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New Motherboard and CPU


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#1 BabylonHoruv

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 03:37 PM

So my computer died, and my friend is putting in a new motherboard, CPU, and graphics cards.  It still has the old hard drive, ram, audio card, power supply, and dvd drive.

 

My question is about saving the data on the hard drive.  it has both Windows XP and Linux on it currently, I no longer have the system disk for windows XP and the data I want to save is on the XP partitition.  I have a few bitcoins in a wallet there (well, fractions of a bitcoin actually, but still, like $50 worth) as well as quite a few photos and some audio files.  I have a system disk for windows 7, and intend to install that over XP, but from hat I understand that will require reformatting that part of the drive.  

 

From what I have seen Linux will often still boot with  new mother board, I am using Ubuntu, I think version 11, but I can't get the computer turned on to check at the moment.  Anyone want to give me an idea as to how likely I am to be able to recover my stuff and if there are things I should do or avoid in order to have the best chances?



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#2 Quantum41

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 05:10 PM

well if you can attach your hard drive to an external enclosure and transfer the data onto another computer and hold it into a flash drive as either raw data or make an image file (.iso) with the drive. You can save the data and run the new motherboarded computer with linux and begin to reinstall XP. This is all assuming the motherboard will not accept xp. Most of the time just check if your new motherboard will support this OS. Then you should be good. 


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#3 dc3

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 05:35 PM

Obviously you are using another computer to post this.  Is the hdd on the computer you are using compatible with the hdd on the one being repaired (IDE or SATA)?

 

When you take a hdd with a Windows operating system installed from the computer it was originally installed on and install it in another computer you are asking for major problems.  This is because each chipset uses a different Plug-n-Play (PNP) ID to identify it. If you change your motherboard, your registry will have multiple PNP IDs (for the old hardware as well as the new hardware). If there are multiple entries in the registry, Windows cannot determine which hardware to initialize and therefore fails with a STOP error.  For this reason you do not want to try to boot this operating system in another computer, or in conjunction with the new motherboard.

 

If the hdd uses IDE data connectors and the computer you are using to post here with is the same you can connect the hdd to the middle connector of the IDE data cable and set the jumpers as a Slave.  Boot from the os on the computer you are now using and access the other hdd and transfer your data to a removable form of media.

 

If the hdd is a IDE type with a SATA connector on the other computer you will need a IDE to SATA adapter.

 

Do you have a valid product key for this copy of Windows 7?


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#4 BabylonHoruv

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 10:11 PM

The computer I am using now is my wife's laptop,  I have no idea what the guts of it look like and it's probably not a good idea to open it up and find out.

 

The old computer does have Linux on the drive as well as windows and I am hoping that will be able to handle the new motherboard and I can then transfer the info from the windows partitition into he linux one until I get windows 7 installed.  I do indeed have  valid product key for windows 7.  It's a SATA drive.






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