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Laptop keyboard and touchpad not working (code 19 and code 24)


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#1 K1Vman

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 06:14 PM

Hi,

 
I have a CZ-17 laptop (from iBuyPower, subbrand of MSI I hear) running Windows 7 64x SP1.
 
The keyboard and touchpad both stopped working after I cleaned my registry with CCleaner and defragmented the OS partition of the HDD with Defraggler. (The defragmentation process has not been interrupted.)
 
The ELanTech Touchpad
 
The touchpad icons have not been loading in the task bar tray at startup. Neither could I manually start the applications associated with the touchpad from my Program Files on Drive C. 
 
Here is what I have tried without results:
 
1. Switch on the touchpad with the designated laptop function key combination (Fn + F3)
2. Restore the system to an earlier point.
3. Uninstall the device from device manager, restart and let Win7 install the right drivers and what not.
4. Install various drivers, including manufacturer recommended.
 
As of now the touchpad is hidden in the device manager and is marked with an exclamation sign. Under properties I see : This device is not present, is not working properly, or does not have all its drivers installed. (Code 24). 
 
I am using a USB mouse as I write this.
 
The Laptop Keyboard:
 
The keyboard stopped working at the same time as the touchpad (after registry cleaning and defragmentation).
Most of the time I was able to use a USB Keyboard to be able to try to fix the problem. A few times, however even the USB keyboard would not work. I noticed that when I uninstalled the ElanTech Drivers for my touchpad I saw the yellow sign with an exclamation mark for keyboards in the device manager. Under properties I could see the error: Code 19: Windows cannot start this hardware device because its configuration information (in the registry) is incomplete or damaged.
 
I have read that some recommend manipulations with the registry. I tried to remove the Upper Filters for both the mouse and keyboard (I had no idea what I was doing...) and my usb devices also stopped working. I was able to reboot to the last good version and reclaim some degree of control over my machine. 
 
Noteworthy: The laptop keyboard works fine in BIOS.
 
I have spent quite some time researching this but none of the things I came across helped me fix the described issues... Yet (:

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#2 cryptodan

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 06:22 PM

I would recommend performing a repair installation of the operating system, since you used the registry cleaning portion of CCleaner.

In addition to Broni's link Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.



#3 K1Vman

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 06:29 PM

Thank you cryptodan. I am learning this lesson the hard way. If this repair installation will wipe out all my current apps from my OS partition, I will save it as a last resort thing.


Edited by K1Vman, 07 November 2013 - 06:46 PM.


#4 cryptodan

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 06:38 PM

It will not wipe out your apps, it will perform a second installation moving your files to a windows.old directory.

#5 K1Vman

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 07:06 PM

I was reading this thread and it made me think my issues may be solved by direct registry 'surgery'.



#6 cryptodan

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 07:10 PM

Each issue should be treated as separate issues.




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