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How to clean this fan (image included)


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Shinobi_32

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 03:07 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I'm attempting to clean the fan on my Advent Centurion CBE1401, but not sure how,

 

As you can see from the image below it's water cooled so i'm worried if i try to remove the fan that I'll release the liquid in the pipes somehow.

 

My only aim is to clean the internal fans as the computer keeps switching off due to over-heating because the fans are to blocked especially the fan in the image. The image below is not taken of my PC (just the same PC model), as in my fan the grill you can see is completely blocked.

 

So I'm desperately looking for help on how to go about cleaning it.

 

12909-img4222s.jpg

 

 

Thanks

Lee :)

 

 



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#2 GB2064

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 04:44 PM

Shinobi_32

Here are a couple of links that give plenty of good cleaning advice.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/cleaning-the-inside-of-your-pc/

 

http://www.computerhope.com/cleaning.htm



#3 Shinobi_32

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 04:57 PM

Hi GB6024,

 

Those links are good and I've bookmarked them , but i just need to know how to clean this specific fan.

 

I don't know whether i should be removing it or not...



#4 GB2064

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 10:42 AM

I, myself, being unfamiliar with water cooling, would not remove it.

I would simply try to use canned compressed air to blow the dust out in the opposite direction of the normal air flow.

A couple of precautions though, as stated in those links, I would wear an anti static wrist band, and also, restrain the fan blades when blowing the compressed air to keep them from spinning.

 

Also, in my search for those links, I came across some links that stated your water level should be checked periodically, as I said, I am not really familiar with water cooling, but your water level might be part of your over heating problem also.

So if you clean out the dust, and the problem continues, that may be something else to check.



#5 rotor123

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:09 PM

Hi,

The Fan should be blowing the hot air out of the computer case. So take the compressed air can and blow through the fan into the case. I would have someone hold a vacuum hose near but not touching to catch the dust. That is not the fan, the fan is between that radiator and the back of the case,  what You are calling the fan is the water cooling radiator. It works just like the radiator on a car. The heated water circulates through the flattened tubes that run up and down, The Fins between the tubes give a larger surface for the cooling air to blow through and carry away the heat..

 

In All probability if the radiator is clogged with dust so are the cooling fins on the Video Card. If You have the same video card the fan is on the bottom of the card and the cooling fins are the Aluminium part between the card and the plastic fan shroud.

 

Also Your Power supply may also be dusty as it has 1 or more fans pulling cooling air through it too.

 

Be very careful not to bump and interior parts when sucking out the dust.

 

Good Luck

Roger


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#6 slgrieb

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 03:48 PM

Generally, if you need to clean an air filter or radiator, you should remove it from the system and use compressed air or canned air to blow out the grit. When I say removing the hardware from the system, I'm  saying you should try to get it outside of the case so you aren't just blowing dirt back into the computer and giving yourself some more cleanup work. It isn't always practical to completely remove some components such as radiators for water coolers. If you have a fan with a lot of build up on the blades, disconnect it, dismount it, and wipe it down.

 

In spite of rotor123's suggestion, the absolute worst mistake you can make when cleaning a fan is to use air pressure to blow back against the fan's normal airflow. If you look at any fan, they always have a closed end that contains the motor and the bearings for the fan, and the other end that is open around the edges to accommodate the shaft for the blades. All fans move air from the closed end toward the open end of the fan to reduce blowing contaminants into the bearings. So, you never want to clean a dirty fan by blowing air into it against the normal direction of airflow.


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#7 Shinobi_32

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 04:29 PM

Thanks for taking the time to give such detailed reply's, guys.

I cleaned the whole computer out with the compressed air, and unscrewed the radiator so i could give it a more thorough clean, but unfortunately this didn't work, the computer still goes dead for seemingly no reason. So i guess I'm back to square one.

 

 EDIT: Yes i thought the radiator was some kind of fan lol shows what a noob i am when it comes to hardware.

 

Lee :)


Edited by Shinobi_32, 06 October 2013 - 04:31 PM.


#8 rotor123

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:12 PM

Did You check the Video Card and power supply. When the computer shuts off does the video card feel hot or does the power supply feel hot? Look at the CPU and make sure the cooling block is attached solidly. It is the part on the motherboard with the radiator hoses going to it in the image you posted.

 

Roger


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#9 GB2064

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:12 AM

I am just curious now.

How do these systems circulate the water?

Do they have a pump that could go bad, or do they just rely on convection for circulation?

Also, could the problem be a low coolant level?



#10 rotor123

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 08:50 AM

Hello GB2064

 

I am just curious now.

How do these systems circulate the water?

Do they have a pump that could go bad, or do they just rely on convection for circulation?

Also, could the problem be a low coolant level?

Yes they have a Pump as far as I know, They have to if You think about it. Convection could not be guaranteed to work with all the cases mounting points. Also convection depends on the difference in temperature. Warm Water as well as Air rises and colder water will sink.

For example in the old days of coal fired furnaces that used water vs steam they dud use convection. However all the modern heated water furnaces use a pump. That means the heat will arrive quicker. Convection has a higher latency before delivering heat.

So Yes the Pump could go bad or there could be a low water level.

 

Easy enough to test. put a finger on the Cooling block at the CPU. Is It hot? Does the radiator feel hot too? Are the hoses getting hot?

Is there air coming out of the back of the computer from the radiator fan and if so does it feel warm?

I'm guessing that the OPs fan is/was working or the radiator would not have become clogged with dust.

 

Yes the pump could go bad, Anything with moving parts has a finite lifetime. How long will depend on the quality of the part.

 

Cheers

Roger


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#11 rotor123

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:01 AM

In spite of rotor123's suggestion, the absolute worst mistake you can make when cleaning a fan is to use air pressure to blow back against the fan's normal airflow. If you look at any fan, they always have a closed end that contains the motor and the bearings for the fan, and the other end that is open around the edges to accommodate the shaft for the blades. All fans move air from the closed end toward the open end of the fan to reduce blowing contaminants into the bearings. So, you never want to clean a dirty fan by blowing air into it against the normal direction of airflow.

 

I'll have to disagree on that based on personal experience blowing out many, many fans as well as replacing failed fans, You are more likely to have the fan seize due to cheap or dried out bearings. Another source of potential problem with blowing out a fan is using a high air pressure and overspeeding the fan bearings.

 

I do not clean the fan itself with air if possible. I prefer to use a small brush and brush the blades and the rest of the fan. You do need to be careful not to break a blade of course.

 

If You look at this page from HP

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01657439&tmp_track_link=ot_recdoc/c00292159/en_us/c01657439/loc:1&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us

They demonstrate cleaning laptop cooling fins by blowing air in from outside, IE reversing the air flow.

 

I consider this type of topic to be a 50/50 topic. Just like the "leave the computer running 24 hours a day" vs the "Shut it down when not planning to use it for a while". Both side say that their method reduces wear and tear and prolongs the computers life.

 

Best Regards

Roger


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