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New Build: Too many intake fans?


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#1 Peco

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 04:49 PM

Hi, I've chosen to go with a BitFenix Shadow case, which has 2 spots up front for 120mm fans, 1 exhaust fan in the back (up top), and another spot for a 120mm intake fan underneath. The PSU is bottom mounted and will inhale from the bottom and out the back directly.

 

I would like to fill all four fan spots if possible (because I'm compulsive that way), however I'm concerned about there being too much pressure with 3 total 120mm intakes and only one 120mm exhaust.  If this is a bad idea, I'm still hellbent on putting both 120mm fans upfront, but could probably excuse the bottom fan.

 

I don't intend on even getting a graphics card with this build because I'm not a gamer.  Just a good Motherboard with a fast CPU, and maybe 8 or 16 GB of RAM.

 

Too much positive pressure and turbulance is what I'm concerned about. What say you?

 

http://www.bitfenix.com/global/en/products/chassis/shadow#specs

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811345032

 

Also, I have little knowledge about cooling the CPU.  Should I go with something aftermarket?  From what I understand the OEM heatsink/fan assemblies blow air into the heatsink?  Help please and thank you.


Edited by Peco, 20 October 2013 - 04:50 PM.


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#2 wolfeking

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 05:56 PM

Having more intake than exhaust will not create too much pressure. What it does is create a positive pressure system inside the case, which reduce dust buildup. To be honest, you can ever create a damaging amount of pressure inside a computer case, as none of them are airtight. 

 

What to do for CPU cooling is going to depend a bit on which CPU. If you go for something low end like a Pentium or Celeron (and corresponding AMD models), then you would just be wasting your money with aftermarket cooling. If you are running a quad core, or overclocking, then you would be better off with a half decent cooler, something along the lines of a hyper 212 or any of its competitors (if you get a 212, replace the fans with Noctua, Corsair, or another high SP fan, it really makes a difference). 


If you're in a war, instead of throwing a hand grenade at the enemy, throw one of those small pumpkins. Maybe it'll make everyone think how stupid war is, and while they are thinking, you can throw a real grenade at them.

 

I personally do not trust new products or webcams. This is why my desktop is 3 years old, and my laptops older than that. 


#3 Peco

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 06:17 PM

Thanks for the reply.  Yeah, I'm not going to be cutting corners with the motherboard or CPU.  I'm looking to go middle-high end with the CPU but not top shelf.  This is going to be my baby after all.  No overclocking intentions either. Overclocking is very interesting to me, just unnecessary for what I want this thing to do.  I probably could get away with a Celeron or Pentium CPU for what I'm trying to use it for, which is basically a workstation.  At the same time I don't want to limit myself either.  I game, I just haven't in years due to other obligations.  Who knows, I might through a GPU in it someday.

 

As far as turbulance goes...  all modern BIOS can adjust the speed of the fans individually, right?  I just want to make sure I'm not blowing air all around inside the case, instead of it being a a fairly nice stream. I appreciate the suggestion on the hyper 212, and fan replacement.  I'm looking into that for sure.


Edited by Peco, 20 October 2013 - 06:22 PM.


#4 dpunisher

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 06:18 PM

Yup, always preferable to overpressure a case.  Run filters on your intakes, clean them once in awhile, and that pretty much solves any potential dust problems.  You don't even need exhaust fans in a lot of cases.


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

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#5 rotor123

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:00 AM

Personal opinion. Have You ever noticed brand name computers and how they are set up with fans? Mostly one in the power supply, one on the CPU Cooler, and maybe one exhausting out the back. They run Quiet and cool.

 

You could get by with one intake fan and one exhaust fan if You feel a need.

The 120mm fans should run at a low RPM and be quiet. They can run slower and quieter and still move the same amount of air as smaller fans do. Look for a power supply noise rating, same with the CPU cooling fan and the 120mm fans.

 

Quiet is good since My desktop site next to the HDTV which is its display. I also disconnected all the lights on it except for the drive activity light so they were not a distraction.

 

For the usage you describe You do not needs huge amounts of airflow.

 

Good Luck

Roger


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#6 Peco

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:49 PM

Sound advice Roger.  You know, I've been told I worry too much.  The case comes with two 120mm fans pre-mounted.  One in the front near the bottom (there is another place for a fan below that.)  And one in the rear near the top.  This does make sense.

 

I hate to extend the thread and get off topic here but really, you're right.  The CPU I chose is a Haswell Core i3 with integrated graphics.  I'll be using only a 256GB SSD as my sole storage device (for now).  A couple sticks of 4 GB DDR3 1600 (again no overclocking intentions.)  And probably a fairly low wattage PSU.  I would say the CPU is going to generate the most heat, and maybe an aftermarket CPU cooler is probably doing too much.

 

I went with the LGA 1150 socket for possible future upgrades, even though I didn't get a motherboard with a Z87 chipset.  They are so expensive and unnecessary if I'm not trying to overclock everything.

 

Lastly, what defines quiet for a fan?  A guy at work told me that <35 dB is pretty quiet, yet the two stock fans that come with my case claim they are <20 dB.  I'm applying this to my PSU choice too.  Input is appreciated as always.


Edited by Peco, 21 October 2013 - 11:15 PM.


#7 Peco

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:07 PM

Also, even though I went to college for computer networking, I have very limited knowledge of the hardware side of things.  If i type anything completely stupid, please let me know.  I have my A+, but at the time, that was just crap I had to do, to get to the fun stuff.  (Routing and switching... and being a control-freak).  I'm currently employed as a service tech now however and I'm getting turned on to the hardware stuff and want to make my own baby.  This thing should have no bottlenecks aside from gaming, that is my goal.  I have the fastest Internet package in my city, I want to make a speed demon, that I can do stuff with... well... you know what I mean.  This is my hobby now.



#8 rotor123

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:02 AM

Sound advice Roger.  You know, I've been told I worry too much.  The case comes with two 120mm fans pre-mounted.  One in the front near the bottom (there is another place for a fan below that.)  And one in the rear near the top.  This does make sense.

 

I hate to extend the thread and get off topic here but really, you're right.  The CPU I chose is a Haswell Core i3 with integrated graphics.  I'll be using only a 256GB SSD as my sole storage device (for now).  A couple sticks of 4 GB DDR3 1600 (again no overclocking intentions.)  And probably a fairly low wattage PSU.  I would say the CPU is going to generate the most heat, and maybe an aftermarket CPU cooler is probably doing too much.

 

I went with the LGA 1150 socket for possible future upgrades, even though I didn't get a motherboard with a Z87 chipset.  They are so expensive and unnecessary if I'm not trying to overclock everything.

 

Lastly, what defines quiet for a fan?  A guy at work told me that <35 dB is pretty quiet, yet the two stock fans that come with my case claim they are <20 dB.  I'm applying this to my PSU choice too.  Input is appreciated as always.

With the hardware You describe,

an I3, a SSD both run pretty cool. a Box Intel i3 with the Intel heatsink and fan should be more that adequate as well as quiet.

I have a older, now, i7 where I used the retail Intel CPU and the Intel Heat Sink and fan, AKA HSF, is quiet, and runs cool enough even under full load such as encoding Video. I used the same strategy when I built my brothers computer. SSD, i7, 1Tb Data drive. His has one fan in the back under the power supply. His run cool too.

I have always over the years since socket 370 days found that the Intel HSF to be quiet, reliable, and durable. When You buy a Intel Box CPU the HSF assembly comes with a thermal compound already applied. I have found that to be decent.

 

Next as far as a SSD, some tips.

Read User Reviews

Good Brands are Intel and Samsung

Samsung 840Pro and not the 840EVO, personal opinion.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7173/samsung-ssd-840-evo-review-120gb-250gb-500gb-750gb-1tb-models-tested

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6328/samsung-ssd-840-pro-256gb-review

I mainly use Intel SSDs for my computers, Currently 4 in use in the house. At the time I bought the Intel 320 series was expected to be among the more reliable. A certain brand I looked at had terrible reviews so I went with the more expensive Intel, Not the fastest but then In my opinion reliable trumps raw speed. Plus a 5 year warranty. I have a couple of Samsung SSDs too.

 

Quiet is somewhat subjective. The lower the db rating the quieter. I'm on a simple All-In-One, AKA AIO,  desktop that I can not hear running over the outside noises. Brand Name computers are usually silent.

The Small footprint of this AIO that being the Computer is in the screen outweighed the disadvantages of a AIO, Those being, No upgrades, 8x DVD laptop burner, Any part has a problem it is all bad.

 

Air flow should be in at the bottom and exhaust at the top since hot air rises.

 

Two things to look at with a power supply, Brand!, Efficiency, higher efficiency should reduce waste heat and the electric bill. If you plan to do upgrades in the future will the power supply be big enough?

 

Also Make sure You have USB3 ports as used with USB3 storage they are much faster.

 

Also, even though I went to college for computer networking, I have very limited knowledge of the hardware side of things.  If i type anything completely stupid, please let me know.  I have my A+, but at the time, that was just crap I had to do, to get to the fun stuff.  (Routing and switching... and being a control-freak).  I'm currently employed as a service tech now however and I'm getting turned on to the hardware stuff and want to make my own baby.  This thing should have no bottlenecks aside from gaming, that is my goal.  I have the fastest Internet package in my city, I want to make a speed demon, that I can do stuff with... well... you know what I mean.  This is my hobby now.

 

Just curious what speedtest.net shows for your internet. I get 117.12 Mb/s down and 37.10Mb/s up for comparison. And that is over wireless. Wired is some what faster FWIW.

Here is a tip for wireless, If You decide to go Wireless, Get Dual Band, I get 3 times faster speeds on the 5Ghz band, possibly due to the 2.4Ghz band being congested. I also went 802.11ac.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac

 

IEEE 802.11ac is a wireless computer networking standard in the 802.11 family (which is marketed under the brand name Wi-Fi), developed in the IEEE Standards Association process,[1] providing high-throughput wireless local area networks (WLANs) on the 5 GHz band

......................

This specification has expected multi-station WLAN throughput of at least 1 gigabit per second and a single link throughput of at least 500 megabits per second (500 Mbit/s).

 

Good Luck

Roger


Edited by rotor123, 22 October 2013 - 09:02 AM.

Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
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167 @ June 2015


#9 Peco

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 07:53 PM

speedtest.net is showing me 33.71 Mbps / 3.82 Mbps.  Which I can live with because I'm paying for 30 / 5.  Jesus man, 117 DL?  Can you even tell the difference when you upgraded?  I'm just curious.  The apartment buiding I live in, this is the fastest package I can get.  (Or maybe its because I'm in nowhereland.)  I always prefer Ethernet over Wifi if its convenient enough.  I like the info on the 802.11ac, by the way.  Good stuff to know.

 

I was actually intending on getting a 256GB 840 Pro, but now you got me shopping Intel too.. comparing prices and speeds.

 

USB 3.0 is dope, must agree.  The MSI motherboard I'm ordering has 2 in the back, and headers for the two USB 3 ports in the front of my case.  When you were talking about power supplies, what brands do you suggest?  We sell alot of Thermaltakes at work for gaming rigs.  Otherwise, Antec 380W or 500W.  And I'm pretty sure I want a modular PSU, but are there any benefits going non-modular?  Besides price?  The case I have doesn't have a side window (never been a fan of those), yet still I'm leaning towards modular.


Edited by Peco, 22 October 2013 - 08:04 PM.


#10 rotor123

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 09:55 AM

Going to Your power supply question things to look for

What type of Connectors, How many connectors

Types would be 4 Pin and or 8 pin to the motherboard for CPU power, Depends on the Motherboardl

20/24 pin ATX should be standard on all these days.

4 Pin Molex for older drives

SATA power for modern drives

PCIexpress 6 pin power for video cards

Efficiency of the power supply.

 

That is one reason right now for most of my Internet forums and emails usage, 95% Plus anyway.

I am using this All-In-One desktop with its 120Watt power supply or a laptop that uses even less power.

Less than 120 watt power usage including the built-in screen, I say less as there has to be a reserve  factor. Both save space too.

I also have a i7 Desktop that I use for Video work.

 

 

Well, from here in this message:

 

The Seasonic X650 is a well built 650W power supply which has a Gold efficency and is fully modular, meaning you will only use the cables that are required and keeps its less clustered.

And from here in this message:

 

PSU: CORSAIR Builder Series CX600 600W - This can run all but the highest end graphics cards

As with any computer parts read the user reviews..........

Example would be to read the reviews from Here or for this model here

And this different brand from here or from here

Or from a different seller

I'm not suggesting any of these as I am linking them as examples only so You can see what the differences are in user reviews.

Not to mention within the models a manufacturer sells how some are better than others.

 

I like modular as there are less wires since only what is needed are in the case which makes it easier to keep them neat. Only You can decide if that matters enough to spend the extra money.

 

The Internet Speed is because My brother wanted it and is willing to pay 1/2 of it. To answer Your question I could tell the difference when I download ISO files that have as an example different Linux distributions in them to burn to a CD or DVD. Some of the Software I have Bought online is fairly large. I send large emails with scanned photos to family and the upload speed helps there.

 

I have noticed that most of the larger cable companies are delivering higher than advertised speeds. I'm paying for 101Mb/s speed. I think that is a decent speed for using a wireless connection.

 

Good Luck with Your decision

Roger


Edited by rotor123, 23 October 2013 - 09:55 AM.

Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

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How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
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167 @ June 2015





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