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Windows 7 BSOD Error: 0x00000124 and 0x00000116


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47 replies to this topic

#31 dc3

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 10:19 AM

my screen has now been turning red when im running the computer on safemode...

 

If the distortion is happening in Safe Mode then it isn't a driver.  When the computer is in Safe Mode the graphics driver used is a native Windows driver, hence the poor quality of the video.  Since the graphics drivers normally used are not being used in Safe Mode we can assume that the distortion is either a result of the graphics card or the monitor.


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#32 grashoper25

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:52 PM

So do you think if I would just buy the same graphics card I had before it would fix all my problems???? cause its only like $20-$30 ranged one which isn't a problem??



#33 davnel

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 06:16 PM

FYI:

 

HP-Specs:  http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?cc=us&lc=en&docname=c01154933#N96

Documents:   http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/manualCategory?cc=us&lc=en&product=3550550

Support:    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?cc=us&lc=en&dlc=en&product=3550550

 

Based on the specs, this machine has both built-in graphics and an NVidia 8400GS card.



#34 grashoper25

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 07:55 PM

so what are you trying to say? Do you think it would fix it?

#35 davnel

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:35 PM

Let's solve one thing at a time.  On looking at the picture of the inside of your machine, the first thing I noticed was the accumulated crud in the CPU heatsink. You need to shut the system down, remove the CPU fan, clean it and remove the dust from the heatsink. Next, since the 8500 board has a fan, you should remove the board, remove the shell around the fan and heatsink, and clean them both. DO THIS BEFORE ANYTHING ELSE. According to Speccy, the temps on both the CPU and the video card are much too high and can cause most of what you are seeing. Clean the rest of the case out while you're at it.

 

I'll also add that both disks are filled to 97%. That makes paging to disk almost impossible. Also, there's not enough room for maintenance functions on them. You need to figure out what's filling them up, and store it on an external drive or something, and clean off those disks. In their present state, you don't have room to install anything on either one.

.


Edited by davnel, 08 December 2013 - 03:03 AM.


#36 dc3

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:45 PM

The CPU temperature is high enough to be concerned with.  As suggested, you should clean the fan and heat-sink assembly.  You don't need to remove the fan in order to clean the heat-sink and fan, this can be done with canned air along with Q-tips or a soft bristle brush.  If you remove the fan from the CPU you will need to loosen the heat-sink, if this is done you should clean the old thermal compound off the CPU and heat-sink and reapply fresh compound.

 

If the GPU temperature is occurring while under a load these temperatures are not out of line.

 

Since you have both dedicated and integrated graphics try removing the dedicated card and run the integrated to see if the problem persists.


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#37 davnel

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 02:18 PM

Good point, Louis. I usually just remove the heatsink assembly and clean, cleaning off and replacing the thermal compound. IMHO, 6 years or more is long enough to justify the cleanup of the thermal compound.

 

In this machine, HP has not implemented the integrated graphics. They do that only when they don't install a video card.

 

As for the temperature problem, I've seen a couple of reports from his machine with temps over 75C. I don't believe Speccy even loads the CPU minimally so those are idle temps.

 

The final problem is a pair of seriously overstuffed disks. He has no room to do anything, in either disk. Gotta clean them up.

.



#38 dc3

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 03:34 PM

The final problem is a pair of seriously overstuffed disks. He has no room to do anything, in either disk. Gotta clean them up.

 

I addressed this in post #29. :thumbup2:


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#39 davnel

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 03:52 PM

Forgive me please, but I'm not sure where your info in Post 29 came from. This is what's in his speccy report:

 

SAMSUNG HD320KJ ATA Device

SATA type: SATA-II 3.0Gb/s

 

Partition 0

Partition ID: Disk #0, Partition #0

Disk Letter: C:

File System: NTFS

Size: 289 GB

Used Space: 279 GB (97%)

Free Space: 10.4 GB (3%)

 

Partition 1

Partition ID: Disk #0, Partition #1

Disk Letter: D:

File System: NTFS

Size: 9.05 GB

Used Space: 8.33 GB (93%)

Free Space: 730 MB (7%)

 

 

 

SAMSUNG HD320KJ ATA Device

SATA type: SATA-II 3.0Gb/s

Capacity: 298 GB

 

Partition 0

Disk Letter: E:

Size: 298 GB

Used Space: 278 GB (94%)

Free Space: 19.8 GB (6%)

 

Both disks are jammed full. He needs to offload a bunch from each to even keep operating.


Edited by davnel, 08 December 2013 - 03:52 PM.


#40 dc3

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 04:29 PM

You have the same information that I have from their Speccy.  The C: drive is the important drive since this is where the operating system is located.  This is what should be addressed immediately.  The other hdd is full, but it will not effect the C: drive, so it is of less importance at this time.

 

Hopefully this will answer your question and allow grashoper25 to rejoin in their own topic.


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#41 davnel

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 04:59 PM

Louis:

The C drive contains Vista. He had installed Windows 7 on drive E, and booted from E, according to the Environment Variables which say SystemRoot is E:\Windows.

 

I do not intend to get into an argument with you. My intention is to solve his problem as expeditiously as possible. That requires 1) cleaning out the excessive dust, 2) emptying the hard drives, and 3) either reestablishing Vista, or installing Win 7 over it, ON C.

If you don't want my participation, say so...I'll go away. Otherwise, get off your high horse.



#42 dc3

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:00 PM

The Windows 7 was a trial version.  In post #4 it was pointed out that the activation of Windows 7 has failed.  The only other known Windows operating system on this computer is Vista which is on the C: drive.  Because of the dates in the dump file (April of 2012) it is safe to assume that Vista has been in use up until the trial version of Windows 7 was installed.  This is why jhayz suggested using the C: drive.  

 

There are a number of contributing factors here, so we are looking at taking care of individual problems till we can get a handle of what the main problem is.  It would be good to hear back from grashoper as to what suggestions they have followed and what hasn't so we will have a better idea of just where this stands.

 

There are no egos or high horses here, we are all trying to help grashoper25 get their computer repaired.  And no one has suggested that they don't want your participation.

 

By the way, my name is not Louis, it's dc3. :thumbup2:


Edited by dc3, 09 December 2013 - 09:52 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#43 davnel

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:10 PM

My apologies for the name confusion. I agree with the assessment. I'm thinking we should get him to back up both drives to an external, then reformat drive 2. I'm reading the Troubleshooting guide for instructions on how to do a factory default restoration. I'll get back to you shortly.

.



#44 davnel

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:19 PM

Here's the restore to factory default procedure:

BTW, this results in a clean install of Vista, all drivers, and any software the machine came with.

This is from the "Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide" HP #c01152960.pdf

 

 

System recovery at system startup

If Windows Vista is not responding, but the computer is working, use these steps to perform a system recovery

 

=================================================================================

NOTE: System recovery deletes all data and programs that you created or installed after purchase. Therefore, ensure you back up any data that you want to keep onto a removable disc.

=================================================================================

 

1 Turn off the computer. If necessary, press and hold the On button until the computer turns off.

 

2 Disconnect all peripheral devices from the computer, except the monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

 

3 Press the On button to turn on the computer.

 

4 Immediately, when you see the initial company logo screen appear, press the F11 key on your keyboard repeatedly until the Recovery Manager window appears.

 

5 Click Advanced options.

 

6 In the Advanced options window, click System recovery, and then Next.

 

7 Click No to back up files (if you have already done so), and then click Next. System recovery begins. After system recovery is complete, the computer restarts.

 

8 Complete the registration process, and wait until you see the desktop.

 

9 Turn off the computer, reconnect all peripheral devices, and turn the computer back on.

 

10 Perform the procedure "Performing the post-recovery procedure" on page 27.

 

>> I'll post the procedure for step 10 if requested.

.


Edited by davnel, 08 December 2013 - 06:23 PM.


#45 davnel

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 08:07 PM

P.27:

 

Performing the post-recovery procedure

1 At the Welcome to Microsoft Windows screen, follow the onscreen setup instructions, and then click Start in the last screen to display the Windows desktop.

 

2 Configure your Internet connection.

 

3 Turn off your computer, reconnect all devices that were originally connected to it, and then restart the computer.

 

4 Reinstall software that originally came in the box with your computer, and also any additional software you purchased.  _ The system recovery software might have already installed some of the software that came in the box.  _ If you installed updates to any software programs, reinstall those as well. You can typically download these updates from the software manufacturer’s Web site.

 

5 Use Windows Update to get critical updates from Microsoft: a Click the Windows Start Button, and Control Panel. b Under Security, click the Check for Updates button. c Download and install updates by clicking Install Updates.

 

6 Restart your computer. (Some updates will not finish installing until you restart.)

 

7 Use HP Update to get critical updates from HP: a Click the Windows Start Button, All Programs, the HP folder, and then HP Update. b Follow the onscreen instruction to download driver and software updates.

 

8 If you performed a backup before the system recovery, copy the backup data files from the backup media to your hard disk drive.

 

9 Ensure your system is running up-to-date security software.






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