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Need some help choosing a hard disk drive


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#1 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 05:33 AM

So, I could use some help choosing a hard disk drive. I'll be using a Samsung 840 Pro Series solid state drive for the operating system. The hard disk drive will be used to store movies and music. My movie and music player will be located on the solid state drive, and I will be playing movie and music files from the hard disk drive. Should I be concerned about performance, or should I focus on getting something that runs quieter and cooler? Reviewers seem to have mixed feelings about how noisy a particular hard disk drive is. For example, some reviewers say the WD Black is too noisy while others say it is quiet. This is also true for the Seagate Barracuda, which is the drive I am considering getting because the 2 TB model is cheaper than the WD Black 2 TB model. What do you think? 

 

This is the hard disk drive I am considering getting: http://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Barracuda-3-5-Inch-Internal-ST2000DM001/dp/B005T3GRN2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1385718961&sr=8-3&keywords=seagate+barracuda

 

I must say that I have become hesitant getting the drive after reading a review by one reviewer who started a long discussion discussing that Seagate has given two drives that are manufactured differently (One drive has 2 platters and the other 3 platters) the same model number. It's stated that the model with 3 platters is inferior to the one with 2 platters. 


Edited by Dark Magician Girl, 29 November 2013 - 05:43 AM.


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#2 JHMcG

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 05:49 PM

In my experience WD HDDs are the best. But even they vary in quality depending on which model you buy. I personally prefer to have 3 or more smaller HDDs rather than 1 huge one, so that in the event of HDD failure, I have duplicate copies of my files stored on other HDDs.



#3 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:19 AM

Well, I have a XPS 410 and it only has two drive bays. One of them will be occupied by the SSD, so I only have room for one HDD. I do have an external drive which can be used for backups, though. 



#4 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:23 AM

I may try the WD Red if it is still available at Micro Center when I get out there. If not, I'll probably get the Barracuda. I should be able to check the model number there so I know whether I'm getting the 2 platter or 3 platter version. 



#5 Scoop8

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 09:08 AM

I checked out the Amazon link and that HDD looks like a great price for a 2 Tb Seagate.

 

I looked at some reviews and as with anything, diversity is the one constant with review feedback.

 

I've used Seagate Barracuda HDD's for years with no failures or issues but everyone has brand preferences.

 



#6 rotor123

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 11:38 AM

Hi, I've been using Seagate drives sine the 80s. My first hard drive was a 20 megabyte MFM drive.

 

I have Seagate, Western Digital, Samsung, Hitachi, Toshiba Hard drives. I also have Intel, Samsung SSD drives.

 

I can not a finger at any of those brands as being worse than any other brand.

 

Hard Drives are easily damaged in shipping. In my opinion many of the User reports of DOA and short life are actually based on how they were packed and handled in shipping. I'm lucky that My Hard drive purchases come out of a Distribution facility less than 20 miles away. The UPS driver follows the shipping instructions to place inside the front porch. He even Sits them on the from door sill and Knocks so I know they are there. No complaints about the service there. They come well packed.

 

However If I were out in the boonies, I'd be buying Retail packaged drives rather than OEM drives. The Retail packaging is designed by the manufacturers to allow the drives to survive shipping.

 

Roger


Edited by rotor123, 02 December 2013 - 10:40 AM.

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#7 Scoop8

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 07:04 PM

↑   2qi4ppz.jpg

 

I've had good luck from Amazon shipping with HDD's thus far.

 

I have a friend that uses WD, just feels comfortable with that brand and hasn't had any failures for years with WD.



#8 davnel

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 07:50 AM

I actually have two solutions to that problem. First, I use a Sans Digital Hardware RAID array, in RAID 1 (mirrored) on an eSATA port. This is my main data repository. It has four 2TB drives in it. They happen to be Seagate but could be anything that functions. This setup gets powered up a couple of times per week and has not failed in two years.

 

Secondly, I have a 4TB ZyXEL NAS connected to the network. This drive acts as backup for the Sans Digital, and is on the network to provide a data source for the wireless devices.

 

My main computer has a 640GB WD drive for data that contains a subset of the big iron contents, for data that is used daily. That drive gets backed up to the RAID, which gets backed up to the NAS on Sunday night each week.

 

I update a master archive folder on the RAID each week during the backups. This folder contains a cumulative collection of all data files since the system was built. This provides a total backup of all data files and could be used to rebuild the other drives. The master archive is also backed up to a third 2TB external drive just in case.

 

The RAID also contains the latest Acronis backup of my main boot drive, updated each week. At the moment, my system dual boots Windows 7 Ultimate 64 and Windows 8.1 Pro 64. The Acronis backup is a full disk image.

 

Finally, I create a clone of the boot drive and swap it with the current boot drive each week. Same for the daily data drive. These drives are plug-ins on the front panel of the computer using Antec Easy-SATA adapters.

 

The main reason for this diatribe is that the daily data disk (the 640GB WD) can, in fact, be any type or brand you happen to have available, as long as it's big enough for your daily data files. If you only use the data files occasionally, a weekly backup schedule would work fine. If you have heavy use, you might want to do a daily or more frequent backup. In any event, if the drive fails (make that WHEN), you can reconstruct it from the backups easily. Based on that, the quality of the drive is not that important. You should always keep a, no more than one week old, clone of the data drive handy, and update or clone the offline data drive weekly, at least. I swap them after the update to keep wear even. That's where the Antec adapters come in handy.

 

Acronis is great for full disk backups. I use Beyond Compare to update and sync drives and folders. BTW, Beyond Compare also has a Linux version, and you can purchase a dual  (Windows AND Linux) product key for $20 US more.

 

.


Edited by davnel, 02 December 2013 - 07:55 AM.


#9 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 07:18 AM

I just picked up a WD Green and the 2-platter version of the Barracuda. The Salesman recommended the WD Green for my intended purpose (to player movies and music from) after I inquired about the WD Red. He said the RPM speed only affects file access although not by much and large file transfers, and it won't affect video and music performance. The WD Green seems like a great drive for my intended purpose. The lower RPM speed should allow it to run cooler and quieter than the Barracuda. There is something I forgot to ask him. Does RPM have an affect on files being downloaded directly to the drive, or is that entirely dependent upon internet connection? 

 

I'm not sure if I'll be able to pull this off in the XPS 410, but I thought about getting two 2.5" drives and mounting them in a 2.5-3.5" drive converter using a Raid 1 configuration. What do you think about this? Though, 2.5" drives with a lot of storage seem to be hard to come by. I can only find this drive on Amazon:

 

http://www.amazon.com/HGST-Travelstar-2-5-Inch-Internal-0J28001/dp/B00EDIU5IW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386071337&sr=8-1&keywords=2.5+2+tb+hard+disk+drive

 

There is also this drive, but it doesn't have as much storage as I would like:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Western-Digital-Scorpio-Internal-2-5-Inch/dp/B004I9J5OG/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1386072906&sr=8-10&keywords=2.5+hard+disk+drive



#10 Kilroy

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 12:38 PM

I'd say that size is the most important factor that you should consider.

 

How much space do you want/need?

 

How much can you afford to spend?

 

For another $13 you can go with Seagate Barracuda 7200.14 ST3000DM001 3TB

 

All hard drives fail eventually, it doesn't who makes it.  I've used drives from most of the major manufacturers over the years and all of them failed at one point or another.  I'm currently using Seagate, Hitachi, and Toshiba drives in my machine right now.

 

 



#11 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:20 PM

Well, my Seagate external is 1 TB and it's nearly maxed out. I don't think I will need that much more space. The HGST Traveler at 1.5 TB seems reasonable enough. I don't think I'll need anything more than 2 TB. The 3 TB Barracuda is $30 more than what I paid for a retail version of the 2 TB Barracuda at Micro Center. Micro Center also had a 3 TB Barracuda for about $30 more. I thought about it but I didn't think I needed that much space.

 

I'm concerned that if I get a 2 TB drive I won't be able to perform backups on my 1 TB external drive due to the significant size difference, though. I considered the HGST Traveler because I could mount two of them in my system in a Raid 1 configuration in case one of them fails. Then, I can just use my external drive to image the solid state drive which will contain my OS.






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