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Hard drive free space WAY off


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#1 jdm1677

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 05:23 PM

I'm using windows 7 (64bit), I have a 500GB C drive and a 1TB data drive. This computer is mainly for music recording/editing and a little bit of video editing. I use the 1TB D drive to store all of my music and video related projects. I have a lot of stuff on that drive, mostly high quality, uncompressed audio files, but with that said, there is no way that I am using the amount of space that windows says I am using. Looking at every folder and subfolder I have on the drive, I am only using 93GB for music and video files, and less than 1GB for miscelanneous files but Windows says that only 38GB of 931GB is left! It should actually be 837GB left. So 799GB just magically disappeared into space?? What's going on?  I've had the computer for two years and it has always been accurate with it's free space estimates. I just noticed this last week. What should I do? 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 06:59 PM

Run the chkdsk /r command on the drive in question.

 

Then...use fhe following tool to see what is where on the drive:  WinDirStat .

 

Louis



#3 jdm1677

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 07:36 PM

Thanks. I discovered that windows has been automatically creating rather large backups for that hard drive. It is putting the backup data into dated folders, going back to spring of this year. I wonder if it has been doing this all along and just deleting the backups before the disk runs out of space or if this just started this year. All of the backups are only from this year and I don't ever remember asking my computer to start doing this. Nonetheless, I have the option to delete as much of the folders as I'd like to. Is this safe? Deleting old backup folders won't damage the files that I need to use now right? 



#4 hamluis

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 10:34 AM

I don't use the Windows backup tool so I can't say how it might operate.

 

I suggest you read up on it and see if the backups are cumulative...if so, then (logically) there's only one that needs to be retained, unless you desire to return the system to an earlier state in the future.

 

I have tons of storage space so I keep all backups I make within the previous year.  My thinking is that...if there is something I needed or wanted and I haven't accessed a backup within a year, I must be satisified with the current state of affairs.

 

Louis



#5 technonymous

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 11:51 AM

The backup feature in 7 will probably by default backup to a secondary drive than say a partitioned primary drive. Usually you run into the problem that the primary or paritition isn't large enough as windows backup doesn't use compression. I use third party True Image software. Create a complete clone to the second drive and then create a True Image boot disc. In the event of disc failure or a nasty virus you can recover completely. Next best thing is a RAID 0+1 with 4 hd's, which is doable in a home desktop pc enviroment and won't break the bank.



#6 jdm1677

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 06:38 PM

Alright then, easy enough, thanks for getting me started! 



#7 hamluis

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 06:53 PM

:thumbup2: , happy computing :).

 

Louis






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