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Chkdsk cancels itself when set to run at boot XP pro SP3


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#1 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 01:16 AM

Hi --

I'm a bit vexed, as I do not have a boot disk nor Recovery Console -- this machine shipped with a preload so I do not have MS OS disks. At the moment I do not have a recent backup -- too many moves, backup drives not handy.    XP Pro SP3, drive sounds OK no known mechanical damage

What's wrong:
I have some file system errors after swapping the battery when it was in sleep, not hibernate. I can't run CHKDSK at boot, it self-cancels despite repeated attempts.

What I've tried so for:
Ran CHKDSK within Windows, thus read-only. It found a modest number of errors.
Query with FSUTIL to check if the volume dirty bit is set as intended, yes.
Ran SFC/ scannow once. Don't know where the log is nor if it fixed anything.
Checked the registry BootExecute for the autocheck variable, when not set to scan read autocheck autochk *, if chkdsk was set is shows which drive and switch.
Ran a bad sectors check from within windows, just to "do something".

 

Ran chksdk /i again, just because. Result:

CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
File verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
Index verification completed.
CHKDSK is recovering lost files.
CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 3)...
Security descriptor verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...
Repairing Usn Journal file record segment.
Usn Journal verification completed.
Correcting errors in the master file table's (MFT) BITMAP attribute.
Correcting errors in the Volume Bitmap.
Windows found problems with the file system.
Run CHKDSK with the /F (fix) option to correct these.

Set the /F bit again

Running Seatools short test. It's not very short.
Rebooting after this post

I'm out of ideas... err, out of ideas copy/pasted from Google IT Training ;-).  
This can't be that hard... what can I do?



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#2 noknojon

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 02:43 AM

Hello Atanasoff
So far you have not run the Repair (or as you say "Fix version" of a disk check.

The repair version will run 5 stages and take (on average) from 1 to 2 hours.

 

Copy and Paste the Code below into Run Box.

NOTE - This code is for XP based systems only -

Hit Enter and it will reboot your computer after 30 seconds then run a full 5 stage check on your HDD.

CMD /C ECHO Y|CHKDSK C: /R | SHUTDOWN /R /T 30

This will in no way hurt anything as I have used this code for many years -

Repeat - NOTE - This code is for XP based systems only -

 

After the check is completed it will reboot your computer back to Normal Mode.

If this is a laptop make sure it is plugged into a reliable power source.

Never force a Reboot during a check as you can lose data and damage the computer -

 

Thank You -


Edited by noknojon, 11 November 2013 - 03:21 AM.


#3 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 03:23 AM

I've been attempting to run it with the repair option, but if I set chkdsk /f   then

 

when the machine boots, the screen reads (not verbatim) 

a disk check has been scheduled ....

disk check cancelled.

 

It seems whenever I manually set a check to happen at boot, whether through a cmd box or via the gui it will be cancelled. Doesn't seem to matter if I do /F or /F /R.

 

I did get a short check to run once; that was after the following bollix

i) going into Access IBM on boot, hoping to find a disk check utility (it's on old thinkpad)

ii) trying safe mode character --- machine hung with the drive light on

iii) trying safe mode gui          ---- machine hung with the drive light on

In both cases I had to force power off (ouch).

Then, it ran a check on C:, but not a surface scan.

 

Now, it still ignores my requests to chkdsk at the next boot. And, safe mode still has trouble launching, though it didn't totally hang. So, the last run-through fixed something, just not the original problem.

 

Could something be corrupt in the registry that tells the machine "hey, why doncha just ignore this chkdsk thing, this user isn't authorized to do that" or some such?



#4 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 03:42 AM

Am trying again now with MSconfig set to diagnostic boot. No idea if this is relevant, I'm at the point of throwing stuff to see what sticks.



#5 noknojon

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 04:33 AM

OK -

Only time that I have never seen that code work - Use THIS .......

 

Run a Disk Check on your C: drive in Windows XP:
• Click Start and open My Computer
• Right-click on C: (or your hard drive letter) and select Properties
• Click on the Tools tab
• Under Error-checking click the Check Now... button
• Mark the 2 boxes next to Automatically fix file system errors and Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors
• Click on the Start button
When the message box pops up, click the Schedule disk check button and Restart your computer
• Once your computer restarts it will check the drive, don't press any keys so that it is allowed to do so

This will take (on average) 1 to 2 hours depending on your system, so please let it finish.
DO NOT force a reboot once started a you will lose data and may damage the computer
NOTE - If this is a Laptop please plug it into a reliable power source, as batteries may fail.
The computer will reboot to normal mode once it has completed all 5 stages -


Edited by noknojon, 11 November 2013 - 04:39 AM.


#6 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:27 AM

Odd. After a bunch of things, including manually forcing the dirty bit via FSutil, I've gotten the following to happen:

 

Shutdown

Startup

--- Message that a disk check has been scheduled

--- almost immediately, message that it has been canceled

--- another message that windows will check the disk

--- chkdsk starts running, but does not do the hours long test

.... except, once, it went through 5 steps, with the last being "checking files". 

 

But I can't cause this via the Schedule disk check button , I've tried that a bunch of times and it always leads to the  scheduled/cancelled routine, except once after a bunch of fiddling and using MSConfig

WT-H is jumping in to cancel chkdsk?   Something wrong in the registry?

Event viewer complains that some service is not unloading soon enough:

Windows saved user (machine\username) registry while an application or service was still using the registry during log off. The memory used by the user's registry has not been freed. The registry will be unloaded when it is no longer in use.

 This is often caused by services running as a user account, try configuring the services to run in either the LocalService or NetworkService account.

 

I generally have no issues with this machine, I don't visit game or download sites and alway have AV running.  I'm stumped!

 

I'm going to use CMD /C ECHO Y|CHKDSK C: /R | SHUTDOWN /R /T 30 now: when you suggested it I was already rebooting. It seems similar to   start/run/cmd then chkdsk /F /R, respond to the promt with Y, reboot, which didn't work. However I'll try it.

 

btw, the disk has 2 partitions, C and D, if that matters.  Whatever the problem is affects both equally.
 



#7 davnel

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:41 AM

What is the exact make/model of this machine? Does it have a hidden "Recovery" partition? You can see by subtracting the total size of C and D from the size of the disk. There should be 4 or 5 GB left over if the recovery partition exists. If so, the BIOS may have an entry to "Restore Computer to Factory Defaults". Back up all existing data from C and D. Run the recovery routine - which, again, might be a BIOS choice or might require a "secret handshake" key combination during POST.



#8 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:19 AM

What is the exact make/model of this machine? Does it have a hidden "Recovery" partition? You can see by subtracting the total size of C and D from the size of the disk. There should be 4 or 5 GB left over if the recovery partition exists. If so, the BIOS may have an entry to "Restore Computer to Factory Defaults". Back up all existing data from C and D. Run the recovery routine - which, again, might be a BIOS choice or might require a "secret handshake" key combination during POST.

 

This is an IBM Thinkpad T40p, sys board is T50 (these machines were at the start of the no-lead solder era, plus this particular rev  lacks the chassis reinforcment of later models. The main board it has now was reworked in some factory in Enland with real solder). 

Yes, it has a recovery partition. I've activated the utility, but I could not see an option to run a dos prompt and fix the disk. I'd think it's in there somewhere, but I'm not situatied to start the wipe-out-and-restore routine.

 

I'm sorta paranoid about keeping the machine in a clean condition for now. There's years of data, configuration, and things such as browser plugins which I'm not confident will be backed up and restored. I don't have my backup drive, original software install disks or a spare machine handy at the moment, not even a boot disk with tools. Much of the data is associated with one or another program, I don't know how identify, back up and restore it all other than doing a full disk image...  but then I'd be saving whatever's corrupt in the current image.

 

The CD/DVD writer does work, so I could make one or more boot disks with diagnostics... but, umm, I don't know where to start with that.  Related, I'm dealing with health issues, so I have only brief periods where I can think, after that the brain starts shutting down, then everything else. So, I try to keep everything in order and head off issues before they start. 

 

I just tried CMD /C ECHO Y|CHKDSK C: /R | SHUTDOWN /R /T 30 twice, the second time standing away from the machine so it could not possible sense a keypress.

Result:

"Disk check sceduled..."

Counts 10, 9

"Disk check cancelled"

then it boots normally.

That's pretty much what it's been doing every time I try to scedule a normal chkdsk. I can run a "scan for and recover.." from within Windows, but I'm not worried about the disk hardware (it passed Seatools check) the problem is in what's written on it.

 

Perhaps I should make a boot disk with diagnostic tools beyond chkdsk, can y'all point me to either a disk image or instructions to make one? 

Does anyone here know the sequence of events at boot time, so it can be determined what can jump in front of the disk check?  It seems that chkdsk is still there and can run if triggered by something other than the normal command (such as the dirty bit), or the one boot with MSConfig set to diag -- that was tedious, as the machine was pretty useless until it was rebooted with MSConfig off.

 

I'm out of ideas. It does boot up in normal mode, but something is clearly wrong, and typically one problem leads to others.  I have nothing to back up to right now, and once I retrieve a drive it's not practical for me to go back to XP SP1 and try to download everything. This has to be one corrupt entry somewhere, the disk hardware is OK.


Edited by Atanasoff, 11 November 2013 - 11:25 AM.


#9 davnel

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:37 AM

If you have separate DVD media for any version of XP, you might try the following:

1. boot up on the media

2. Select Repair the Computer from the install screen (lower left)

3. Select Recovery Console

4. Enter the command "fixmbr"

5. Enter the command "fixboot"

enter the command "exit", remove the DVD, and reboot. It might be fixed.

This sequence might be slightly off...I haven't tried it in years. Google "XP recovery console"

See this:  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307654



#10 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:38 AM

Hm, one thought. The AV could be doing this. I can't disable it completly unless I cut the net connection, so I'm going to change the AV startup options, somewhere in there is an option to have the AV load "early" which probably means at boot time.



#11 dc3

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:46 AM

If you suspect a corrupted file run sfc /scannow.

 

 
The sfc /scannow command scans all protected system files and replaces corrupted and incorrect versions with correct Microsoft versions.
 
During this scan you may be prompted to insert your installation disc in the DVD/CD drive, if you have this disc you will want to have it available before you start the scan.  If you don't have this disc and are prompted for it you will need to follow the *instructions below for locating the i386 file. 
 
To initiate this scan go to Start, click on Run and type in sfc /scannow then press enter.  Please note the space between sfc and /scannow.
 
If files are found during this scan which need to be replaced you may be prompted to insert your installation disc, do so at that time.   If it doesn't ask you for the disc this means that it wasn't necessary to replace any files.   In the event the the system asks you for the disc, you must visit Windows Update immediately after the scan is completed (Please note that there won't be any confirmation dialog - the program will just exit without telling you anything).
 
***Warning, the steps below involve entering the Registry.  If a mistake is made there this can render your computer inoperable.  For this reason I suggest that you first back up the rigistry.***
 
Backup Your Registry with ERUNT 
 
Please download  ERUNT.
 
For the version with the Installer:  Use the setup program to install ERUNT on your computer.
 
For the zipped version:  Unzip all the files into a folder of your choice.
 
Important:  For the zipped version you will need a program lik 7-Zip to unzip the files.
 
Click on Erunt.exe to backup your registry to the folder of your choice.
 
In the event you need to restore your registry, run ERUNT from folder C:\WINDOWS\ERUNT\ (the date the backup was made shoule go here.)
 
*If you do not have this disc you will need to locate a directory on your system which is named i386. You will need to search for this in the registry, to do this type in regedit in the Search programs and files box and then press Enter, you will see a screen similar to the one below.
 
registrysnip_zps5dd5b3c6.png
 
To find this you will need to navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup 
 
You will see the list of HKEY options, please notice the arrow to the left of the option, when you click on this arrow the menu will expand and you will be able to find the next step “SOFTWARE”, expand the menu on this option and proceed till you reach “Setup”.  Under “Setup” you will need to find “SourcePath”.  The SourcePath probably has an entry pointing to your CD-ROM drive, and that is why it is asking for the XP CD. This needs to be changed it to C:\, to do this double click on SourcePath, a box will open where you will make this change by typing in C:\.
 
Restart your computer now and try running the scan again.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:00 PM

If you have separate DVD media for any version of XP, you might try the following:

1. boot up on the media

2. Select Repair the Computer from the install screen (lower left)

3. Select Recovery Console

4. Enter the command "fixmbr"

5. Enter the command "fixboot"

enter the command "exit", remove the DVD, and reboot. It might be fixed.

This sequence might be slightly off...I haven't tried it in years. Google "XP recovery console"

See this:  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307654

 

Been there. As stated, I have no disks to create recovery console, like most laptops, the OS is preloaded w a customized mfr image.  Can't find the recovery console separately, MS seems to have taken it down from all public sites.

I don't want to randomly fuss with the MBR without a d-mn good reason, you can render your machine unbootable with that. Only time I've used that is when a machine will not boot into a previously good OS, which is not the case here .



#13 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:35 PM

"If you suspect a corrupted file run sfc /scannow."

 

As stated, I did that previously.   No disks, like most preisntalled machines, it has an i386 dir with the now ancient XP original files.



#14 dc3

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:46 PM

The instructions I posted address how to access the i386 file and how to use it.

 

The possibility that this file is corrupt is very slim.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 Atanasoff

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:55 PM

The instructions I posted address how to access the i386 file and how to use it.

 

The possibility that this file is corrupt is very slim.

 

K. Looks like the files are compressed; in my i386 dir all files end with _, e.g I have " AUTOCHK.EX_ ".   I take it I need to uncompress that file?

 

I have run SFC/Scannow, which completed OK. It's already pointed to the i386 dir, it does not prompt for a CD.  How can I find if it's safe to use the old autochk, it could have been replaced by a patch or SP several times by now.






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