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Network Configure and Cables


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#1 lakefever

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:21 PM

I'm sure this has been asked a million times but I cant find a definite answer.   Some facts: I have a wireless router with 6 ports. Each port is connected. I send one connection to another router in a separate building and one is to a repeater. The others go to desktops and printer.  Some of the cables are factory and some I have made. We have a slow connection, 1.4mb/.6mb due to remote location.  Several items are connected wirelessly to the router. Phones, laptops, satellite tv, etc. All seems to work surprisingly well considering our internet speeds. I am wanting to replace the router with one that has dual usb ports so we can connect a cloud drive and a printer for wireless printing from tablets and phones. I will relocate the router from its existing location and need to reconfigure some of the cable routing. I will need to re-cable in a couple of walls so I will need to reconnect some connectors and sockets. I have checked and searched about pin outs for the rj45 and sockets. It seems that the 3 types of connections are the A & B and crossover pin outs. I have made several cables using a non conforming color code sequence. I have just followed the same color code for each end. I have not had any problems that I know of and don't seem to be losing speed or have connection problems. Now the question. Am I actually losing anything by not following the standard pin out? If I change the existing connectors to follow the standard will I gain anything?.      



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#2 Animal

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:27 PM

Depending on the length of the run on Ethernet cable you could be inducing noise/signal degradation by not using standard pinout. This is due to the twist ratio for each pair within the cable. Each twisted pair pair has a specific number of twists per foot to minimize signal noise and interference. If you choose to make up your own color code you could potentially be causing more signal noise and interference than your network can mitigate.

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#3 lakefever

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:34 PM

So investing in a tester and "fixing" any non conforming cables would be beneficial?



#4 Animal

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:40 PM

If the runs are over 50 feet, I would say yes the potential for improved signal transfer is there. Less than 50 feet and it will be minimal improvement. Is your cabling ANSI/TIA/EIA compliant?

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#5 lakefever

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 03:01 PM

2 runs are about 50 feet and one is about a 100. I know some of the cable is compliant, and 'm sure the other is, but I will have to check to be 100% sure.



#6 Animal

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:27 PM

Are they cable continuous runs? Or are there patch panels within the runs?

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#7 lakefever

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 07:58 AM

They are continuous, no patch panels



#8 Animal

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:59 AM

I would go ahead and fix the pin outs and test the cables, you might not gain anything except meet TIA EIA compliance. As well as eliminate one of the suspects for troubleshooting. If you don't have a handy reference here is the proper pin out.

ethernetrj45a1.gif

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
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A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


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#9 lakefever

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:33 AM

Its a little puzzling to me. Our service is a 1 mb/.4mb. Speed test show 1.3 to 1.4/.6. No problems with connection or dropped signals. Seems to be stable and reliable. But with the help you have given I think testing and correcting to eliminate any question as to any loss/interference/crossover would be beneficial.  At this speed the system needs all the help it can get.  I also just found a new company that is now providing service in our area with 12/1 speeds. So this might be an option but I do want my system at peak performance. I don't want a 12/1 speed with equipment choking the system to 3/.4.  Our isp service is difficult due to living in the country. We have dial-up, satellite, or wireless service available.  Satellite and cell providers speeds are good, but these companies throttle your service. Who needs that? we have had a wireless provider for 15 years, but they only provide 1mb down/ .4 up. So this is why the question of cabling since I believe everything else is doing all it can.           



#10 lakefever

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 06:49 PM

ok. Got things going so now on to another project. I have a router with 8 ports and all ports are full and used. I want to get a router with 2 usb ports for a cloud drive and a printer. The problem is teh new router has 4 lan ports. If I use a switch or hub and connect 4 devices to it, will I lose speed to these 4 devices? Connecting them wirelessly is not an option.  Do I have other choices?



#11 CaveDweller2

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 01:29 PM

You have 8 port router/switch that is full and you have need to connect some network storage and a printer. You don't want to do it wireless, so you are looking for better options? Is that about right?

 

If so, your idea of getting another switch, not a hub, is the best. I dunno if you'd notice a slow down unless you are transferring large files to the cloud.

 

Oh your first post, I agree with Animal in that cables are designed to be put together a certain way and its not worth the few seconds it costs to get the cables in the connectors correctly over what might happen if done willy-nilly =)


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College





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