Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

'Root kits' - question about how they work..


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 nexus666

nexus666

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:00 AM

Posted 08 October 2013 - 04:14 AM

so i have been infected with root kits before on various comps and have become a bit paranoid about typing anything in nowdays.  anyways, i realized that i really have no comprehension of how they really even function and was curious.  

 

mainly, i'm trying to wrap my brain around how it works.  so is it like, when a rootkit infected computer boots up... does a remote hacker have their own entire desktop alternate loaded operating system that comes up?   or is it invisible cmd type lines they can input ?  i'm just trying to grasp how it all really works.  when a comp gets 'rooted' does that mean theres an entire different desktop running or is it much more simple than that?    just tying to understand how all this works... i know they are typically used to install keyloggers and the like, but i can't really visually grasp what it looks like on the remote hackers side and was wondering.  



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 noknojon

noknojon

  • Banned
  • 10,871 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 08 October 2013 - 05:32 AM

A basic guide to a Rootkit -From Wikipedia
General guide ZeroAccess RootKit Activity from Symantec (Norton)
TDSSKiller Download - Bleeping Computer
These types of programs are typically harder to remove than generic malware, which is the reason that stand-alone utilities such as TDSSKiller have been developed.
 

You might post the same question, or look for answers in the Antivirus / Antimalware Forum area.

 

Thank You -






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users