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Microsoft Word error and disappearing files


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#1 stephy1977

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 06:32 AM

Hi there,

 

I'm wondering if anyone can help me or shed some light on a repeated Microsoft Word error that I have received, following which I have lost some documents.  I have had some documents in my 'My Documents' folder for years (things like a journal that are ongoing, which I have worked on daily or weekly for years and have just saved as I have gone along).  A few weeks ago I was working on one of these and when I went to save I received a message that said "Word cannot complete the save due to a file permission error', and then 'Word failed reading from this file.  Please restore the network connection or replace the floppy disk and retry", then "Word has lost data due to a bad network connection or missing floppy' (please note I was not using a floppy disk).  Then my file completely disappeared.  I could not find it anywhere.  Luckily I had most of this backed up on a USB stick, but I was still really concerned.  Today this has happened again with another document.  I'm really worried - does anyone have any initial thoughts on what could be going on?  Please just ask if you have any questions or need additional information.

 

Thanks very much in advance!



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#2 jshanks24

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 02:11 PM

It sounds like your hard drive could be going bad. Have you tried running chkdsk?



#3 stephy1977

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 02:18 PM

I haven't tried that - would that be a good idea?

 

Can I ask what would make a hard drive go bad?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 06:02 PM

To take your questions in reverse order.

 

Hard drives go bad because of old age and wear and tear - this causes sectors here and there on the drive to fail. They can also fail catastrophically due to electronic or mechanical failure. It is not for nothing that hard drives are often referred to as 'spinning rust' !  The fact that they can - and from time to time do - fail is why you should always have your important work backed up, and you can use a wide range of methods for this, depending on the amount of data you have or consider important. You can use, among other things, DVDs, USB memory sticks, additional hard drives, external hard drives.

 

Chkdsk.  This is a means of checking your hard drive(s) for faulty sectors and hopefully repairing them. To use it, click on 'Start / Programs / Accessories', if you don't see 'Command prompt' here, look in 'System tools' which is a sub-folder of 'Accessories'. Then RIGHT click on 'Command prompt' and, from the drop-down box that appears, click on 'Run as administrator'.

 

When you have done this, a black box with white text will appear on your screen. This is the command prompt, and the last line of text will probaly read :

 

C:\Windows\Sytem 32   - with a blinking underline immediately after it.

 

Then all you have to do is type 'chkdsk /r' - note that there is a space between 'chkdsk' and '/r' - and press enter. You will then get a message saying it can't run it because the volume is in use, do you wish to run chkdsk at the next boot. This will be followed by 'Y/N'. Type 'Y' ( = Yes) and press 'Enter', then restart your computer.

 

As your computer restarts, you will see the BIOS screen, then, instead of going to Windows, you will get a black screen with white text telling you that Chkdsk is running. Do not interrupt it, and don't turn off your computer before it has finished. Depending on your processor and the size of your hard drive this process can take upwards of an hour. When it has finished, it will tell you the size of your hard drive, the amount of used and free space, and any faulty sectors.

 

If it comes up with any faulty sectors (1) as a matter of urgency, back up your data, and (2) come back here for advice on what to do next.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 stephy1977

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 07:59 PM

Thanks very much for your detailed response and instructions- I feel better already!  But I have a problem - when I go to Command Prompt and right click, there is no 'run as administrator' - there is a 'run as' option, which when i click opens up a window that has two options; either 'current user' or 'the following user'.  when I select 'the following user' I am asked to select the 'user name' from a dropdown, but the only option in the dropdown is my name (no administrator option).  Do you know how I can run as administrator in any other way?  THank you again and in advance for any guidance/advise you can provide!

 

Take care,

S



#6 jshanks24

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 07:57 PM

Sorry for the late reply.

 

It has been a while since I have used XP but I was thinking you should be able to run the chkdsk /r command without selecting run as administrator. I didnt think that came along until vista. Try running the command by just opening the command prompt as normal and see what happens.



#7 hamluis

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 09:40 AM

You don't need to use the command prompt to run chkdsk /r in XP.

 

Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter.

 

When  new screen comes up, type Y and hit Enter.

 

Reboot the system, the chkdsk /r will run before trying to boot into Windows.

 

Louis



#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 05:15 PM

Sorry for the confusion I may have caused. It is a little while since I have used XP on a routine basis, and while I have two laptops under my control which run XP, I didn't have one of them handy to check. Hamluis is right !

 

They say the memory is the first thing to go !

 

Chris Cosgrove


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 04 December 2013 - 05:15 PM.


#9 stephy1977

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 07:52 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I appreciate your collaborative efforts on this, and I feel reassured knowing that I wasn't doing something wrong!  The same might not be true now, however; I typed in chkdsk /r into the run comment, hit Enter, and then hit Y and enter.  I restarted and got the blue screen running through the check files/folders process and then it said that it was checking free space.  When finished my computer just started normally.  I did not get a black screen saying that chkdsk was running at any point.  Did I do something wrong?  Please let me know if you have any idea what I missed!!

 

Thanks again so much and in advance!!!

S



#10 hamluis

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 12:03 PM

The time it takes to run varies...according to partition size and condition of partition.

 

Before drawing any conclusions...try running it again, just as you did before.

 

If a BSOD occurs this time...I'd take that as a sign of a hard drive problem or a partition problem.  Please write down the exact wording of the error message, if such occurs and you can read it.  Post such in next post.

 

Louis



#11 stephy1977

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:56 PM

Thanks for the reply!!  i did what you suggested - reran chkdsk just as before.  When I restarted it went to a blue screen which said that it was checking disks, ran through that to 100%, then said was checking free space, went to 100% of that, then started as normal (without any additional warnings or messages).  I did a 'test' after that and tried to save something from a memory stick onto my desktop - got a message that the save couldn't complete because of a problem with the drive... this doesn't look good, does it?

 

Any further advice, or should I just start computer shopping?



#12 hamluis

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:43 AM

Immediately attempt to move any valued data files...from that drive.

 

Louis






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