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Installing a windows 7 oem


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#1 Tragedy1191

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:30 PM

Is installing an oem time consuming, difficult, and risky(Meaning is it more likely to be faulty? newegg does not allow refunds on oem's) ? Like anybody else, I seriously hate window's 8, I just want a basic and good OS. A retail box for win 7 is about 260!!!


Edited by Tragedy1191, 21 October 2013 - 09:30 PM.


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#2 Platypus

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:46 PM

Are you asking if an OEM installation is more difficult or risky than a retail version? If so, in practice no, there's no difference between the two in terms of Windows itself. The only difference is in the license (OEM can't be transferred to another computer, retail can for example), and support (e.g. retail Windows has phone support from Microsoft for installation troubles, OEM doesn't). Again, in practice, there's seldom much problem with the basic install, and support from tech help sites like BC can assist if there is.

 

Precautions will be the same for both OEM and Retail, such as confirming Windows 7 drivers are available for the system it is to be used on.


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#3 Tragedy1191

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:05 PM

Yeah comparing to a retail version. For OEM I'm always hearing about the OPK (I think that's what it's called) and how it needs to be installed first. I went on to check it out on the website (Microsoft) and it looks like a long process. Registering, downloading to a disk, installing and all these other steps, it just sounds bleh! Not only that I always here reviews that OEM's can be faulty or the product key doesn't work. It sounds like I'll be consuming a lot of my time troubleshooting and wasting money that can't be returned you know? And I'm building a PC from scratch and first time attempting an OEM installation.



#4 TsVk!

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:47 AM

As a Win 8 license holder you can downgrade to 7 legally. Here's a MS FAQ/thing about it...

 

http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/what_to_do_downgrade_rights.aspx

 

edit: and no, it's not just OEM who can downgrade.

edit edit: reinstalling an OS is a pile of steps, no matter how you do it.

edit edit edit: Platypus hit a very important point though, whether or not your system is capable of Win 7 (driver availability etc.). I found that just installing a Win 7 start button&menu on Win 8 fixed all the pain and avoided the nasty reformat OS pain in the donkey. Here's a useful list of start button programs. I use "Classic Shell" on clients computers who feel like you, and they come away happy generally.


Edited by TsVk!, 22 October 2013 - 12:58 AM.


#5 Platypus

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:01 AM

The OPK is only necessary to enable a system builder to automate multiple installations - for a single computer installation you can simply boot from the DVD and proceed with the installation whether the source media is OEM or Retail.

 

If there is any issue whether the system mainboard utilizes a BIOS or is UEFI, this will be a decision in its own right, and affects Retail and OEM installations identically:

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh290675%28v=ws.10%29.aspx


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