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Can a "Standard Account" in W8 block viruses?


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#1 ComputerNeophyte

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 09:52 PM

I was told that that an advantage of running  a standard account in lieu of an administrator account is that it should block some viruses, malware, etc, from running, because any new program--including viruses--would require an administrator's code.

 

Is that true?  I'm confused as to how that would play out. 

 

Neophyte.



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#2 gaby13

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 07:54 AM

Administrator accounts provide the most control over a PC, and should be used sparingly. You probably created this type of account when you first started using your PC.
 
Standard accounts are for everyday use. If you're setting up accounts for other people on your PC, it's a good idea to give them standard accounts.
 
The standard account is an unelevated restricted users account. It can help protect your computer by preventing users from making changes that affect everyone who uses the computer, such as deleting files that are required for the computer to work. It is recommend to create a standard account for each user instead of an administrator account for the user. When you are logged on to Windows with a standard account, you can do almost anything that you can do with an administrator account, but if a standard user wanted to do something that requires elevated rights that affects other users of the computer, such as installing software or changing security settings, Windows will give the standard user a UAC prompt to enter the password of an administrator account for approval and confirmation before allowing the action.
 
The first time you set up Windows, you created a user account. This account is automatically an administrator account, so that you can finish setting up your PC and install any programs that you would like to use. When you add other accounts to your PC, however, they'll usually be standard accounts. Standard accounts are best for everyday use.


#3 ComputerNeophyte

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 08:30 AM

 

Administrator accounts provide the most control over a PC, and should be used sparingly. You probably created this type of account when you first started using your PC.
 
Standard accounts are for everyday use. If you're setting up accounts for other people on your PC, it's a good idea to give them standard accounts.
 
The standard account is an unelevated restricted users account. It can help protect your computer by preventing users from making changes that affect everyone who uses the computer, such as deleting files that are required for the computer to work. It is recommend to create a standard account for each user instead of an administrator account for the user. When you are logged on to Windows with a standard account, you can do almost anything that you can do with an administrator account, but if a standard user wanted to do something that requires elevated rights that affects other users of the computer, such as installing software or changing security settings, Windows will give the standard user a UAC prompt to enter the password of an administrator account for approval and confirmation before allowing the action.
 
The first time you set up Windows, you created a user account. This account is automatically an administrator account, so that you can finish setting up your PC and install any programs that you would like to use. When you add other accounts to your PC, however, they'll usually be standard accounts. Standard accounts are best for everyday use.

 

 

 

Okay, thanks.  I gotta get a W8 book or something.  I hate guessing my way through this stuff. I was just wondering if a user account could provide any preventive protection other than requiring administrator's approval to download programs.  I mean, you wouldn't know if any given program was infected with a virus until you tried to download it anyway; and then we would hope and expect our anti-virus would catch it. In other words, the primary benefit--apparently--in preventing internet viruses would be in that a standard account would call for an adminstrator's code,  entered by the person who--presumably--is in the position to make the final determination as to whether or not it was safe to download; but once that program is downloaded there's no longer any added protection against any attached malware.    Other than that exclusive example, I can't think of any way a standard account could provide any additional protection.  If it were that simple, we'd all just have a standard account and throw out our Malwarebytes.

 

 

If I'm not thinking right feel free to beat me;)

 

Neophyte


Edited by ComputerNeophyte, 07 October 2013 - 09:00 AM.


#4 ComputerNeophyte

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 08:41 AM

...But there is one scenario where I was thinking a standard account might provide some additional protection. What if a I were to click a fake pop up infected with malware attached?  Might I not get the message telling me I need administrator approval?  I guess that was the one area I was confused about.

 

Neophyte.



#5 ComputerNeophyte

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:15 AM

Ya know, this is stupid of me, asking these dumb questions.  I suppose if I want to answer these types of questions I'll have to take the time to learn a language like C or VB, and more about operating systems.  No reason to blast this busy forum with superfluous questions.  Chances are, I wouldn't understand the answer anyway with my present knowledge. You have to forgive me, I'm new at this.  My only exposure to computing until recently has been the public library for email and pics.

 

I won't erase this thread because someone was kind enough to post in it.  But I wish I hadn't started it. It makes me look more stupid than I really am.

 

Neophyte.


Edited by ComputerNeophyte, 07 October 2013 - 10:24 AM.


#6 Grinler

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 12:51 PM

No, this is not a dumb question by any means.

To answer your original question, no a standard account wont protect you from infections. Infections can still be installed into the user's profile and launched under HKCU registry keys/User's Start Menu. On the other hand, these types of infections are typically easier to remove and only affect the user that is infected.

Other users on the machine will not be infected when they log in.

#7 ComputerNeophyte

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:42 PM

No, this is not a dumb question by any means.

To answer your original question, no a standard account wont protect you from infections. Infections can still be installed into the user's profile and launched under HKCU registry keys/User's Start Menu. On the other hand, these types of infections are typically easier to remove and only affect the user that is infected.

Other users on the machine will not be infected when they log in.

 

 

Okay, thanks. I think you understood my question better than I understood it myself.  Then my understanding was correct; a standard account does not really provide any added protection beyond what may come with requiring an administrator's code first.  After that point, nothing is off limits, including the belly of the beast, a.k.a. the registry.  But as you say, those "types of infections are typically easier to remove..." and that's worth knowing.

 

Neophyte



#8 Grinler

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:06 PM

Correct. Standard user mode definitely provides better protection against infections that install to folders that standard user's do not have permission to, installation of drivers, patching of files, etc. So there is definitely an advantage. What I am saying, though, is that you can still get infected.




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