256.1
Locale ID: 1033

 

However, in the process of doing the startup repair, the installation disc recognized both OSes, and it recovered the OS on the old drive as well. So now when my startup fails and it gives me an option to reboot, I see two options - Windows 7 (my current OS on my SSD, which fails to boot every time I select it) and Windows 7 Home Premium (Recovered), which is my old OS on the hard drive, and which is able to boot up every time I select it. Through my old OS, I'm able to access everything on my SSD, and all the data appears to be intact (whew). So my SSD doesn't seem to be the culprit.

 

So I did some more research, and found this website (https://neosmart.net/wiki/recovering-windows-bootloader/).

Using the command prompt through my installation disk, I tried manually repairing the bootloader using bootrec.exe. That didn't work, so I replaced the existing BCD registry with bcdedit and recreating boot from scratch. After that, my initial startup failed again, but this time I was given the option to boot into various safe modes (these options were not showing up previously). Booting into my old OS, I then tried to do a clean startup through msconfig using a selective startup with all non-Microsoft startup processes disabled. I was still unable to boot, so I switched back to a normal startup, after which I was unable to boot into safe mode at all.
 

Other things I've tried:

 

-Ran the Diagnostic option that popped up when I hit F12 at the beginning splash screen.

Error message popped up:
Error Code 2000-0142
Validation 41375
Msg: Hard Drive 2 - S/N WD-WCATR0151943, self test unsuccessful. Status = 7
The given error code and message can be used by Dell Technical Support to help diagnose the problem. Do you want to continue testing?

Under the "Results" tab, everything passed except the error above. Hard Drive 2 - DST Short Test. This is my 1TB drive with the old OS on it.

Booting using my old OS, I ran Western Digital Data Lifeguard Diagnostics - DLGDIAG for Windows. Extended test pass on Drive 0 (Crucial M4)
Ran the Windows Memory Diagnostics Tool. For some reason it took two restarts for the test to actually run. No errors were detected.
Ran the Seagate Seatools, based on another forum, and the SSDchecked out ok.
Ran CHKDSK on the SSD, and there were no bad sectors.
Ran SFC to check system files and found no integrity violations

 

 

And now I'm at a loss. My lack of knowledge is preventing me from delving any deeper and really getting to the root of what's going on, which is why my approach has been somewhat haphazard.

 

Is there anyone out there who's read all the way to the end and is able to point me in the right direction?? I've spent the better part of two days on this, and I'm about ready to just go buy another drive and start with a fresh install of Windows...


Edited by mousemanb, 08 December 2013 - 10:50 AM.


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#2 acerts04

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 07:01 PM

Hmm based on the diagnostic test on the western digital that drive is failing. You can try to run a chkdsk /r on it for bad sectors, but i doubt it helps. I would just get rid of it from the system all together. Set the ssd as your only drive and try to boot into safe mode see if you can get in. Ive hears bad pool header could be memory, but you said your memtest checked out. If nothing works for you, reinstall windows on the ssd and take it from there.

"In real life, the hardest aspect of the battle between good and evil is determining which is which."


#3 mousemanb

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 07:45 PM

Hmm based on the diagnostic test on the western digital that drive is failing. You can try to run a chkdsk /r on it for bad sectors, but i doubt it helps. I would just get rid of it from the system all together. Set the ssd as your only drive and try to boot into safe mode see if you can get in. Ive hears bad pool header could be memory, but you said your memtest checked out. If nothing works for you, reinstall windows on the ssd and take it from there.

Thanks for the input. Would a failing data drive be the culprit for my inability to boot up through the SSD?



#4 hamluis

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:35 PM

Could be.

 

When Windows attempts to start...it first tries to recognize all known useful components.  If you have the failing/dead drive attached and Windows cannot make sense of it, you could have problems booting.

 

Error Code 2000-0142

 

Don't want to give you false hope but I must mention that bad connections/cables can have the same effect as a failing/dead drive.  I'd replace the cables, just to eliminate any possibility of error.

 

Louis






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