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2013 Computer Running Price Per Month!


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Maxey243

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 06:40 PM

Hello and thank you for reading this post.

 

My father is always moaning at me for being on my computer for the most of the day, he thinks I play games 24/7 when I am actually doing important college work. He always says to me "You're always on that computer, I want it to be turned off at 11:00pm. You don't pay the electric bill so I decide when it goes off!" I decided to take matters into my own hands, I'm going to pay the electric will for my room. 

 

Does anyone know (in £'s) how much it cost to run a computer and monitor in 2013 for 24 hours? I found that some people say it cost around 80p per 24 hours but, that was in 2006, I need the prices for 2013.

 

If someone could tell me an equation or something I can do to work this out then I would be very grateful!

 

Thank you!



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#2 sikntired

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:51 PM

You may find this to be of interest: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/2404

 

However, you will have to convert USD to  £'s. And may have to equate any inflation or seasonality increases. But you should be able to arrive at a fairly accurate cost as there are several criteria used.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Good Luck



#3 ddeerrff

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 09:28 PM

You may find this to be of interest: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/2404

 

However, you will have to convert USD to  £'s. And may have to equate any inflation or seasonality increases. But you should be able to arrive at a fairly accurate cost as there are several criteria used.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Good Luck

Except it's totally wrong.  Just because a power supply is rated at 300 watts does not mean it draws 300 watts.  It only means it is capable of providing that much power. 

 

The only way to really tell how much your system draws over a 24 hour period is to measure it.  Get yourself a watt-hour meter such as http://www.amazon.com/P3-International-P4400-Electricity-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU


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#4 sikntired

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:49 AM

 

You may find this to be of interest: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/2404

 

However, you will have to convert USD to  £'s. And may have to equate any inflation or seasonality increases. But you should be able to arrive at a fairly accurate cost as there are several criteria used.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Good Luck

Except it's totally wrong.  Just because a power supply is rated at 300 watts does not mean it draws 300 watts.  It only means it is capable of providing that much power. 

 

The only way to really tell how much your system draws over a 24 hour period is to measure it.  Get yourself a watt-hour meter such as http://www.amazon.com/P3-International-P4400-Electricity-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU

 

@ddeerrff

 

The OP suggested some response from members with regards to a possible equation. The link provided was to give the poster some info on some tools that perhaps may be of help. This was my intent.

 

However, I gather your intent is to criticize.



#5 ddeerrff

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:36 AM


However, I gather your intent is to criticize.

 

 

 

Sorry if you took it that way.  My intent was to provide a suggestion as to how to get a real indication of power usage.   Assuming a device will continuously draw it's maximum designed power is a good way to overestimate power usage. 


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#6 Maxey243

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 10:45 AM

Okay thank you for the links guys, I will defiantly look through them when I get home. I really do appreciate the help!



#7 Plastic Nev

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 03:26 PM

As a once qualified but now retired electrician, the best answer is to measure using a watt hour meter as suggested by ddeerrff,

However, considering day to day use will vary, with maybe some time away from the computer on some days but not others, I would suggest a measured period of at least a week rather than just a twenty four hour period. The watt hour meter will give you a reasonable average figure overall in watt hours, you just need to match that up with the local electricity suppliers charges per Killowatt hour.

After that, I hope your father is responsive to you offering to pay for the electricity used. Oh and that at some time or other you get some sleep time in too, :devil:


Why all the fuss, I already have Windows 8. Three windows at the front, and five at the back since I bought the house.
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#8 Andrew

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 03:23 PM

You can get an electrical meter (e.g. Kill-A-Watt) for your power outlet. If the power bill lists how many kilowatt hours the total bill is for you can determine your share by calculating the percent of the total bill that is for your outlet.


Edited by Andrew, 02 November 2013 - 03:25 PM.


#9 Maxey243

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 07:28 AM

Thank you for everyone helping me with this topic! 






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