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PC auto-boots for a few seconds


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#1 Bellzemos

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:01 PM

Hi!

 

I got a nice and pretty much unused desktop Lenovo ThinkCentre, made in 2007 (I think). The only thing is, when I connect the power plug into the PC it boots up for a few seconds (fans spinning etc.) then stops (turns off). Then, if I boot it up (turn it on) it starts and works normally. I checked all the BIOS (wake on... etc.) settings, even replaced the power supply - but the problem persists: whenever I plug in the power chord the PC starts for a few seconds by itself.

 

Any ideas, anyone?

 

Thank you!



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 06:50 PM

I don't think you have anything to worry about here. I would be inclined to think that this behaviour is triggered by the voltage pulse from the mains power unit when switching on / connecting, except in very well damped circuits you always get a pulse. I agree, it shouldn't happen, but you say the computer works perfectly well when you turn it on. As to a faulty component, I would suspect a capacitor in the power circuits.

 

The only thing I would suggest is that you should be a bit more rigourous than usual doing data back-ups - just in case !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 Bellzemos

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:35 AM

Thank you for your calming post. :) But still, I'd like to find out what's causing this and fix it. I don't think it's too healthy for the PC and it's quite irritating.



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 06:50 PM

I can understand your desire to find what is causing this, but it is almost certainly a hardware problem, and by that I mean an electronic component on the motherboard. A laptop I am currently in the throes of trying to dismantle has a nice 25V 680uF electrolytic in just the right place to cause this sort of difficulty - not that that is the reason I am trying to dismantle it. The problem is to replace a component like this you need to completely remove the mobo from the laptop, so you can get at both sides of it.

 

Apart from the fact that laptops are not the easiest thngs in the world to take to pieces, they are stuffed full of fragile connectors and cables. You run a real risk of doing serious damage to your laptop while trying to solve a minor problem, which as you say, is only an irritant.

 

My advice is to live with it. After all, fans are meant to spin and computers are meant to be booted. I doubt it is doing any harm to your computer.

 

Chris Cosgrove






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