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compaq booting to cursor; no bios; good hard drive


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#1 mvcdustin

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 08:33 PM

I have a Compaq Presario CQ60-410US that is acting up. It is running 32-bit Windows Vista.

 

Here is what is happening:

- I turn power on the computer and it goes straight to a black screen with a single cursor ( _ ) without ever showing the BIOS.

 

Solutions I have tried:

- I have checked the connections to the 2.5' SATA drive and everything seems solid. Contacts are clean.

- I checked the connection to the CMOS battery and that seemed to be in good order as well.

- I checked to make sure the RAM was snapped in correctly and it, in fact, was.

 

[notes:]

- The small LED light on the front right below the HDD symbol isn't lighting up.

-  After placing the hard-drive back into the laptop, for some unknown-to-me reason, it started working; it booted into the BIOS and then into Vista and was working properly with stability. But, strangely enough, I turned off the computer and went to bed and upon turning it on after waking up, I am stuck at square one trying to figure out what the issue may be.

- I suspect that the power supply is faulty due to strange high-pitch sounds coming from the powerbrick. The battery was dead when I received this computer, and now I think I know why. Will be getting a milimeter tester to test theory.

 

--

 

update 1 (11/10/13 @ 2:08a) One gentleman below suggested that replacing the CMOS battery may, in fact, solve the issue. Can anyone second this? Thanks.


Edited by mvcdustin, 11 November 2013 - 03:09 AM.


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#2 JHMcG

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 08:50 PM

Couple of possible isues might be causing this. 1) Try replacing the mobo's cmos battery. If dead that does cause bios problems.

2) If the HDD is a SATA drive, that is another source of problems. Reason being that SATA cables plugin VERY loosely, and yet the cables are VERY stiff, so they tend to unplug themselves if there is a bend in the cable anywhere near the plugin points. i.e. the ends of the cables.

 

Friend of mine had this problem too, SATA cables unplugging themselves. I told him to open up the machine, and work bends into the cables at the points where they have to bend, so they become permanantly BENT to the requizite amount at the places where they have to bend, so they don't "UNPLUG THEMSELVES".  



#3 mvcdustin

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 08:59 PM

Couple of possible isues might be causing this. 1) Try replacing the mobo's cmos battery. If dead that does cause bios problems.

2) If the HDD is a SATA drive, that is another source of problems. Reason being that SATA cables plugin VERY loosely, and yet the cables are VERY stiff, so they tend to unplug themselves if there is a bend in the cable anywhere near the plugin points. i.e. the ends of the cables.

 

Friend of mine had this problem too, SATA cables unplugging themselves. I told him to open up the machine, and work bends into the cables at the points where they have to bend, so they become permanantly BENT to the requizite amount at the places where they have to bend, so they don't "UNPLUG THEMSELVES".  

It's a laptop.



#4 mvcdustin

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 03:09 AM

Can I get some more opinions? Bump.



#5 Roodo

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:10 PM

Yes, reboot the computer and update the drive controller.



#6 mvcdustin

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:48 PM

Yes, reboot the computer and update the drive controller.


How do I update the drive controller if I cant even get into the BIOS?

#7 JHMcG

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:57 PM

Laptops, (Battery operated toys), also have CMOS Batteries. Try replacing the mobo's CMOS battery, but be careful doing that, because some manufacturers solder their connections to the board. i.e. crooks who want to force you to buy a new "Craptop" when the CMOS battery dies.



#8 bludgard

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:38 PM

I suspect the laptop has overheated and the solder has fractured around the IGP (integrated graphics processor) and/or the CPU causing the BIOS/POST/Boot failure. Maybe wrapping it in a towel until it shuts itself off (or after 30 minutes - whichever comes first) will help if one cannot reflow the mobo.

Do not pay for the reflow to be done; the board is already toast: Cannot cause any more damaged....

Please remove the HDD before overheating for reflow.


Edited by bludgard, 13 November 2013 - 09:29 AM.


#9 MrBruce1959

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 12:42 AM

If I may intervene here. Before I would risk burning up a perfectly good motherboard, I would suggest giving the CMOS battery replacement a try.

 

I am offering some helpful links that may assist you in replacing your laptop battery yourself. The most difficult part of disassembling any laptop is having the correct direction for doing the job without causing unneeded damage to your laptop case and it's internal ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) ribbon cables and connectors. Those you have to use extreme care not to brake the flip levers that hold the flat ribbon cables in their connectors.

 

Please go to this link, http://www.insidemylaptop.com/remove-motherboard-from-compaq-presario-cq50-cq60-cq70-laptop/  or download this PDF document and save it for future reference http://tim.id.au/laptops/hp/hp%20g60%20compaq%20presario%20cq60.pdf read and follow the instructions first, before actually attempting to do anything contained in them. This allows you to look over the instructions and pictures provided and familiarize yourself with what has to be done to disassemble your laptop to the point that the CMOS battery is exposed. Each page has some form of information on how to gain access to your CMOS battery in a safe manner.

 

By the way, the second link I provided you with above is an Adobe Reader .pdf document, which you can save on your computer for future reference. It shows a fully exploded view of your laptop and all of it's components, plus a replacement parts list to boot! In this document the CMOS battery is also called the RTC Battery both names mean the same part. At the first link I provided, STEP 5 shows your CMOS battery. This battery has two wires attached to it and a nylon connector at the end of it. If you have a Radio Shack store near by, take it to them and they should have a replacement for it. The maintenance manual lists this battery as part number  501587-001

 

 

I would do that before allowing any of your internal hardware to be exposed to any extreme heat conditions, which could cause more unneeded damage and render the motherboard beyond repair.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.

 

Bruce.


Edited by MrBruce1959, 13 November 2013 - 01:00 PM.

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#10 bludgard

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 09:27 AM

Quite right, Mr. Bruce. I should refrain from offerering such radical advice or opinions: It may very well be a bad CMOS battery. Hopefully OP will get the machine up and runng with the suggested fixes; my approach does come close to an Omega effect.

Please disregard my earlier post as it may cause damage to the unit.

 



#11 Roodo

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 09:42 AM

Try a battery, reset bios.



#12 dc3

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 01:12 PM

Try a battery, reset bios.

 

This has already been suggested twice before.

 

By the way, when you remove the battery the BIOS automatically will resort to the default settings.  When the battery is replaced this will happen, so they will not need to rest the BIOS. :thumbup2:


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#13 JHMcG

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:33 PM

The immediately preceeding post is WRONG, unless you leave the battery out for some hours. Capacitance can maintain BIOS settings for some time. Ideally, remove the CMOS battery, then if possible, clear the CMOS, (Bios), then put in the new battery, and reset the bios. 



#14 dc3

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:56 PM

The immediately preceeding post is WRONG, unless you leave the battery out for some hours. Capacitance can maintain BIOS settings for some time. Ideally, remove the CMOS battery, then if possible, clear the CMOS, (Bios), then put in the new battery, and reset the bios. 

 

It takes a matter of seconds.  Thirty seconds is what is suggested. :thumbup2:


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#15 JHMcG

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 06:11 PM

I don't use "Craptops", but in one of my desktops, it took over two hours for the bios to reset. 






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