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Upgrade sequence for mobo/cpu and Win 7?


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#1 okiewild

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 05:49 PM

I found many tutorials about upgrading, but nothing so far about the sequence when doing hardware and OS at the same time.

 

I have an old XP (in Antec Sonata tower) with 4GB max RAM etc. I've purchased Win 7 64-bit, ASUS Z87-A LGA 1150 Intel mobo, i5-4670K Haswell LGA quad-core cpu, and Gskill Ripjaw 8GB RAM.

 

I know Win 7 64-bit needs the new playmates to function. What I'd like to know is, can I do all the hardware as phase one, then take a break and come back later to install Win 7? Or does it really matter?



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#2 wolfeking

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 05:27 AM

You could do that, depending on how exactly you are meaning. Legally speaking, you could not run the XP (assuming you did not mean Athlon XP, in case that is a different story) install on the new motherboard without reactivating. This does not mean that you can not do what you asked. Installing the new motherboard and CPU will do nothing without software (Linux, BSD, Windows, OSx, etc.), so you will just be limited until you install. 

 

In case that is confusing, here it is simplified. 

 

-Your old install may or may not boot. Serial key is invalid on the new equipment if your windows is OEM. 

-Installing the hardware does not require the software at the same time. 

-You will need a new copy of windows, which you have. 

-Taking a break between the hardware and software installs will not make a difference. 

 

Have fun with your new computer. 


If you're in a war, instead of throwing a hand grenade at the enemy, throw one of those small pumpkins. Maybe it'll make everyone think how stupid war is, and while they are thinking, you can throw a real grenade at them.

 

I personally do not trust new products or webcams. This is why my desktop is 3 years old, and my laptops older than that. 


#3 okiewild

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:18 PM

Wolfeking,

The concern lurking behind my question was the possibility of a land mine hiding in the procedure. Especially considering all the cash I spent.

 

Although you answered the last of my questions, I got a land mine in the form of a delay. When I opened the package for the motherboard, the plastic cap covering the cpu socket was dislodged and floating around in the anti-static bag. Not 15 minutes before that, I'd read an Intel owners manual saying that if anything at all looks wrong with the protective cap or the socket itself when you open the package, immediately send it back to the vendor. I discovered that Newegg has an efficient online RMA process.

 

Once I get the replacement mobo, I'm sure I'll have fun with the improvements.



#4 wolfeking

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:52 PM

There is no land mine in the procedure generally (speaking of the windows issues, not of hardware).  If you were to want to try to boot the old install with the new equipment, you will have to set the UEFI to IDE/Compatibility mode, and likely have to use safemode to boot up (uninstall all the old drivers). It will likely throw a fit about activation, but should give you 30 days to activate. 

 

Or if you are mainly looking to check functionality, then you could create a live boot disk/flashkey for a Linux distro and use that to test the components for functionality. Takes a very short time to do, and does not require an install, unlike windows. 

 

*sorry if this has absolutely nothing to do with any issue you have* 


If you're in a war, instead of throwing a hand grenade at the enemy, throw one of those small pumpkins. Maybe it'll make everyone think how stupid war is, and while they are thinking, you can throw a real grenade at them.

 

I personally do not trust new products or webcams. This is why my desktop is 3 years old, and my laptops older than that. 





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